AUTHOR OF THIS BLOG

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO, WORLDDRUGTRACKER
Aug 222016
 

 

Training Course – IN SILICO DRUG DISCOVERY & DESIGNING: INSIGHTS OF PROTEIN-LIGAND INTERACTIONS. Oct 01, 2016  at Le Méridien Bangalore Hotel in Bengaluru, India.

https://selectbiosciences.com/trainingCoursesID.aspx?tc=DDD16&pid=4820&conf=DDI16&se=india

http://selectbiosciences.com/conferences/index.aspx?conf=DDI16&se=india

http://selectbiosciences.com/conferences/venue.aspx?pid=4817&conf=DDI16&se=india

Dear Colleague,

SELECTBIO would like to remind you about its Training Course – IN SILICO DRUG DISCOVERY & DESIGNING: INSIGHTS OF PROTEIN-LIGAND INTERACTIONS. This is scheduled to be held on October 01, 2016 from 9:00am to 5:00pm at Le Méridien Bangalore Hotel in Bengaluru, India. This course will be held in conjunction with our 4th International Conference “Drug Discovery India 2016“. Attend the Training Course and the Conference andSave 10% against the regular registration charges.

PROFILE OF ATTENDEES
With basic knowledge in Life Science and Drug Design that would like to receive a comprehensive overview or refresher on the Drug Discovery Technology the target audience comprises:
• Student & Faculty: Bachelor, Masters, PhD, students as well as Faculty and Professors from Microbiology, Biochemistry, Biotechnology, Immunology, Pharmacy, Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Biomedical Technology, Genetics, Bioinformatics, Plant Science and Life Sciences.
• Professionals: Biotechnology, Bioinformatics and Pharmaceutical scientists from industry, academia and regulatory agencies.
Hands-on exercises will be performed individually using Software tools (no prior experience required).

COURSE CONTENTS

• Introduction of Drug Designing
• Science involved in Disease Target Identification
• Virtual Screening
Practical application will be done on 5 molecules and the software on which DEMONSTRATION & TRAINING will be given
• In-Silico Generation of Ligands by ChemSketch
• Conversion of mol files to pdf files by Open Babel
• Protein Optimization & Energy Minimization by SPDBV
• Molecular Docking by MGL Tools | Creation of Grid Parameter & Dock Parameter Files by AutoDock Software
• Running the Algorithm by Cygwin
• Selection of Potent Inhibitors on the basis of Binding Energies and Lipinski’s Rule of 5
• Structure Analysis – Protein & Ligand complex H-bond interaction by UCSF Chimera
• Prediction of Molecular Properties- Molinspiration
• Prediction of Bioactivity- Molinspiration & ACD iLabs
• Drug Likeness – Mol Soft
• Bioavailability & ADME- ACD iLabs
• Toxicity- OSIRIS Property Explorer & ACD iLabs

For more information, or to discuss registration options, please contact me on the details given below.

Thanks and Best Regards

Sakshi Modgil
Customer Services Manager
SELECTBIO INDIA
O: +91 172 5025050
M: +91 7696125050
s.modgil@selectbio.com

Copyright © 2016 SELECTBIO, All rights reserved.

 

///////////////Training Course,  IN SILICO DRUG DISCOVERY & DESIGNING, INSIGHTS OF PROTEIN-LIGAND INTERACTIONSOct 01, 2016  at Le Méridien Bangalore Hotel,  Bengaluru, India, selectbio

 

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Aug 192016
 

FC 1

Flow Chemistry Society – India Chapter is assisting the proliferation of Process Intensification and Flow Chemistry across the country

After  an  enthusiastic  response  at the  2nd FCS-India Symposium & Workshop held at IICT-Hyderabad  in June’16  with  27companies and 115 delegates attending,  we are happy to announce :

The 3rd   2-day FLOW CHEMISTRY Symposium + DEMO Workshop is organized on 27th – 28th August 2016 at  IISER – PUNE  by Flow Chemistry Society – India Chapter (in collaboration with IISER-Pune,  NCL  & IIT-B) ,  with speakers & demonstrators from India, UK, Netherlands and Hungary.

Prof. Ashwini Kumar Nangia,  Director – CSIR-NCL has kindly consented to be the Hon. Chief Guest and inaugurate the Symposium & Workshop.

Both days have intensive interactive sessions on the theory and industrial applications of Flow Chemistry followed by  livedemonstrations  using              5 to 6 different Flow Reactor platforms –each day  from microliters to 10,000 L/day  industrial scale.

The Fees are Rs. 7,000 for Industry Delegates and Rs. 3,000 for Academic Delegates

The registration form  is BELOW

CLICK FOR REGISTRATION FORM 1-REGISTRATION FORM

contact : vk@pi-inc.co   or   msingh@cipla.com   or    rentala@inkarp.co.in 

Accomodation (optional)  : for Bookings please contact IISER-Pune Guest House directly

Mr. Charu Gurav; Mgr Guest Hse, managergh@iiserpune.ac.in   020-25908130    OR

Mr. Sreejit, Mgr-Catering, etc.    sreejit@iiserpune.ac.in    020-25908247

Tariff  per room night :  Rs. 1,500 (single occupancy) //  Rs. 2,000 (Double Occupancy)

best regards

 Vijay

                             Flow Chemistry Society – India Chapter

Vijay Kirpalani                                                                                      Manjinder Singh
President                                                                                Vice-President
email : vk@pi-inc.co                                                                         email : msingh@cipla.com

Tel: +91-9321342022                                                          Tel: +91-9321342022

CLICK FOR REGISTRATION FORM 1-REGISTRATION FORM

/////////

Day 16 of the 2016 Doodle Fruit Games! Find out more at g.co/fruit

P V SINDHU OF INDIA WINS SILVER AT RIO 2016 OLYMPICS IN BADMINTON

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Aug 192016
 

 

i1Innogen summit India 2016, 18-19 Aug, Mumbai, India, HOTEL HOLIDAY INN, Mumbai International Airport,Organised by Inventicon Business Intelligence Pvt. Ltd………topic is Supergenerics, Innovation in Generics, commercialization, regulatory, other insights,

 

A0 a1

Dr. Ashok Kumar, President – Centre for Research & Development, Ipca Laboratories Ltd, at Innogen summit India 2016, 18-19 Aug, Mumbai, India,, HOTEL HOLIDAY INN, Mumbai International Airport,Organised by Inventicon Business Intelligence Pvt. Ltd — with DR ASHOK KUMAR OF IPCA at Holiday Inn-Mumbai Intl Airport.

 

A2

PANEL DISCUSSION, Dr. Ashok Kumar, President – Centre for Research & Development, Ipca Laboratories Ltd , Dr. Nilima A. Kshirsagar, National Chair Clinical Pharmacology, ICMR Government of India, Yugal Sikri, Chairman – Pharmaceutical Management, School of Business Management, SVKM’s Narsee Monjee Institute of Management Studies — with Yugal Sikri,, Nilima A. Kshirsagarand ASHOK KUMAR OF IPCA at Holiday Inn-Mumbai Intl Airport.

ashit

Ashit sikka, Koji nakamura, Uttam kumar, allfdron TERUMO, AT Innogen summit India 2016, 18-19 Aug, Mumbai, India,, HOTEL HOLIDAY INN, Mumbai International Airport,Organised by Inventicon Business Intelligence Pvt. Ltd — with Koji nakamura of terumo, Ashit Sikka and UTTAM KUMAR OF TERUMO at Holiday Inn-Mumbai Intl Airport.

 

INNO1 INNO3

ROHAN, RIDDHI AND PALLAVI OF INVENTICON

INNO4 S2

DR NIDHI SAPKAL OF ZIMLABS

S3

ALKA LUTHRA OF LUBRIZOL

 

SEEMA1

 

DR SEEMA SINGH, VP AND HEAD,-LEGAL AND IPM, MACLOEDS PHARMA, Innogen summit India 2016, 18-19 Aug, Mumbai, India,, HOTEL HOLIDAY INN, Mumbai International Airport,Organised by Inventicon Business Intelligence Pvt. Ltd — withSeema Singh.

 

lupin cadila

standing Mr Rajeev patil, Sr VP reg affairs Lupin and Mr Sushrut kulkarni Sr VP Zydus cadila, Head, Pharma tech cemtre — with sushrut kulkarni andrajeev patil.

Thanks to

STR1

Rohan Jagtap

Program Manager – Pharma & Lifesciences

 https://ci4.googleusercontent.com/proxy/XM6zLJNVF-KyjTdLe4_K-jsjBvWCfPVibLEfkfFi-qr6U362NxG0XVUkvsdpOUKmwJgUMkzmSETrv9F_bY4Pv0rEVxiUozAcfOcwUjawrQs2stF7iWDvdLcVkMJYElp6G8kNSGlsGwZJsFOoqQTnShF3BCHD=s0-d-e1-ft#https://docs.google.com/a/inventiconasia.com/uc?id=0BxGiCo9okSEbVlRmN0xxM1dpc1E&export=download

Inventicon Business Intelligence Pvt. Ltd.

Phone: +91 22 6511 3334 I Mob: +91 9011052025 Email: rohan.jagtap@inventiconasia.com

Times Square, Unit 1, Level 2, B Wing, Andheri Kurla Road, Andheri (E), Mumbai – 400059, MS – India.

http://inventiconasia.com/About-Us.aspxgards,

AGGENDA

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Aug 172016
 

Osanetant.png

Osanetant (SR-142,801)

160492-56-8 CAS

: MW 605.257582985
Chemical Formula C35H41Cl2N3O2

(R)-(+)-N-[[3-[1-benzoyl-3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)piperidin-3-yl]prop-1-yl]-4-phenylpiperidin-4-yl]-N-methylacetamide

Osanetant (SR-142,801) was a neurokinin 3 receptor antagonist developed by Sanofi-Synthélabo, which was being researched for the treatment of schizophrenia, but was discontinued.[1][2] It was the first non-peptide NK3 antagonist developed in the mid-1990s,[3][4] Other potential applications for osanetant is in the treatment of drug addiction, as it has been found to block the effects ofcocaine in animal models.[5][6]

Developed by Sanofi-Aventis (formerly Sanofi-Synthelabo), osanetant (SR-142801) is an NK3 receptor antagonist which was under development for the treatment of schizophrenia and other Central Nervous System (CNS) disorders. In a review of its R&D portfolio, the company announced in August 2005 that it would cease any further development ofosanetant. This follows an earlier decision to discontinue development of eplivanserin for schizophrenia

(R)-(+)-N-[[3-[1-benzoyl-3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)piperidin-3-yl]prop-1-yl]-4-phenylpiperidin-4-yl]-N-methylacetamide and to a process for their preparation. (R)-(+)-N-[[3-[1-Benzoyl-3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)piperidin-3-yl]prop-1-yl]-4-phenylpiperidin-4-yl]-N-methylacetamide, hereinafter denoted by its International Non-proprietary Name “osanetant”, is the first antagonist of the NK-3 receptor described in the literature, the preparation of which, in particular in the hydrochloride form, is illustrated in EP-A-673 928.
Osanetant.png
According to this document, osanetant is prepared by reacting N-methyl-N-(4-phenylpiperidin-4-yl)acetamide with 1-benzoyl-3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-3-(methanesulfonyloxyprop-1-yl)piperidine and by converting the osanetant thus obtained to its hydrochloride. It has been found that osanetant hydrochloride is isolated in the form of an amorphous solid which is difficult to purify. This product comprises impurities originating from the preceding synthetic stages.
Preparative chromatography starting from osanetant base can be used to obtain osenetant in the pure form.
Osanetant is a neurokinin (NK3) receptor antagonist under development by Sanofi-Synthélabo (formerly Sanofi) as a potential treatment for schizophrenia . Sanofi was originally investigating its potential use as a treatment for psychosis and anxiety . Following phase IIa clinical trials , osanetant entered phase IIb development in February 2001 . Osanetant was the first potent and selective non-peptide antagonist described for the NK3 tachykinin receptor . It has a higher affinity for human and guinea pig NK3 receptors than for rat NK3 receptors . In October 1999, Lehman Brothers predicted that the probability of the product reaching the market was 10%, with a possible launch in 2003 and potential peak sales of US $200 million in 2011 .
 
Sanofi-Aventis CEO, Chris Vihebacher,
PATENT
EP 0673928; FR 2717477; FR 2717478; FR 2719311; JP 1996048669; US 5741910; US 5942523; US 6124316
N-Benzyl-4-hydroxy-4-phenylpiperidine (II) was prepared by addition of phenyllithium to N-benzyl-4-piperidone (I). Carbinol (II) was then converted to acetamide (III) by acid-catalyzed Ritter reaction with acetonitrile. Replacement of the acetamido for an N-Boc group in (III) was effected by acidic hydrolysis of amide (III) to give (IV), followed by treatment with di-tert-butyl dicarbonate. The resultant 1-benzyl-4-(Boc-amino)-4-phenylpiperidine (V) was subjected to catalytic hydrogenolysis in the presence of Pd/C, and the N-debenzylated piperidine (VI) was reprotected as the N-trityl derivative (VII) by treatment with triphenylmethyl chloride and triethylamine. Reduction of the N-Boc group of (VII) by LiAlH4, yielded the N-methyl amine (VIII). After acylation of (VIII) with acetyl chloride to acetamide (IX), its N-trityl group was cleaved by treatment with hot aqueous formic acid to produce the intermediate piperidine (X).
Michael addition of methyl acrylate (XII) to (3,4-dichlorophenyl)acetonitrile (XI) produced the cyano diester adduct (XIII). Catalytic hydrogenation of the cyano group of (XIII) over Raney nickel with concomitant intramolecular cyclization gave rise to the piperidinone (XIV). After basic hydrolysis of the methyl ester function of (XIV), the resultant piperidone propionic acid (XV) was reduced to piperidino alcohol (XVI) by means of borane in THF. Resolution of the racemic piperidine (XVI) employing (+)-camphorsulfonic acid provided the dextro enantiomer (XVII). After N-protection of (XVII) as the Boc derivative (XVIII), its primary alcohol was activated as the corresponding mesylate (XIX) with methanesulfonyl chloride and Et3N. Condensation between mesylate (XIX) and intermediate piperidine (X) in acetonitrile at 60 C, produced (XX). The title benzamido derivative was then obtained by acid-promoted Boc group cleavage in (XX), followed by acylation with benzoyl chloride.
WO 9805640
Bioorg Med Chem Lett 1996,6(19),2307
In a related synthesis, (3,4-dichlorophenyl)acetonitrile (XI) was alkylated with bromide (XXII) –prepared by protection of 3-bromopropanol (XXI) with dihydropyran– to afford (XXIII). Subsequent Michael addition of methyl acrylate (XII) to (XXIII) in the presence of Triton B?gave the cyanoacid (XXIV). This was cyclized to the glutarimide (XXV) by refluxing in HOAc in the presence of H2SO4. Reduction of (XXV) using borane-dimethylsulfide complex produced the already reported racemic piperidinoalcohol (XVI). After acylation of the amine group of (XVI) with benzoyl chloride to yield (XXVI), its hydroxyl group was converted into the target mesylate precursor (XXVII) with methanesulfonyl chloride and Et3N.
An alternative preparation of the precursor 4-(N-methyl-N-acetyl)amino-4-phenylpiperidine (XXXIX) has been reported. The N-benzyl protecting group of piperidine (III) was replaced with an N-Boc group by catalytic hydrogenolysis to (XXXVI), followed by treatment with Boc2O to yield (XXXVII). Amide (XXXVII) alkylation with iodomethane under phase-transfer conditions gave the N-methyl derivative (XXXVIII). Subsequent N-Boc group cleavage in (XXXVIII) was accomplished by using zinc chloride in CH2Cl2 to afford the piperidine-ZnCl2 complex (XXXIX). This was then alkylated with mesylate (XXVII), and the title compound was finally isolated from the racemic mixture by means of preparative chiral HPLC.
In a further method, aminopiperidine (IV) was converted to the formamide (XL) by heating in ethyl formate. Formyl group reduction in (XL) with LiAlH4 provided the N-metyl amine (XLI). The N-benzyl group of (XLI) was then removed by catalytic hydrogenation over Pd/C. Alkylation of the resultant piperidine (XLII) with mesylate (XXVII) gave adduct (XLIII). After acetylation of (XLIII) in neat Ac2O, the racemic mixture was separated by chiral HPLC.
In a further procedure, nitrile (XXIII) was alkylated with ethyl 3-bromopropionate (XXVIII) to give cyano ester (XXIX). Catalytic hydrogenation of the cyano group of (XXIX) gave rise to the piperidinone (XXX), which was further reduced to piperidine (XXXI) with LiAlH4 in THF. Acid deprotection of the tetrahydropyranyl group of (XXXI), followed by resolution with (+)-camphorsulfonic acid, furnished the desired (S)-piperidinoalcohol camphorsulfonate salt (XXXII). Treatment of piperidine (XXXII) with benzoyl chloride in the presence of DIEA yielded benzamide (XXXIII). Conversion of the primary alcohol of (XXXIII) into the desired alkyl iodide (XXXV) was achieved via formation of the mesylate ester (XXXIV), followed by displacement of the mesylate group with KI in refluxing acetone.
Bioorg Med Chem Lett 1997,7(5),555
A new method has been reported. Formamide (XL) was prepared form carbinol (II) by a modified Ritter reaction with cyanotrimethylsilane. Subsequent reduction of (XL) with LiAlH4 gave the N-methyl amine (XLI), which was converted to acetamide (XLIV) by treatment with acetyl chloride. Benzyl group hydrogenolysis in (XLIV) afforded the piperidine (X). Finally, alkylation of piperidine (X) with the chiral alkyl iodide (XXXV) provided the title compound.
Cited Patent Filing date Publication date Applicant Title
US5741910 * Feb 29, 1996 Apr 21, 1998 Sanofi Compounds which are selective antagonists of the human NK3 receptor and their use as medicinal products and diagnostic tools
US5942523 * Feb 29, 1996 Aug 24, 1999 Sanofi Compounds which are selective antagonists of the human NK3 receptor and their use as medicinal products and diagnostic tools
US6040316 * Sep 2, 1997 Mar 21, 2000 Warner-Lambert Company 3-alkyl-3-phenyl-piperidines
US6124316 * May 7, 1999 Sep 26, 2000 Sanofi Compounds which are specific antagonists of the human NK3 receptor and their use as medicinal products and diagnostic tools
Citing Patent Filing date Publication date Applicant Title
US7648992 Jul 4, 2005 Jan 19, 2010 Astrazeneca Ab Hydantoin derivatives for the treatment of obstructive airway diseases
US7655664 Dec 14, 2005 Feb 2, 2010 Astrazeneca Ab Hydantoin derivatives as metalloproteinase inhibitors
US7662845 Aug 7, 2006 Feb 16, 2010 Astrazeneca Ab 2,5-Dioxoimidazolidin-4-yl acetamides and analogues as inhibitors of metalloproteinase MMP12
US7666892 May 5, 2008 Feb 23, 2010 Astrazeneca Ab Metalloproteinase inhibitors
US7700604 Dec 14, 2005 Apr 20, 2010 Astrazeneca Ab Hydantoin derivatives as metalloproteinase inhibitors
US7754750 Jul 13, 2010 Astrazeneca Ab Metalloproteinase inhibitors
US7989620 Aug 2, 2011 Astrazeneca Ab Hydantoin derivatives for the treatment of obstructive airway diseases
US8153673 Jan 26, 2010 Apr 10, 2012 Astrazeneca Ab Metalloproteinase inhibitors
US8183251 Nov 28, 2007 May 22, 2012 Astrazeneca Ab Hydantoin compounds and pharmaceutical compositions thereof
US20080032997 * Dec 14, 2005 Feb 7, 2008 Astrazeneca Ab Novel Hydantoin Derivatives as Metalloproteinase Inhibitors
US20080064710 * Jul 4, 2005 Mar 13, 2008 Astrazeneca Ab Novel Hydantoin Derivatives for the Treatment of Obstructive Airway Diseases
US20080221139 * Nov 28, 2007 Sep 11, 2008 David Chapman Novel Compounds
US20080262045 * May 5, 2008 Oct 23, 2008 Anders Eriksson Metalloproteinase Inhibitors
US20080293743 * Dec 14, 2005 Nov 27, 2008 Astrazeneca Ab Novel Hydantoin Derivatives as Metalloproteinase Inhibitors
US20080306065 * May 6, 2008 Dec 11, 2008 Anders Eriksson Metalloproteinase Inhibitors
US20100144771 * Dec 2, 2009 Jun 10, 2010 Balint Gabos Novel Hydantoin Derivatives for the Treatment of Obstructive Airway Diseases
WO2007106022A2 * Mar 15, 2007 Sep 20, 2007 Astrazeneca Ab A new crystalline form g of (5s) -5- [4- (5-chloro-pyridin-2- yloxy) -piperidine-1-sulfonylmethyl] – 5 -methyl -imidazolidine – 2,4-dione (i) and intermediates thereof.
WO2007106022A3 * Mar 15, 2007 Nov 1, 2007 Astrazeneca Ab A new crystalline form g of (5s) -5- [4- (5-chloro-pyridin-2- yloxy) -piperidine-1-sulfonylmethyl] – 5 -methyl -imidazolidine – 2,4-dione (i) and intermediates thereof.

 

References

  1.  “osanetant Sanofi-Aventis discontinued, France.”. Highbeam.
  2. Kamali, F (July 2001). “Osanetant Sanofi-Synthélabo”. Current opinion in investigational drugs (London, England : 2000). 2 (7): 950–6.PMID 11757797.
  3.  Emonds-Alt, X; Bichon, D; Ducoux, JP; Heaulme, M; Miloux, B; Poncelet, M; Proietto, V; Van Broeck, D; et al. (1995). “SR 142801, the first potent non-peptide antagonist of the tachykinin NK3 receptor”. Life Sciences. 56 (1): PL27–32. doi:10.1016/0024-3205(94)00413-M.PMID 7830490.
  4.  Quartara L, Altamura M (August 2006). “Tachykinin receptors antagonists: from research to clinic”. Current Drug Targets. 7 (8): 975–92.doi:10.2174/138945006778019381. PMID 16918326. Retrieved 2011-04-14.
  5.  Desouzasilva, M; Mellojr, E; Muller, C; Jocham, G; Maior, R; Huston, J; Tomaz, C; Barros, M (May 2006). “The tachykinin NK3 receptor antagonist SR142801 blocks the behavioral effects of cocaine in marmoset monkeys”. European Journal of Pharmacology. 536 (3): 269–78.doi:10.1016/j.ejphar.2006.03.010. PMID 16603151.
  6.  Jocham, Gerhard; Lezoch, Katharina; Müller, Christian P.; Kart-Teke, Emriye; Huston, Joseph P.; De Souza Silva, M. AngéLica (September 2006). “Neurokinin receptor antagonism attenuates cocaine’s behavioural activating effects yet potentiates its dopamine-enhancing action in the nucleus accumbens core”. European Journal of Neuroscience. 24 (6): 1721–32. doi:10.1111/j.1460-9568.2006.05041.x.PMID 17004936.
X Emonds-Alt et al. SR 142801, the first potent non-peptide antagonist of the tachykinin NK3 receptor. Life Sci. 1995, 56(1), PL27-32.
F Kamali. Osanetant Sanofi-Synthélabo. Curr. Opin. Invest. Drugs. 2001, 2(7), 950-956.
L Quartara and M Altamura. Tachykinin receptors antagonists: from research to clinic. Curr. Drug Targets. 2006, 7(8), 975-992.
MA De Souza Silva et al. The tachykinin NK3 receptor antagonist SR142801 blocks the behavioral effects of cocaine in marmoset monkeys. Eur. J. Pharmacol. 2006, 536(3), 269-278.
G Jocham et al. Neurokinin receptor antagonism attenuates cocaine’s behavioural activating effects yet potentiates its dopamine-enhancing action in the nucleus accumbens core. Eur. J. Neurosci. 2006, 24(6), 1721-1732.
Osanetant
Osanetant.png
Systematic (IUPAC) name
N-(1-{3-[(3R)-1-benzoyl-3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)piperidin-3-yl]propyl}-4-phenylpiperidin-4-yl]-N-methylacetamide
Identifiers
CAS Number 160492-56-8 Yes
ATC code none
PubChem CID 219077
IUPHAR/BPS 2110
ChemSpider 189901 
UNII K7G81N94DT Yes
ChEMBL CHEMBL346178 
Chemical data
Formula C35H41Cl2N3O2
Molar mass 606.625 g/mol

///////Osanetant , SR-142,801, 

CC(=O)N(C)C1(CCN(CC1)CCC[C@@]2(CCCN(C2)C(=O)C3=CC=CC=C3)C4=CC(=C(C=C4)Cl)Cl)C5=CC=CC=C5

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Aug 172016
 

Figure imgf000002_0001

AZD1236

CAS 459814-89-2,
MF C15 H19 Cl N4 O5 S.  MW402.85
2,​4-​Imidazolidinedione, 5-​[[[4-​[(5-​chloro-​2-​pyridinyl)​oxy]​-​1-​piperidinyl]​sulfonyl]​methyl]​-​5-​methyl-​, (5S)​-
(5S)-5-[4-(5-chloro-pyridin-2-yloxy)-piperidine-1-sulfonylmethyl]-5-methyl-imidazolidine-2,4-dione
(S)-5-[4-(5-ChIoro-pyridin-2-yloxy)-piperidine-l-suIfonylmethyl]-5-methyl- imidazoIidine-2,4-dione
UNII-B4OQY51WZS; B4OQY51WZS; (S)-5-(((4-((5-Chloropyridin-2-yl)oxy)piperidin-1-yl)sulfonyl)methyl)-5-methylimidazolidine-2,4-dione; AZD1236; AZD-1236;
Piperidine, 4-[(5-chloro-2-pyridinyl)oxy]-1-[[[(4S)-4-methyl-2,5-dioxo-4-imidazolidinyl]methyl]sulfonyl]- (9CI)(5S)-5-[[[4-[(5-Chloro-2-pyridinyl)oxy]-1-piperidinyl]sulfonyl]methyl]-5-methyl-2,4-imidazolidinedione

Mechanism of Action: Matrix metalloproteinase 9 & 12 (MMP9,12) inhibitor MMP9 MMP12i

Anders Eriksson, Matti Lepistö, Michael Lundkvist, af Rosenschöld Magnus Munck,Pavol Zlatoidsky,

Astrazeneca Ab INNOVATOR

UNII-B4OQY51WZS.png

  • OriginatorAstraZeneca
  • Class
  • Mechanism of ActionMatrix metalloproteinase inhibitors
  • Highest Development Phases
  • DiscontinuedChronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Most Recent Events

  • 29 Jul 2010Discontinued – Phase-II for Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Europe (PO)
  • 29 Jul 2010Discontinued – Phase-I for Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Japan (PO)
  • 29 Jul 2010Discontinued – Phase-I for Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Japan (PO)

AZD1236 is a selective MMP-9 and MMP-12 inhibitor (IC50 4.5 and 6.1nM) from Astrazeneca that, since it failed biomarker endpoints for COPD is included in the AZ Open Innovation 2014 set for repurposing. Pending any published link the structure identification is tenatative but seems likely to be the structure crystalised in WO2007106022.

Matrix metallopeptidase 9 and 12 (MMP9|MMP12) inhibitor http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gene/4318; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gene/4321 Preclinical Pharmacology AZD1236 is a potent and reversible inhibitor of human MMP9 and MMP12 (IC50’s = 4.5 and 6.1nM, respectively), with 10 – 15-fold selectivity to MMP2 and MMP13 and >350-fold selectivity to other members of the enzyme family. Its activity is approximately 20- to 50-fold lower at the rat, mouse, and guinea pig orthologues. In acute models of lung injury, AZD1236 inhibited the hemorrhage and inflammation induced by instillation of human MMP12 into rat lungs by ~80% at 0.81 mg/kg, and also abolished macrophage infiltration into BAL fluid induced by tobacco smoke inhalation in the mouse. Safety and Tolerability In healthy human volunteers, AZD1236 was well tolerated in single doses from 2 to 1500 mg and in multiple doses of 15, 75 and 500 mg for periods of up to 13 days. AZD1236 was also well tolerated in COPD patients with moderate to severe disease when given at 75 mg BID for 6 weeks. Pre-clinical toxicology studies of up to 12 month duration have been performed. Toxicologically important findings mainly relate to chronic treatment and included: diffuse eye lens opacities after 6 months administration to rats and fibrodysplasia in the subcutis after 12 months to dogs. Clinical Pharmacology Target coverage data to date have been mixed. In healthy subjects, single dose of 30 or 75 mg inhibited ex vivo zymosanstimmulated whole blood MMP activity (the 75 mg dose yielding plasma compound levels at Cmax steady state of ~120 x IC50). In contrast, 75 mg BID for 6 wks in COPD patients compared to placebo did not identify any significant change in whole blood MMP activity.

 

STR1

PATENT

WO 2002074750 

WO 02/074767 further discloses a specific metalloproteinase inhibitor compound identified therein as (5S)-5-[4-(5-chloro-pyridin-2-yloxy)-piperidine-l-sulfonylmethyl]-5- methyl-imidazolidine-2,4-dione (page 65, lines 15 to 27; and page 120, lines 23 to 29). This compound is designated herein as compound (I).

Figure imgf000002_0001

(I)

WO 02/074767 further discloses processes for the preparation of compound (I). Thus, in one embodiment, compound (I) is prepared by a route analogous to that shown in the following Scheme (WO 02/074767; pages 87, 113 and 120) but substituting the appropriate amine in step (d):

Scheme 1

Figure imgf000003_0001
Figure imgf000003_0002

Reagents and conditions for Scheme 1: a) KCN, (NHLj)2CO3, EtOHTH2O, +900C, 3h;. b) Chiral separation, CHIRALPAK AD, methanol as eluent;. c) Cl2 (g), AcOH/H2O, <+15 0C, 25min; d) Diisopropylethylamine, THF. -20 0C, 30 min.

The obtained compound (I) is then purified either by precipitation and washing with ethanol/water or by preparative HPLC. In a second embodiment, the racemate of compound (I), (5RS)-5-[4-(5-chloro-pyridin-2- yloxy)-piperidine-l-sulfonylmethyl]-5-methyl-imidazolidine-2,4-dione, was prepared by reacting l-[4-(5-chloro-pyridin-2-yloxy)-piperidine-l-sulfonyl]-propan-2-one with an excess of potassium cyanide and ammonium carbonate in ethanol, and isolating the product by precipitation. Compound (I), the (5S)-enantiomer, was then obtained by chiral HPLC (WO 02/074767; pages 55 and 65).

No crystalline forms of compound (I) are disclosed in WO 02/074767.

Compound (I) is a potent metalloproteinase inhibitor, particularly a potent inhibitor of

MMP 12, and as such is useful in therapy. However, when made according to the processes described in WO 02/074767, compound (I) exhibits unpredictable solid state properties with respect to thermodynamic stability. To prepare pharmaceutical formulations containing compound (I) for administration to humans in accordance with the requirements of U.S. and other international health registration authorities, there is a need to produce compound (I) in a stable form, such as a stable crystalline form, having constant physical properties.

str2

PATENT

WO  2007106022

WO 02/074767 further discloses a specific metalloproteinase inhibitor compound identified therein as (5S)-5-[4-(5-chloro-pyridin-2-yloxy)-piperidine-l-sulfonylmethyl]-5- methyl-imidazolidine-2,4-dione (page 65, lines 15 to 27; and page 120, lines 23 to 29). This compound is designated herein as compound (I).

Figure imgf000002_0001

(I)

WO 02/074767 further discloses processes for the preparation of compound (I). Thus, in one embodiment, compound (I) is prepared by a route analogous to that shown in the following Scheme (WO 02/074767; pages 87, 113 and 120) but substituting the appropriate amine in step (d):

Scheme 1

Figure imgf000003_0001
Figure imgf000003_0002

Reagents and conditions for Scheme 1: a) KCN, (NHLj)2CO3, EtOHTH2O, +900C, 3h;. b) Chiral separation, CHIRALPAK AD, methanol as eluent;. c) Cl2 (g), AcOH/H2O, <+15 0C, 25min; d) Diisopropylethylamine, THF. -20 0C, 30 min.

The obtained compound (I) is then purified either by precipitation and washing with ethanol/water or by preparative HPLC. In a second embodiment, the racemate of compound (I), (5RS)-5-[4-(5-chloro-pyridin-2- yloxy)-piperidine-l-sulfonylmethyl]-5-methyl-imidazolidine-2,4-dione, was prepared by reacting l-[4-(5-chloro-pyridin-2-yloxy)-piperidine-l-sulfonyl]-propan-2-one with an excess of potassium cyanide and ammonium carbonate in ethanol, and isolating the product by precipitation. Compound (I), the (5S)-enantiomer, was then obtained by chiral HPLC (WO 02/074767; pages 55 and 65).

No crystalline forms of compound (I) are disclosed in WO 02/074767.

Compound (I) is a potent metalloproteinase inhibitor, particularly a potent inhibitor of

MMP 12, and as such is useful in therapy. However, when made according to the processes described in WO 02/074767, compound (I) exhibits unpredictable solid state properties with respect to thermodynamic stability. To prepare pharmaceutical formulations containing compound (I) for administration to humans in accordance with the requirements of U.S. and other international health registration authorities, there is a need to produce compound (I) in a stable form, such as a stable crystalline form, having constant physical properties.

A preferred process for the synthesis of compound (I) is shown in Scheme 2.

Figure imgf000022_0001

Scheme 2

KCN, (NH4)2CO3

(H) 2-propanol

Figure imgf000022_0002

Chromatography KOBu’

Figure imgf000022_0003

Cl2

AcOH AcOH, H2O

Figure imgf000022_0004

Compound (I)

Figure imgf000022_0005

Recrystallisation EtOH, H2O

Compound (I) Form G

Figure imgf000022_0006

Example 5

(S)-5-[4-(5-ChIoro-pyridin-2-yloxy)-piperidine-l-suIfonylmethyl]-5-methyl- imidazoIidine-2,4-dione Process 1

I5 a) 5-Chloro-2-(piperidin-4-yloxy)-pyridine

5-Chloro-2-(piperidin-4-yloxy)-pyridine acetate (40 g, 0.146 mol) was slurried in iso- PrOAc (664 mL) at 300C. To this slurry was added Na2CO3 (1.5 mol per litre; 196 mL, 2 mol eq.). The slurry was then rapidly stirred at 30 0C for 15 minutes. The biphasic mixture was allowed to settle, and the bottom aqueous phase was separated and discarded.

20 The above base washing procedure was repeated twice more. The organic phase was then washed once with water (200 mL). The resulting iso-VxOAc solution was reduced in volume to approximately 300 mL by distillation under reduced pressure. The solution was then diluted with zsø-PrOAc (400 mL) and again distilled down to approximately 300 mL. This procedure was repeated once more. A sample was removed for analysis of 5-chloro-

25 2-(piperidm-4-yloxy)-pyridine content and water content. The weight or the volume of the solution was measured in order to calculate the concentration of 5-chloro-2-(piperidin-4- yloxy)-pyridme in the Z-PrOAc solution.

fr) rSV5-r4-(5-Chloro-pyridin-2-yloxyVpiperidine-l-sulfonylmethvn-5-methyl- 30 imidazolidine-2 ,4-dione Diisopropylethylamine (24.3 mL, 0.139 mol, 1 mol eq.) was added to the iso-PrOAc solution prepared in part (a) [ca. 300 mL; equivalent to 31.2 g, 0.146 mol, 1.05 mol eq. of 5-chloro-2-(piperidin-4-yloxy)-pyridine] in one portion at RT. The solution was then cooled to -15 °C.

((S)-4-Methyl-2,5-dioxo-imidazolidin-4-yl)-methanesulfonyl chloride (31.65 g, 0.139 mol, 1 mol eq.) was dissolved in dry THF (285 mL) at RT with stirring. The resulting solution was then added to the iso-PrOAc solution of 5-chloro-2-(piperidin-4-yloxy)- pyridine dropwise at -15 0C over about 1.5 h. A precipitate was seen on addition of the ((S)-4-methyl-2,5-dioxo-imidazolidin-4-yl)-methanesulfonyl chloride. At the end of the addition, dry THF (32 mL) was added to the reaction mixture to wash the line and the mixture was stirred for 1 h at — 15 0C. It was then warmed to 20 °C over 1 h and stirred at 20 °C for 1 h further. The reaction was quenched with 10 wt% NaHSO4 (157 mL) with rapid stirring. After about 15 minutes, the biphasic mixture was allowed to settle, and the bottom aqueous phase was separated and discarded. This acid wash procedure was repeated once more. The organic phase was then washed with water (157 mL) using rapid stirring and allowing complete phase separation before partitioning. The reaction solution was then warmed to 40 °C and washed again with water (157 mL). THF (95 mL) was added to the organic layer that was then warmed to 40 0C and filtered at 400C to remove any particulate matter. The solvent volume was then reduced to about 157 mL by reduced pressure distillation with the jacket temperature at 55 °C. zso-PrOAc (317 mL) was then added and the volume was again reduced to about 157 mL. Two more put-and-takes of zsø-PrOAc (317 mL) were carried out. Solids began to precipitate out during the distillations and a suspension resulted. The volume was reduced to about 157 mL each time and after the final distillation a small sample of solvent was then removed from the reaction mixture for residual THF analysis. The 1H NMR showed no THF peaks. The contents of the reaction were then cooled to 0 °C and the product was collected by filtration. The reaction vessel was washed with zsø-PrOAc (63 mL) and this rinse was used to wash the product on the filter. The product was dried overnight in a vacuum oven at 40 °C. The required (S)-5-[4- (5-chloro-pyridin-2-yloxy)-piperidine-l-sulfonyhnethyl]-5-methyl-imidazolidine-2,4-dione was isolated as a white solid in 71% yield (41.8 g).

1H NMR (300MHz, d6-DMSO) δ 10.74 (IH, s), 8.20 (IH, d), 8.01 (IH, s), 7.81 (IH, dd), 6.87 (IH, d), 5.09 (IH, m), 3.52-3.35 (4H, m), 3.13 (2H, m), 2.02 (2H, m), 1.72 (2H, m), 1.33 (3H, s).

Example 6

(S)-5-[4-(5-Chloro-pyridin-2-yloxy)-piperidine-l-sulfonylmethyl]-5-methyl- imidazolidine-2,4-dione Process 2 a) 5-Chloro-2-(piperidm-4-yloxy)-pyridine

5-Chloro-2-(piperidm-4-yloxy)-pyridine acetate (70 g, 257 mmol) was slurried in toluene

(560 mL) at RT. IM NaOH (420 mL) was added and the slurry was then rapidly stirred at RT for 15 min. The biphasic mixture was allowed to settle, and the bottom aqueous phase was separated and discarded. The organic phase was then washed with water (2 x 420 mL). A sample was removed from the organic phase and assayed for 5-chloro-2-(piperidin-

4-yloxy)-pyridine.

The resulting toluene solution was then reduced in volume by distillation at reduced pressure, down to approximately 168 mL (2.4 vol eq. with respect to 5-chloro-2-(piperidin-

4-yloxy)-pyridine acetate charge). The solution was then diluted with toluene (420 mL) and again distilled down to approx 168 mL (2.4 vol eq.). A sample was removed for analysis of water content.

b*) (S)-5-r4-r5-Chloro-pyridm-2-yloxy)-piperidine-l-sulfonylmethvH-5-methyl- imidazolidine-2 ,4-dione

Diisopropylethylamine (38.4 mL, 220 mmol) was added to the toluene solution of 5-chloro-2-(piperidin-4-yloxy)-pyridine obtained in step (a) (containing 236 mmol) in one portion followed by dry THF (151 mL) as a line wash. ((S)-4-Methyl-2,5-dioxo- imidazolidin-4-yl)-methanesulfonyl chloride (48.7 g, 215 mmol) was dissolved in dry THF (352 mL) at RT with stirring. The resulting solution of the sulfonyl chloride was then added dropwise to the toluene/THF solution of 5-chloro-2-(piperidin-4-yloxy)-pyridine and diisopropylethylamine at RT over 1 to 2 h. A precipitate was seen on addition of the sulfonyl chloride. At the end of the addition, dry THF (50 mL) was added to the reaction 5 mixture as a line wash. After the addition was complete, the reaction was stirred for about 30 min at RT.

The reaction was quenched with 10 wt% NaHSO4 (251 mL) with rapid stirring for approx 15 min. The biphasic mixture was allowed to settle, when the bottom aqueous phase was io separated and discarded. This acid wash procedure was repeated once more. The solvent volume was then reduced to about 220 mL by reduced pressure distillation. Toluene (300 mL) was then added and the volume was reduced to about 245 mL Solids begin to precipitate during the distillations and a suspension resulted. After the final distillation, a small sample of solvent was then removed from the reaction mixture for residual THF i5 analysis.

The contents of the reaction mixture were then cooled to 0 °C, stirred for about 30 minutes at this temperature and the product was collected by filtration. The reaction vessel was washed with toluene (100 mL) and this rinse was used to wash the product on the filter. 20 The product was dried in a vacuum oven at 40 0C to constant weight. (S)-5-[4-(5-Chloro- pyridin-2-yloxy)-piperidine-l-sulfonylmethyl]-5-methyl-imidazolidine-2,4-dione was isolated as a white solid in typically 85 to 88% yield over the two steps.

Aerial view of Mölndal

Patent

WO 2003106689

Paul Hudson, President, AstraZeneca U.S. and Executive Vice President, North America, joined by AstraZeneca volunteers to celebrate the AstraZeneca Hope Lodge’s fifth birthday.

Paul Hudson, President, AstraZeneca U.S. and Executive Vice President, North America, joined by AstraZeneca volunteers to celebrate the AstraZeneca Hope Lodge’s fifth birthday.

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Astra boss Pascal Soriot

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Massachusetts Economic Development Secretary Jay Ash (left) congratulates Kumar Srinivasan, Head of AstraZeneca R&D Boston (right), at a ceremony to launch AstraZeneca’s Gatehouse Park BioHub.

Massachusetts Economic Development Secretary Jay Ash (left) congratulates Kumar Srinivasan, Head of AstraZeneca R&D Boston (right), at a ceremony to launch AstraZeneca’s Gatehouse Park BioHub.

 

 

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References
1. AstraZeneca. 
AZD1236.
Accessed on 31/10/2014. Modified on 31/10/2014. Open Innovation, http://openinnovation.astrazeneca.com/what-we-offer/compound/azd1236/
2. Dahl R, Titlestad I, Lindqvist A, Wielders P, Wray H, Wang M, Samuelsson V, Mo J, Holt A. (2012)
Effects of an oral MMP-9 and -12 inhibitor, AZD1236, on biomarkers in moderate/severe COPD: a randomised controlled trial.
Pulm Pharmacol Ther25 (2): 169-77. [PMID:22306193]

https://ncats.nih.gov/files/AZD1236.pdf

AZD1236

WO1992001062A1 * Jul 4, 1991 Jan 23, 1992 Novo Nordisk A/S Process for producing enantiomers of 2-aryl-alkanoic acids
WO1996021640A1 * Jan 16, 1996 Jul 18, 1996 Teva Pharmaceutical Industries, Ltd. Optically active aminoindane derivatives and preparation thereof
WO2002074767A1 * Mar 13, 2002 Sep 26, 2002 Astrazeneca Ab Metalloproteinase inhibitors
WO2003093260A1 * Apr 29, 2003 Nov 13, 2003 Biogal Gyogyszergyar Rt. Novel crystal forms of ondansetron, processes for their preparation, pharmaceutical compositions containing the novel forms and methods for treating nausea using them
WO2003094919A2 * May 12, 2003 Nov 20, 2003 Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. Novel crystalline forms of gatifloxacin
EP0175312A2 * Sep 14, 1985 Mar 26, 1986 Kanegafuchi Kagaku Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Process for preparing optically active hydantoins
EP0255390A2 * Jul 30, 1987 Feb 3, 1988 MediSense, Inc. Rhodococcus bacterium for the production of aryl acylamidase
EP0442584A1 * Feb 14, 1991 Aug 21, 1991 Dsm N.V. Process for the preparation of an optically active amino acid amide
EP0580210A1 * Jul 6, 1993 Jan 26, 1994 Dsm N.V. Process for the preparation of optically active methionine amide
EP0909754A1 * Oct 13, 1998 Apr 21, 1999 Eli Lilly And Company Process to make chiral compounds
EP1550725A1 * Jun 5, 2003 Jul 6, 2005 Kaneka Corporation PROCESS FOR PRODUCING OPTICALLY ACTIVE alpha-METHYLCYSTEINE DERIVATIVE
US4983771 * Sep 18, 1989 Jan 8, 1991 Hexcel Corporation Method for resolution of D,L-alpha-phenethylamine with D(-)mandelic acid
US20040044215 * Aug 28, 2003 Mar 4, 2004 Alain Alcade Crystalline forms of osanetant
US20040266832 * Jun 24, 2004 Dec 30, 2004 Li Zheng J. Crystal forms of 2-(3-difluoromethyl-5-phenyl-pyrazol-1-yl)-5-methanesulfonyl pyridine
Reference
1 * HIRRLINGER B. ET AL.: ‘Purification and properties of an amidase from Rhodococcus erythropolis MP50 which enantioselectively hydrolyzes 2-arylpropionamides‘ JOURNAL OF BACTERIOLOGY vol. 178, no. 12, June 1996, pages 3501 – 3507, XP001174103
2 * See also references of EP2064202A2
Citing Patent Filing date Publication date Applicant Title
US7625934 Dec 1, 2009 Astrazeneca Ab Metalloproteinase inhibitors
US7772403 Mar 15, 2007 Aug 10, 2010 Astrazeneca Ab Process to prepare sulfonyl chloride derivatives
Patent ID Date Patent Title
US2011003853 2011-01-06 Metalloproteinase Inhibitors
US7754750 2010-07-13 Metalloproteinase Inhibitors
US7625934 2009-12-01 Metalloproteinase Inhibitors
US7427631 2008-09-23 Metalloproteinase inhibitors
US2004147573 2004-07-29 Metalloproteinase inhibitors

US20110038532011-01-06Metalloproteinase InhibitorsUS77547502010-07-13Metalloproteinase InhibitorsUS76259342009-12-01Metalloproteinase InhibitorsUS20092216402009-09-03Novel Crystal ModificationsUS74276312008-09-23Metalloproteinase inhibitorsUS20041475732004-07-29Metalloproteinase inhibitors

///////AZD1236,  AZD-1236, AZD 1236,

O=S(=O)(C[C@@]1(C)NC(=O)NC1=O)N3CCC(Oc2ccc(Cl)cn2)CC3

Day 13 of the 2016 Doodle Fruit Games! Find out more at g.co/fruit

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Aug 172016
 

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Piramal Enterprises Limited announced that its wholly owned subsidiary in the U.S. has entered into an agreement to acquire 100 percent stake in Ash Stevens Inc., a U.S.-based contract development and manufacturing organization (CDMO), in an all cash deal for a consideration of USD $42.95 million plus an earn-out consideration capped at $10 million. This potential transaction is expected to be completed by the end of August.

Located in Riverview, Michigan, Ash Stevens has over 50 years of experience in contract manufacturing, and serves several biotech, mid-size pharma, and large pharmaceutical clients worldwide.

With over 60,000 sq. ft. of facilities, eight chemical drug development and production laboratories, and six full-scale production areas, Ash Stevens has built a stellar reputation, led by science, driven by operational excellence, and one that emphasizes quality as a culture. As one of the leaders in HPAPI manufacture, Ash Stevens has an impeccable safety record of working with high potency anti-cancer agents and other highly-potent therapeutics. The state-of-the-art manufacturing facility in Michigan features all necessary engineering and containment controls for the safe handling and cGMP manufacture of small and large-scale HPAPIs, with Occupational Exposure Limits (OELs) ≤ 0.1µg/m3. The facility has approvals from U.S., EU, Australia, Japan, Korea, and Mexico regulatory agencies.

“The acquisition of Ash Stevens fits well with our strategy to build an asset platform that offers value to our partners and collaborators. Currently, around 25 percent of the molecules in clinical development are potent. Our clients are looking for reliable partners that can assist them in advancing these programs forward,” said Vivek Sharma, CEO of Piramal Pharma Solutions. He further adds, “North America is a key market that we can now service with our three local facilities – the Coldstream Labs in Kentucky for fill finish needs, the Torcan facility in Toronto for complex high value APIs and now, Ash Stevens in Michigan for HPAPIs. Having facilities with a differentiated platform and geographical proximity to clients are keys towards building strategic partnerships. We expect this acquisition to also be synergistic with our Antibody Drug Conjugates (ADCs) and injectable business. We can now fulfill client requirements for a single source of supply for both high potent APIs and drug products.”

“With its rich history of scientific excellence, a track record of 12 product launches, Ash Stevens is well poised to become the partner of choice for clients looking to advance programs from early development through launch. In addition to the business benefits that the combined entity will bring to our clients, I am also pleased that the firms share common core values: both were founded by successful entrepreneurs, value integrity, and are committed to a customer-first approach,” said Dr. Mark Cassidy, President of the API Business at Piramal Pharma Solutions. “I am pleased to welcome the Ash Stevens team into the Piramal group. We expect them to be an integral part of our future growth plans.”

Added Dr. Stephen Munk, CEO of Ash Stevens, “We look forward to working with the Piramal leadership and management team, to develop API solutions that benefit customers and improve the lives of patients. The commitment that Piramal has shown towards growing its healthcare businesses, coupled with the complementary capabilities that our two firms have, makes this an exciting time for Ash Stevens and our employees. We have already identified areas where we can create significant value together, and will be moving forward rapidly to achieve those objectives.”

The transaction is not subject to any regulatory approvals. No related party of PEL has any interest in Ash Stevens.

Wells Fargo Securities, LLC served as exclusive financial advisor to Ash Stevens, with legal counsel provided by Morrison & Foerster LLP.

For further information on the financials, please visit our website: www.piramal.com.

Dr. Stephen A. Munk, President and CEO of Ash Stevens Inc.
Large scale reactor train with 2000, 3000, and 4000 L glass-lined reactors equipped with split butterfly valves.
Ash Stevens’ down draft kilo suite with low temperature capability.

Ajay Piramal

The Piramal family's purposeful philanthropy

From left: Anand Piramal, executive director, Piramal Group; Swati Piramal, vice-chairperson, Piramal Group; Ajay Piramal, chairman, Piramal Group; Nandini Piramal, executive director, Piramal Enterprises; and Peter DeYoung, president, Piramal Enterprises

 

////////////CDMO,  Ash Stevens, Piramal Enterprises, Stephen A. Munk

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Aug 162016
 

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ULIXERTINIB

4-(5-chloro-2-isopropylaminopyridin-4-yl)-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid[1-(3-chlorophenyl)-2-hydroxyethyl]amide

Molecular Formula: C21H22Cl2N4O2
Molecular Weight: 433.33098 g/mol

BVD-523; BVD-ERK; BVD-ERK/HM; BVD-ERK/ST; VRT-0752271; VRT-752271; VX-271, V

уликсертиниб ,  أوليكسيرتينيب  , 优立替尼 ,
4-[5-chloro-2-(isopropylamino)-4-pyridyl]-N-[(1S)-1-(3-chlorophenyl)-2-hydroxy-ethyl]-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxamide
CAS 869886-67-9
ULIXERTINIB HCl
Molecular Weight 469.79
Formula C21H22Cl2N4O2●HCl
 CAS  1956366-10-1
Chemical Name 1H-Pyrrole-2-carboxamide, 4-[5-chloro-2-[(1-methylethyl)amino]-4-pyridinyl]-N-[(1S)-1-(3-chlorophenyl)-2-hydroxyethyl]-,hydrochloride(1:1)

Ulixertinib malonate

4-(5-chloro-2-isopropylaminopyridin-4-yl)-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid[1-(3-chlorophenyl)-2-hydroxyethyl]amide (referred to as ulixertinib malonate)

  • Originator Vertex Pharmaceuticals
  • Developer BioMed Valley Discoveries
  • Class Aminopyridines; Antineoplastics; Pyrroles; Small molecules
  • Mechanism of Action Mitogen activated protein kinase 3 inhibitors; Mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 inhibitor

Highest Development Phases

  • Phase I/II Acute myeloid leukaemia; Cancer; Myelodysplastic syndromes
  • Phase I Pancreatic cancer

Most Recent Events

  • 01 Mar 2016 Phase-I clinical trials in Pancreatic cancer (Combination therapy, First-line therapy, Metastatic disease) in USA (PO) (NCT02608229)
  • 23 Nov 2015 BioMed Valley Discoveries and Washington University School of Medicine plan a phase Ib trial for Pancreatic cancer (First-line therapy, Metastatic disease, Combination therapy) (PO) (NCT02608229)
  • 01 Nov 2014 Phase-I/II clinical trials in Acute myeloid leukaemia (Second-line therapy or greater) and Myelodysplastic syndromes (Second-line therapy or greater) in USA (NCT02296242) (PO)

INTRODUCTION

Ulixertinib is in phase I/II clinical trials for the treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), myelodysplasia and advanced solid tumors.

Members of the family of B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 proteins (BCL-2) are apoptosis regulators. These proteins control mitochondrial outer

membrane permeabilization (MOMP). Expression of BCL-2 protein blocks cell death in response to various cellular injuries. A number of cancers, including melanoma, breast, prostate, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and lung cancer, may be caused by damage to the BCL-2 gene. Mutations in BCL-2 may also be a cause of resistance to cancer treatments. Unfortunately, resistance can quickly develop using conventional BCL-2 inhibitor therapies to treat cancer.

Extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) are protein kinases that are involved in cell cycle regulation, including the regulation of meiosis, mitosis, and postmitotic functions in differentiated cells. Disruption of the ERK pathway is common in cancers. However, to date, little progress has been made developing effective ERK inhibitors for the treatment of cancer.

As the understanding of the molecular basis of cancer grows, there is an increased emphasis on developing drugs that specifically target particular nodes in pathways that lead to cancer. In view of the deficiencies noted above, there is, inter alia, a need for effective molecularly targeted cancer treatments, including combination therapies. The present invention is directed to meeting these and other needs.

Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways mediate signals which control diverse cellular processes including growth, differentiation, migration, proliferation and apoptosis. One MAPK pathway, the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway, is often found to be up-regulated in tumors. Pathway members, therefore, represent attractive blockade targets in the development of cancer therapies (Kohno and Pouyssegur, 2006). For example, U.S. Patent No. 7,354,939 B2 discloses, inter alia, compounds effective as inhibitors of ERK protein kinase. One of these compounds, 4-(5-Chloro-2-isopropylaminopyridin-4-yl)-1 H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid [1 -(3-chlorophenyl)-2-hydroxyethyl]amide, is a compound according to formula (I):

Pharmaceutical compositions are often formulated with a crystalline solid of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). The specific crystalline form of the API can have significant effects on properties such as stability and solubility / bioavailability. Instability and solubility characteristics can limit the ability to formulate a composition with an adequate shelf life or to effectively deliver a desired amount of a drug over a given time frame (Peterson et al., 2006).

Synergistic combination comprising an ERK1/2 inhibitor (such as ulixertinib) and a BCL-2 family inhibitor (such as navitoclax), assigned to BioMed Valley Discoveries (BVD), naming Decrescenzo and Welsch. BVD, presumably under license from Vertex, is developing ulixertinib (phase 2 trial), a small-molecule ERK 1/2 inhibitor for treating cancers including acute myelogenous leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. In June 2015, clinical data were presented at the 51st ASCO meeting in Chicago, IL.

BIOMED VALLEY DISCOVERIES

PATENT

WO2005113541 PDT PATENT

I-9 COMPD

SEE BELOW

PATENT

WO-2016123574

Novel crystalline forms of 4-(5-chloro-2-isopropylaminopyridin-4-yl)-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid[1-(3-chlorophenyl)-2-hydroxyethyl]amide (referred to as ulixertinib) can be prepared which exhibit improved properties, eg surprisingly improved stability and solubility characteristics. Also claimed is their use for treating cancer.

EXAMPLE 2

Preparation of Crystaline Free Base 4-(5-Chloro-2-isopropylaminopyridin-4-yl)-1 H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid [1 -(3-chlorophenyl)-2-hydroxyethyl]amide

4-(5-Chloro-2-isopropylaminopyridin-4-yl)-1 H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid [1 -(3-chlorophenyl)-2-hydroxyethyl]amide free base was prepared according to the following synthesis scheme.

Stepl


C5H2CIFIN

257.43 C8H10CIIN2

ASYM-11 1606 296.54

ASYM-1 12060

ASYM-111938 ASYM-112393

ASYM-1 11935

In Step 1 , a clean and dry 200 L glass-lined reactor was evacuated to <-0.08 MPa, and then filled with nitrogen to normal pressure three times. Anhydrous ethanol (49.90 kg) was charged into the 200 L glass-lined reactor. ASYM-1 1 1606 (Asymchem) (12.70 kg) and isopropylamine (29.00 kg) were added into the mixture in turn. The mixture was heated to 65-75°C for refluxing. The mixture reacted at 65-75°C. After 20 h, the reaction was sampled and analyzed by HPLC every 4-6 h until the content of ASYM-1 1 1606 was <1 %. The mixture was cooled to 40-45°C and was concentrated at <45°C under reduced pressure (<-0.08 MPa) until 13-26 Lremained. The organic phase was washed with a sodium chloride solution and was stirred for 20-30 min and settled for 20-30 min before separation. The organic phase was concentrated at <30°C under reduced pressure (<-0.06 MPa) until 13-20 L remained. Petroleum ether (8.55 kg) was added into the concentrated mixture. The mixture was transferred into a 20 L rotary evaporator and continued concentrating at <30°C under reduced pressure (<-0.06 MPa) until 13-20 L remained. Then petroleum ether (8.55 kg) was added into the concentrated mixture. The mixture was cooled to 0-5°C and stirred for crystallization. After 1 h, the mixture was sampled and analyzed by wt% every 1 -2 h until the wt% of the mother liquor was <1 1 % or the change of the wt% between consecutive samples was <1 %. The mixture was filtered with a 10 L filter flask. The filter cake was sampled and analyzed for purity by HPLC. 10.50 kg of product was recovered as a brownish yellow solid at 99.39% purity.

In Step 2, a clean and dry 300 L glass-lined reactor was evacuated to <-0.08 MPa, and then filled with nitrogen to normal pressure three times. Glycol dimethyl ether (73.10 kg) was charged into the 300 L glass-lined reactor at 20-30°C. ASYM-1 12060 (Asymchem) (10.46 kg) and ASYM-1 1 1938 (Asymchem) (12.34 kg, 1 1 .64 kg after corrected) were added into the mixture in turn under the protection of nitrogen. Maintaining the temperature at 20-30°C, purified water (10.50 kg) and anhydrous sodium carbonate (5.67 kg) were added into the mixture. Palladium acetate (0.239 kg) and tricyclohexylphosphonium tetrafluoroborate (0.522 kg) were added into the mixture under the protection of nitrogen. After addition, the mixture was evacuated to <-0.06 MPa, and then filled with nitrogen to normal pressure. This was repeated for ten times until residual oxygen was <300 ppm. The mixture was heated to 75-85°C for refluxing. The mixture reacted at 75-85°C. After 4 h, the mixture was sampled and analyzed by HPLC every 2-3 h for content of ASYM-

1 12060. The content of AS YM-1 12060 was 6.18%, so additional ASYM-1 1 1938 (0.72 kg) was added and continued reaction until the content of ASYM-1 12060 was <3%. The mixture was cooled to 25-35°C and filtered with a 30 L stainless steel vacuum filter. The filter cake was soaked and washed twice with THF (14.10kg). The filtrate and washing liquor were combined and concentrated at <50°C under reduced pressure (<-0.08 MPa) until 10-15 L remained. The mixture was cooled to 15-25°C. Methanol (1 1 .05 kg) was added into the concentrated mixture. Then the mixture was stirred for crystallization. After 2 h, the mixture was sampled and analyzed by HPLC every 2-4 h until the wt% of the mother liquor was <2%. The mixture was filtered with a 30 L stainless steel vacuum filter. The filter cake was soaked and washed twice with methanol (8.30 kg). The filter cake was transferred into a 50 L plastic drum. Then ethyl acetate (7.10 kg) and petroleum ether (46.30 kg) were added into the drum. The mixture was stirred for 1.5-2 h and then filtered with a nutsche filter. The filter cake was soaked and washed with petroleum ether (20.50 kg). The filter cake was dried in the nutsche filter under nitrogen at 30-40°C. After 8 h, the solid was sampled and Karl Fischer (KF) analysis was performed in intervals of 4-8 h to monitor the drying process. Drying was completed when the KF result was <1 .0% water. During drying, the solid was turned over and mixed every 4-6 h. 12.15 kg of product was recovered as a brownish yellow solid at 98.32% purity.

In Step 3, a clean and dry 300 L glass-lined reactor was evacuated to <-0.08 MPa, and then filled with nitrogen to normal pressure three times. THF (62.58 kg) was charged into the 300 L glass-lined reactor at 15-30°C. Then the stirrer was started. ASYM-1 12393 (12.00 kg, 1 1 .70 kg after corrected) was added into the mixture. The mixture was stirred until the solid dissolved completely. Maintaining the temperature at 15-30°C, a lithium hydroxide solution which was

prepared with lithium hydroxide monohydrate (5.50 kg) in purified water (70.28 kg) was added into the mixture. Then diethylamine (3.86 kg) was added. The mixture was heated to 60-70°C for refluxing. The mixture reacted at 60-70°C. After 30 h, the reaction was sampled and analyzed by HPLC every 4-6 h until the content of intermediate at relative retention time (RRT)=1 .39-1 .44 was <1 % and the content of ASYM-1 12393 was <1 %. HPLC conditions for this analysis are set forth in Table 1 .

Table 1 : HPLC Parameters

The mixture was cooled to 25-35°C and MTBE (25.97 kg) was added into the mixture. The mixture was stirred for 20-30 min and filtered via an in-line fluid filter. The filtrate was transferred into a 300 L glass-lined reactor and settled for 20-30 min before separation. The pH of the obtained aqueous phase was adjusted with a 6 N hydrochloric acid solution which was prepared from concentrated hydrochloric acid (14.86 kg) in purified water (10.88 kg) at the rate of 5-8 kg/h at 15-25°C until the pH was 1 -2. The pH of the mixture was adjusted again with a saturated sodium carbonate solution which was prepared from sodium carbonate (5.03 kg) in purified water (23.56 kg) at the rate of 3-5 kg/h at 15-25°C until the pH was 6.4-6.7. Then the pH of the mixture was adjusted with a hydrochloric acid solution which was prepared from concentrated hydrochloric acid (1 .09 kg) in purified water (0.80 kg) until the pH was 6.2-6.4. The mixture was filtered with a nutsche filter. The filter cake was transferred into a 300 L glass-lined reactor and purified water (1 17.00 kg) was added. The mixture was stirred and sampled and analyzed by HPLC until the p-toluenesulfonic acid residue of the filter cake was <0.5%. Then the mixture was filtered. The filter cake was dried in the tray drier under nitrogen at 55-65°C until KF<10%. The solid and MTBE (8.81 kg) were charged into a 50 L stainless steel drum. The mixture was stirred for 1 -2 h. The mixture was filtered with a 30 L stainless steel vacuum filter. The filter cake was dried in the nutsche filter at 50-60°C. After 8 h, the solid was sampled and analyzed by KF every 4-8 h until KF<5%. During drying, the solid was turned over and mixed every 4-6 h. 6.3 kg of product was recovered as an off-white solid at 98.07% purity.

In Step 4, a dry and clean 50 L flask was purged with nitrogen for 20 min. DMF (30.20 kg) was charged into the 50 L flask reactor. Then the stirrer was started. Maintaining the temperature at 15-25°C, ASYM-1 12394 (3.22 kg, 2.76 kg after corrected) was added into the mixture. The mixture was stirred until the solid dissolved completely. The mixture was cooled to -10 to -20°C and 1 -hydroxybenzotriazole hydrate (2.10 kg) was added into the mixture at -10 to -20°C. Then EDCI (2.41 kg) was added into the mixture in five portions at an interval of about 5-10 min. The mixture was cooled to -20 to -30°C and ASYM-1 1 1888 (Asymchem) (1 .96 kg) was added into the mixture at -20 to -30°C. Then DIEA (1 .77 kg) was added into the mixture at the rate of 3-4 kg/h. The mixture was heated to 15-25°C at the rate of 5-10°C/h. The mixture was reacted at 15-25°C. After 6-8 h, the mixture was sampled and analyzed by HPLC every 2-4 h until the content of ASYM-1 12394 was <2%. The mixture was cooled to 0-10°C and the reaction mixture was quenched with a solution which was prepared from ethyl acetate (28.80 kg) in purified water (12.80 kg) at 0-10°C. The mixture was extracted three times with ethyl acetate (28.80 kg). For each extraction the mixture was stirred for 20-30 min and settled for 20-30 min before separation. The organic phases were combined and washed twice with purified water (12.80 kg). The mixture was stirred for 20-30 min and settled for 20-30 min before separation for each time. Then the obtained organic phase was filtered through an in-line fluid filter. The filtrate was transferred into a 300 L glass-lined reactor. The mixture was washed twice with a 5% acetic acid solution, which was prepared from acetic acid (2.24 kg) in purified water (42.50 kg). The solution was added at the rate of 10-20 kg/h. The organic phase was washed twice with a sodium carbonate solution, which was prepared from sodium carbonate (9.41 kg) in purified water (48.00 kg). The organic phase was washed twice with a sodium chloride solution, which was prepared from sodium chloride (16.00 kg) in purified water (44.80 kg). The organic phase was transferred into a 300 L glass-lined reactor. Anhydrous sodium sulfate (9.70 kg) was added into the mixture and the mixture was stirred for 2-4 h at 15-30°C. The mixture was filtered with a nutsche filter, which was pre-loaded with about 1 cm thick silica gel (7.50 kg). The filter cake was soaked and washed with ethyl acetate (14.40 kg) before filtration. The filtrates were combined and the combined filtrate was added into a 72 L flask through an in-line fluid filter. The mixture was concentrated at T≤40°C under reduced pressure (P<-0.08 MPa) until 3-4 L remained. Then MTBE (4.78 kg) was added into the mixture. The mixture was cooled to 0-10°C for crystallization with stirring. After 1 h, the mixture was sampled and analyzed by wt% every 1-2 h until the wt% of the mother liquor was <5% or the change of wt% between consecutive samples was <1%. The mixture was filtered with a vacuum filter flask and the filter cake was dried in the tray drier under nitrogen at 30-40°C until KF<0.5%. 3.55 kg of product was recovered as an off-white solid at 100% purity.

EXAMPLE 3A

Preparation of 4-(5-Chloro-2-isopropylaminopyridin-4-yl)-1 H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid [1 -(3-chlorophenyl)-2-hydroxyethyl]amide Form C

4-(5-Chloro-2-isopropylaminopyridin-4-yl)-1 H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid [1 -(3-chlorophenyl)-2-hydroxyethyl]amide Form C was prepared from 4-(5-Chloro-2-isopropylaminopyridin-4-yl)-1 H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid [1 -(3-chlorophenyl)-2-hydroxyethyl]amide free base as follows. ASYM-1 1 1935 (10.4 kg) was added to a stirred mixture of anhydrous ethanol (73.9 kg), methanol (4.1 kg) and isopropanol (4.1 kg). The mixture was heated to 70-75°C and stirred until all the solids dissolved. Anhydrous HCI (37 wt%, 1 .1 eq) in a mixture of ethanol/methanol/isopropanol (90:5:5) was added and the mixture maintained at 70-75°C for 2 hours after the addition was completed. The mixture was then cooled to 15-25°C at a rate of 5-15°C per hour and stirred at this temperature until the desired polymorphic purity was reached. The end point of the crystallization/polymorph conversion was

determined by the absence of an XRPD peak at about 10.5° 2Θ in three successive samples.

The mixture was then filtered and washed successively with a pre-prepared solution of anhydrous ethanol (14.8 kg), methanol (0.8 kg) and isopropanol (0.8 kg), followed by MTBE (2 x 21 kg). Avoidance of delay in the washing of the filter cake is preferable because the polymorph may be unstable in the wet filter cake in the presence of reagent alcohol and improved stability was observed after the MTBE wash has been performed. The wet filter cake was then dried in a heated filter funnel or a tray drier at 40-50°C until dry. Typical yields were about 85-90%.

EXAMPLE 3B

Alternative Preparation of 4-(5-Chloro-2-isopropylaminopyridin-4-yl)-1 H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid [1 -(3-chlorophenyl)-2-hydroxyethyl]amide Form C

ASYM-1 15985

4-(5-Chloro-2-isopropylaminopyridin-4-yl)-1 H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid [1 -(3-chlorophenyl)-2-hydroxyethyl]amide Form C was also prepared from 4-(5-Chloro-2-isopropylaminopyridin-4-yl)-1 H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid [1 -(3-chlorophenyl)-2-hydroxyethyl]amide free base as follows. A dry and clean 72 L flask was purged with nitrogen for 20 min. Anhydrous ethanol (21 .35 kg) methanol (1 .17 kg) and isopropanol (1 .19 kg) were charged into the 72 L flask at 15-25°C and the mixture was stirred for 20-30 min. ASYM-1 1 1935 (3.01 kg) was added into the mixture and heated to 70-75°C at the rate of 15-25°C/h and stirred until the solid dissolved completely.

An alcohol / HCI solution was prepared as follows. Anhydrous ethanol (1.500 kg) methanol (0.088 kg) and isopropanol (0.087 kg) were charged into a 5 L flask at 15-25°C and the mixture was stirred for 20-30 min. The mixture was bubbled with hydrogen chloride through a dip tube under stirring at 10-25°C. After 2 h, the mixture was sampled and analyzed every 2-4 h until the wt% of hydrogen chloride was > 35%.

The alcohol / HCI solution (0.519 kg) prepared above was added dropwise into the mixture at the rate of 0.5-1.0 kg/h at 70-75°C. Seed crystal (0.009 kg) was added into the mixture and the alcohol / HCI solution (0.173 kg) prepared above was added into the mixture at the rate of 0.5-1 .0 kg/h at 70-75°C. After addition, the mixture was stirred for 1 -2 h at 70-75°C. The mixture was cooled to 15-25°C at the rate of 5-15°C/h and stirred for 4-6 h. The mixture was heated to 70-75°C at the rate of 15-25°C/h and stirred for 8-10 h at 70-75°C. The mixture was cooled to 15-25°C at the rate of 5-15°C/h and stirred for 4-6 h. The mixture was filtered with a vacuum filter flask. The filter cake was soaked and rinsed with a solution which was prepared from anhydrous ethanol (4.25 kg) and methanol (0.24 kg) and isopropanol (0.24 kg) before filtration. The filter cake was dried in a drying room under nitrogen at 40-50°C until the ethanol residue was <0.5% and methanol residue was <0.3% and isopropanol residue was <0.3%. 2.89 kg of product was recovered as a white solid at 99.97% purity.

PATENT

WO-2016123581

Novel crystalline malonate salt forms of 4-(5-chloro-2-isopropylaminopyridin-4-yl)-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid[1-(3-chlorophenyl)-2-hydroxyethyl]amide (referred to as ulixertinib malonate) and composition comprising them. Also claimed is their use for treating cancer.

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2016123581&redirectedID=true

EXAMPLE 6

Aqueous Disolution of 4-(5-Chloro-2-isopropylaminopyridin-4-yl)-1 H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid [1-(3-chlorophenyl)-2-hydroxyethyl]amide Malonate Form A

Samples of 4-(5-Chloro-2-isopropylaminopyridin-4-yl)-1 H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid [1 -(3-chlorophenyl)-2-hydroxyethyl]amide Form C and 4-(5-Chloro-2-isopropylaminopyridin-4-yl)-1 H-pyrrole-2 -carboxylic acid [1 -(3-chlorophenyl)-2-hydroxyethyl]amide malonate Form A were each shaken at ambient temperature in fasting state simulated gastric fluid (FaSSGF) pH 1.6 for 30 minutes. Concentration of 4-(5-Chloro-2-isopropylaminopyridin-4-yl)-1 H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid [1 -(3-chlorophenyl)-2-hydroxyethyl]amide was measured at 5, 15 and 30 minutes.

After 30 minutes, the samples were removed from FaSSGF, placed in fasting state simulated intestinal fluid (FaSSIF) pH 6.5, with shaking, for an additional 5 hours. Concentration of 4-(5-Chloro-2-isopropylaminopyridin-4-yl)-1 H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid [1 -(3-chlorophenyl)-2-hydroxyethyl]amide was measured at 10, 30, 60 90, 120, 180, 270, and 300 minutes. Results are summarized in Table 13 and shown in FIG. 10A (FaSSGF) and FIG. 10B (FaSSIF).

Table 13: Solubility of 4-(5-Chloro-2-isopropylaminopyridin-4-yl)-1 H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid [1 -(3-chlorophenyl)-2-hydroxyethyl]amide Form C and Malonate Form A.

PATENT

WO2016123574

PATENT

WO2015095834

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2015095834&redirectedID=true

PATENT

WO2005113541

STR1

 

Example 1 Compound 1-9 was prepared as follows:

Figure imgf000040_0001

1-9

2,2,2-TrichIoro-l-(4-iodo-lH-pyrrol-2-yl)ethanone: To a stirred solution of 50 g (235 mmol, 1.0 equiv.) of 2,2,2-trichloro-l-(lH-pyrrol-2-yl)-ethanone in dry dichloromethane (400 mL) under nitrogen, a solution of iodine monochloride (39 g, 240 mmol, 1.02 equivalents) in of dichloromethane (200 mL) was added dropwise. The resulting mixture was stirred at room temperature for 2 hours. The solution was washed with 10% potassium carbonate, water, 1.0 M sodium thiosulfate, saturated sodium chloride, dried over sodium sulfate, filtered, and concentrated under reduced pressure. The solid was recrystallized from hexanes/methyl acetate to afford the title compound (68.5g, 86%) as a colorless solid (86%). MS FIA: 335.8, 337.8 ES-.

4-Iodo-lH-pyrrole-2-carboxyIic acid methyl ester: To a stirred solution of 2,2,2- trichloro-l-(4-iodo-lH-pyrrol-2-yl)ethanone (68g, 201 mmol, 1.0 equivalent) in dry methanol (400 mL) under nitrogen, was added a solution of sodium methoxide in methanol (4.37 M, 54 mL, 235 mmol, 1.2 equivalents) over 10 minutes. The resulting mixture was stirred at room temperature for 1 hour. The volatiles were removed under reduced pressure and the crude was then partitioned between water and tert- butylmethyl ether. The organic phase was separated, washed two times with water, saturated sodium chloride, dried over sodium sulfate, filtered and concentrated under vacuum to afford the title compound (48g, 96%) as a colorless solid, that was used directly without further purification.

4-Iodo-l-(toluene-4-sulfonyl)-lH-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid methyl ester: 4-Iodo- lH-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid methyl ester (24.6 g, 98 mmol, 1.0 equivalent) was dissolved in dichloromethane (150 mL) and triethylamine (30 mL, 215.6 mmol, 2.2 equivalents). 4-(Dimethylamino)pyridine (1.2 g, 9.8 mmol, 0.1 equivalent) and p- toluenesulfonylchloride (20.6 g, 107.8 mmol, 1.1 equivalents) were added and the reaction mixture was stirred for 16 hours at room temperature. The reaction was quenched with 1 M ΗC1 and the organic layer was washed with aqueous sodium bicarbonate and brine. After drying over magnesium sulfate, the solvent was removed under reduced pressure and the residue was crystallized from tert-butylmethyl ether, yielding the title compound as a pale yellow solid (30 g, 75%). Rt(min) 8.259 minutes.

4-(4,4,5,5-Tetramethyl-[l,3,2]dioxaborolan-2-yI)-l-(toluene-4-sulfonyl)-lH- pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid methyl ester: To a degassed solution of 4-iodo-l- (toluene-4-sulfonyl)-lH-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid methyl ester (20 g, 49.4 mmol, 1.0 equivalent) and bis(pinacolato)diborane (15 g, 65 mmol, 1.3 equivalents) in DMF (200 mL) under nitrogen, was added dichloro[l,l ‘- bis(diphenylphosphino)ferrocene]palladium (II) dichloromethane adduct (3.6 g, 4.9 mmol, 0.1 equivalent). The reaction mixture was then stirred at 80 °C for 18 hours. After removing the DMF under reduced pressure, the resulting thick oil residue was suspended in diethyl ether (500 mL) and a solid precipitated immediately. This solid was removed by filtration and the filtrate was washed with IM HCl, water, brine and dried over MgS0 . Concentration afforded the title compound as a white solid and used without further purification (10 g, 50%). LC/MS: Rt(min) 4.6; 406.4 ES+. MS FIA: 406.2 ES+. ‘pfNMR δ 1.2 (s, 12H), 2.35 (s, 3H), 3.8 (s, 3H), 7.2 (m, 3H), 7.8 (d, 2H), 8.0 (s, IH).

N,N’-2-(5-Chloro-4-iodo-pyridyI)-isopropyIarnine:

Method A. (Microwave)

In a 10 mL microwave tube, 5-chloro-2-fluoro-4-iodopyridine (1.0 g, 3.9 mmol, 1.0 equivalent) was dissolved in DMSO (4.0 mL) and then ispropylamine (0.99 mL, 11.7 mmol, 3.0 equivalents) was added. The tube was sealed and placed under microwave irradiation for 600 sec at 150 °C. This reaction was repeated six times. The reaction mixtures were combined, then diluted in ethyl acetate and washed with water. After drying over sodium sulfate, the solvent was evaporated to afford the title compound as a thick brown oil (5.6 g, 80% ) which was used directly without further purification. Rt(min) 4.614; MS FIA: 296.9 ES+. ‘pfNMRsssssss δ 1.25 (d, 6H), 3.65 (m, IH), 7.15 (s, IH), 7.75 (s, IH).

Method B: (Thennal)

5-Chloro-2-fluoro-4-iodopyridine (400 mg, 1.55 mmol, 1.0 equivalent) was dissolved in ethanol (5.0 mL) and then isopropylamine (0.66 mL, 7.8 mmol, 5.0 equivalents) was added. The resulting solution was stirred at 80 °C for 48 hours. The reaction mixture was then diluted in ethyl acetate and washed with water. After drying over sodium sulfate, the solvent was evaporated and a thick brown oil was obtained, which was then purified by flash chromatography on silica gel eluting with mixtures of hexanes/ethyl acetate (from 99:1 to 80:20) to afford the title compound as a pale yellow solid (96 mg, 21%).

4-(5-Chloro-2-isopropylaminopyridin-4-yl)-l-(toluene-4-suIfonyl)-lH-pyrrole-2- carboxylic acid methyl ester: To a solution of N,N’-2-(5-chloro-4-iodo-pyridyl)- isopropylamine (0.53 g, 1.8 mmol, 1.0 equivalent) and 4-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl- [l,3,2]dioxaborolan-2-yl)-l-(toluene-4-sulfonyl)-lH-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid methyl ester (0.78 g, 1.8 mmol, 1.0 equivalent) in DME (4.0 mL) was added a solution of aqueous 2 M sodium carbonate (1.0 mL) followed by Pd(PPh3)4 (0.21 mg, 0.18 mmol, 0.1 equivalent). The microwave tube was sealed and the reaction mixture was irradiated by microwave for 1800 sec. at 170 °C. The cmde of six reactions were combined and diluted in ethyl acetate and washed with water. After drying the organic layer with sodium sulfate, the solvent was removed and the resulting thick oil was adsorbed on silica gel. The crude was then purified by flash chromatography on silica, eluting with hexanes/ethyl acetate mixtures (from 99:1 to 70:30) to afford the title compound as a yellow solid (3.1 g, 61% over two steps). Rt(min) 6.556. MS FIA: 448.1 ES+. ‘HNMR δ 1.45 (d, 6H), 2.5 (s, 3H), 3.81 (s, 3H), 6.8 (s, IH), 7.35 (s, IH),

7.4 (d, 2H), 8.0 (m ,3H), 8.3 (s, IH).

4-(5-Chloro-2-isopropylaminopyridin-4-yl)-l-(2,4,6-trimethylbenzenesulfonyl)- lH-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid methyl ester: To a solution of N,N’-2-(5-chloro-4- iodo-pyridyl)-isopropylamine (96 mg, 0.32 mmol, 1.0 equivalent) and 4-(4,4,5,5- tetramethyl-[ 1 ,3,2]dioxaborolan-2-yl)- 1 -(2,4,6-trimethylbenzenesulfonyl)- lH-pyrrole- 2-carboxylic acid methyl ester (152 mg, 0.35 mmol, 1.1 equivalents) in DME (2 mL), was added a solution of aqueous 2 M sodium carbonate (0.2 mL) followed by Pd(PPh ) (37 mg, 0.032 mmol, 0.1 equivalent). The reaction mixture was stirred at 80 °C for 16 hours. The crude was diluted in ethyl acetate and washed with water. After drying the organic layer with sodium sulfate, the solvent was removed and the resulting thick oil was adsorbed on silica gel. The cmde was then purified by flash chromatography on silica, eluting with hexanes/ethyl acetate mixtures (from 99:1 to 80:20) to afford the title compound as a yellow solid (65 mg, 43%). Rt(min) 7.290. MS FIA:476.1 ES+.

4-(5-Chloro-2-isopropylaminopyridin-4-yl)-lH-pyrrole-2-carboxyIic acid:

Method A. (Microwave)

A solution of 4-(5-chloro-2-isopropylaminopyridin-4-yl)-l-(toluene-4-sulfonyl)-lH- pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid methyl ester (3.1 g, 6.9 mmol, 1.0 equivalent) in TΗF (2.0 mL) was added to a solution of lithium hydroxide monohydrated (710 mg, 17.3 mmol,

2.5 equivalents) in water (3.0 mL). The microwave tube was sealed and the reaction mixture was irradiated by microwave for 1200 sec. at 150 °C. The cmde solution was acidified with aqueous 6Ν ΗC1. The solvent was evaporated off to afford the title compound which was used directly without further purification. Rt(min): 3.574. FIA MS: 279.9 ES+; 278.2 ES-.

Method B: (Thermal)

A solution of 4-(5-chloro-2-isopropylaminoρyridin-4-yl)-l-(2,4,6- trimethylbenzenesulfonyl)-lH-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid methyl ester (0.69 g, 1.4 mmol, 1.0 equivalent) in TΗF (3.0 mL) was added to a solution of lithium hydroxide monohydrated (1.19 g, 29 mmol, 20.0 equivalents) in water (3.0 mL). The mixture was then refluxed for 8 hours. The cmde solution was acidified with aqueous 6N ΗC1 until cloudy, the organic solvent was partially removed and the product precipitated. The title compound was isolated by filtration and washed with water and diethyl ether, yielding a white solid (0.38 g, 96%).

4-(5-Chloro-2-isopropylaminopyridin-4-yl)-lH-pyrrole-2-carboxyIic acid [l-(3- ch!orophenyl)-2-hydroxyethyl] amide: To a suspension of 4-(5-chloro-2- isopropylaminopyridin-4-yl)-lH-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid (1.93 g, 6.9 mmol, 1.0 equivalent) in DMF (5.0 mL) was added EDCI (1.45 g, 7.6 mmol, 1.1 equivalents), ΗOBt (0.94 g, 6.9 mmol, 1.0 equivalent) and (5)-3-chlorophenylglycynol (1.58 g, 7.6 mmol, 1.1 equivalents). Dusopropylethylamme (2.7 mL) was then added and the resulting mixture was stirred a room temperature overnight. The mixture was then poured into water and extracted with ethyl acetate. After drying over sodium sulfate, the solvent was removed and the crude was adsorbed on silica gel. Purification was effected by flash chromatography on silica, eluting with mixtures of hexanes/acetone (from 80:20 to 60:40) to afford the title compound as white solid (1.9 g, 64%). Rt(min) 4.981s. FIA MS: 433.1 ES+; 431.2 ES-. 1ΗNMR (CD3OD) δ 1.31 (d, 6H), 3.85 (m, 3H), 5.15 (t, IH), 7.01 (s, IH), 7.25 (m, 3H), 7.4 (s, IH), 7.45 (s, IH), 7.7 (s, IH), 7.95 (s, IH).

Example 2 Compound 1-9 was also prepared according to following alternate method:

Figure imgf000045_0001

2,5-DichIoro-4-nitropyridine N-oxide: To a suspension of 2-chloro-5-chloropyridine (10 g, 0.067 mol) in acetic anhydride (25 mL) was added hydrogen peroxide 30% (25 mL) in small portions. This mixture was stirred at room temperature for 24 hours and then heated at 60 °C for 30 hours. After removing the excess of acetic acid under reduced pressure, the residue was added in small portions to concentrated sulfuric acid (15 mL). The resulting solution was added to a mixture of concentrated sulfuric acid (15 mL) and fuming nitric acid (25 mL) and then heated at 100 °C for 90 minutes. The reaction mixture was poured on ice, neutralized with solid ammonium carbonate and finally with aqueous ammonia until a basic pH was obtained and. A precipitate formed. The precipitate was collected by filtration to afford the title compound as a pale yellow solid (3.1 g), Rt(min) 3.75. MS FIA shows no peak. ‘pfΝMR (DMSO-de) δ 8.78 (s, IH), 9.15 (s, IH).

4-Bromo-2-chloro-5-N-isopropylpyridin-2-amine N-oxide: To 2,5-dichloro-4- nitropyridine Ν-oxide (400 mg, 1.9 mmol) was added acetyl bromide (2 mL) very slowly. The reaction mixture was then heated at 80 °C for 10 minutes. The solvent was removed under a stream of nitrogen and the cmde product was dried under high vacuum. The cmde material (165 mg, 0.62 mmol) was dissolved in ethanol (2 mL), zso-propylamine (0.53 mL) added and the resulting mixture was heated at 80 °C for 2 hours. The cmde solution was then purified by reversed phase HPLC (acetonitrile/water/TFA 1%) to afford the title compound as a pale yellow solid (60 mg, 36.6%). Rt(min) 5.275. MS FIA264.8, 266.9 ES+.

4-(5-chloro-2-isopropylaminopyridin-4-yl)-lH-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid [l-(3- chlorophenyl)-2-hydroxyethyl] amide (1-9): 4-Bromo-2-chloro-5-N- isopropylpyridin-2-amine N-oxide (25 mg, 0.094 mmol, 1.0 equivalent) and 4- (4,4,5, 5-tetramethyl-[l,3,2]dioxaborolan-2-yl)-l-(2,4,6-trimethylbenzensulfonyl)-lH- pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid methyl ester (39 mg, 0.094 mmol, 1.0 equivalent) were dissolved in benzene (5 mL) then aqueous 2M Νa2C03 (1 mL) and Pd(PPh3)4 (115.6 mg, 0.1 mmol, 0.2 equivalent) were added and the resulting suspension was heated at reflux at 80 °C for 16 hours. The reaction mixture was diluted in ethyl acetate, washed with water and dried over anhydrous sodium sulfate to afford 4-(5-chloro-2- isopropylamino-pyridin-4-yl)- 1 -(2,4,6-trimethyl-benzenesulfonyl)- lH-pyrrole-2- carboxylic acid methyl ester N-oxide (R (min) 6.859. MS FIA: 492.0 ES+) which was then treated with a 2 M solution of PC13 in dichloromethane (1 mL) at room temperature. After 10 minutes, the solvent was removed under a stream of nitrogen and the cmde oil was dissolved in methanol (1 mL) and aqueous 1 M ΝaOΗ (1 mL). The resulting mixture was heated at reflux for 16 hours then the cmde solution was acidified using aqueous 1 M ΗC1 and the solvent was removed. The resulting 4-(5- chloro-2-isopropylamino-pyridin-4-yl)-lΗ-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid (R (min) 3.527. MS FIA: 279.4 ES+; 278.2 Es-) was suspended in DMF (3 mL) together with EDCI (36 mg, 0.19 mmol, 2 equivalents), HOBt (26 mg, 0.19 mmol, 2 equivalents), (S)-3- chlorophenylglycinol HCl salt (59 mg, 0.28 mmol, 3 equivalents) and DIEA (0.12 mL, 0.75 mmol, 8 equivalents). The resulting mixture was stirred at room temperature for 16 hours. The reaction mixture was diluted in ethyl acetate, washed with water and dried over sodium sulfate. After removing the solvent under reduced pressure, the cmde product was purified by reversed phase HPLC (acetonitrile/water/TFA 1%) to afford the title compound as a white solid (4.8 mg, 8.1%).

PATENT

US20150512092015-02-19COMPOUNDS AND COMPOSITIONS AS INHIBITORS OF MEK

US73549392008-04-08Pyrrole inhibitors of ERK protein kinase, synthesis thereof and intermediates thereto

Research scientist Tony Huang works in a laboratory at Vertex Pharmaceuticals Inc. in San Diego

REFERENCES

1 . Kohno M, Pouyssegur J (2006) Targeting the ERK signaling pathway in cancer therapy. Ann Med 38: 200-21 1 .

2. Kuby, J., Immunology, 3rd Ed., W.H. Freeman & Co., New York.

3. Lee DC, Webb ML(2003) Pharmaceutical Analysis. John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York: 255-257.

4. Peterson ML, Hickey MB, Zaworotko MJ and Almarsson O (2006) Expanding the Scope of Crystal Form Evaluation in Pharmaceutical Science. J Pharm Pharmaceut Sci 9(3):317-326.

5. Pierce Catalog and Handbook, 1994-1995; Pierce Chemical Co., Rockford, III.

6. Remington, The Science and Practice of Pharmacy (21 st Edition, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, Philadelphia, PA.

7. The United States Pharmacopeia-National Formulary, The United States Pharmacopeial Convention, Rockville, MD.

Gabriel Martinez-Botella

Gabriel Martinez-Botella

Gabriel Martinez-Botella

Director, Chemistry at Sage Therapeutics

Experience

Director, Chemistry

Sage Therapeutics

July 2012 – Present (4 years 2 months)

Principal Scientist, Team Leader

AstraZeneca

March 2008 – July 2012 (4 years 5 months)

Sr Scientist

Vertex Pharmaceuticals

2002 – 2008 (6 years)

Education

Queen Mary, U. of London

PhD

1996 – 1999

R Bonnett

Universitat de Barcelona

1990 – 1995

PIC NOT AVAILABLE

Michael R Hale

Director
Ra Pharmaceuticals, Cambridge · Medicinal Chemistry

 

///////////ULIXERTINIB, BVD-523; BVD-ERK,  BVD-ERK/HM,  BVD-ERK/ST,  VRT-0752271,  VRT-752271,  VX-271, уликсертиниб ,أوليكسيرتينيب  ,优立替尼 , PHASE 2,  Vertex Pharmaceuticals, BioMed Valley Discoveries, UNII:16ZDH50O1U,  869886-67-9 

CC(C)NC1=NC=C(C(=C1)C2=CNC(=C2)C(=O)NC(CO)C3=CC(=CC=C3)Cl)Cl

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Aug 142016
 

.

High throughput screening techniques (HTS) are fast and efficient alternatives to evaluate enzymatic activities. Here, this technique is applied to obtain enantiomeric excess and conversions values with chiral fluorogenic probes and a non fluorogenic competitor, which was named Quick-ee. The fluorescent signal reveals of the enantioselectivity of the enzyme. Details are presented in the Article High Throughput Enzymatic Enantiomeric Excess: Quick-ee by Maria L. S. de O. Lima, Caroline C. da S. Gonçalves, Juliana C. Barreiro, Quezia Bezerra Cass and Anita Jocelyne Marsaioli on page 319.

http://dx.doi.org/10.5935/0103-5053.20140282

Cover Article

J. Braz. Chem. Soc. 2015, 26(2), 319-324

High Throughput Enzymatic Enantiomeric Excess: Quick-ee

Maria L. S. O. Lima; Caroline C. S. Gonçalves; Juliana C. Barreiro; Quezia B. Cass; Anita J. Marsaioli

Lima MLSO, Gonçalves CCS, Barreiro JC, Cass QB, Marsaioli AJ. High Throughput Enzymatic Enantiomeric Excess: Quick-ee.J. Braz. Chem. Soc. 2015;26(2):319-324

/////////////High Throughput,  Enzymatic,  Enantiomeric Excess,  Quick-ee

http://jbcs.sbq.org.br/imagebank/pdf/v26n2a14.pdf

http://jbcs.sbq.org.br/imagebank/pdf/v26n2a14-Sup01.pdf

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Aug 132016
 

A key pharmaceutical intermediate (1) for production of edivoxetine·HCl was prepared in >99% ee via a continuous Barbier reaction, which improves the greenness of the process relative to a traditional Grignard batch process. The Barbier flow process was run optimally by Eli Lilly and Company in a series of continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) where residence times, solventcomposition, stoichiometry, and operations temperature were optimized to produce 12 g h−1crude ketone 6 with 98% ee and 88% in situ yield for 47 hours total flow time. Continuous salt formation and isolation of intermediate 1 from the ketone solution was demonstrated at 89% yield, >99% purity, and 22 g h−1 production rates using MSMPRs in series for 18 hours total flow time. Key benefits to this continuous approach include greater than 30% reduced process mass intensity and magnesium usage relative to a traditional batch process. In addition, the flow process imparts significant process safety benefits for Barbier/Grignard processes including >100× less excess magnesium to quench, >100× less diisobutylaluminum hydride to initiate, and in this system, maximum long-term scale is expected to be 50 L which replaces 4000–6000 L batch reactors.

 

A continuous flow Barbier reaction was employed for the production of a key pharmaceutical intermediate (1) in the synthesis of edivoxetine·HCl (a highly selective norepinephrine re-uptake inhibitor).

US scientists from Eli Lilly and Company and D&M Continuous Solutions, led by Michael Kopach, report the development of a continuous Barbier reaction which preserves chirality and the product obtained in >99% ee.  The team ran the process in a series of continuous stirred tank reactors, where residence time, solvent composition, stoichiometry and operations temperature were optimised to produce 12 g per hour of the ketone precursor to 1 with 98% ee and 88% in situ yield for 47 hours total flow time.  Continuous salt formation and isolation of 1 could then be achieved from the ketone solution with >99% purity.

This process offers up several significant advantages over a traditional Grignard batch process.  This continuous flow method gave greater than 30% reduced process mass intensity and magnesium usage relative to the batch method.  Equally, the flow process resulted in >100 x less excess magnesium to quench and >100 x less diisobutylaluminum hydride to initiate giving significant safety benefits.  The authors expect that the maximum long-term scale of the process is 50 L which would replace 4000-6000 L batch reactors.

 

Continuous Flow Barbier Reaction

Figure 2. Continuous Barbier Laboratory Setup

For 100 years, Grignard reactions have been one of the most powerful and effi cient organic chemistry methodologies for C-C bond formation. However, Grignard reactions are also among the most challenging reactions from both operational and potential safety issues due to initiation diffi culties and runaway potential. A close variation to the Grignard reaction is the Barbier reaction wherein the Grignard reagent is prepared in the presence of an electrophile resulting in the immediate consumption of the Grignard. A Barbier reaction using a CSTR was developed for a key pharmaceutical intermediate in production of edivoxetine·HCl (Scheme 4) [9]. In the fl ow setup (Figure 2), solid magnesium is sequestered in the fi rst tank where the Grignard initiation event takes place. CSTR 2 was used as an aging tank and CSTR 3 was the quench tank. CSTRs were used for Grignard reaction rather than a PFDR because of the solid Mg reagent.

Scheme 4: Barbier Reaction to form Ketone 15

Continuous reaction improved process safety, product quality, and process greenness. The continuous reaction achieved >99% ee in situ versus 95% ee batch because of immediate conversion of unstable intermediate. Solvent volumes were reduced 30%. The safety hazards were reduced by decreasing the reactor size by 50X, which reduced chemical potential and also increased heat transfer surface area per unit volume by 4X. DIBAL-H initiating agent was reduced by more than 100X, and excess Mg that must be quenched at the end of reaction was almost eliminated. When run continuously, the commercial scale Grignard formation reactor was expected to be 50L, which replaces 4000-6000L batch reactor.

The continuous flow Barbier reaction: an improved environmental alternative to the Grignard reaction?

*Corresponding authors
aChemical Product Research and Development, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, USA
E-mail: kopach_michael@lilly.com
bD&M Continuous Solutions, Indianapolis, USA
Green Chem., 2012,14, 1524-1536

DOI: 10.1039/C2GC35050E

http://pubs.rsc.org/en/Content/ArticleLanding/2012/GC/C2GC35050E#!divAbstract

Three vessel Grignard CSTR process train.

Grignard synthesis of compound 1.

 

Retrosynthesis of edivoxetine·HCl.

Flow diagram for the whole continuous process from amide 3 to product 1.

 

Continuous crystallization of compound 1.

Distillation and continuous crystallization of compound 1.

Entry, Rxn temp. (°C), Vol. ratio THF–toluene (%), Conversion (%), ee (%)

//////////The continuous flow,  Barbier reaction,  improved environmental alternative,  Grignard reaction, FLOW SYNTHESIS

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Aug 132016
 

str1

Abstract Image

Efficient continuous Grignard and lithiation processes were developed to produce one of the key regulatory starting materials for the production of edivoxetine hydrochoride. For the Grignard process, organometallic reagent formation, Bouveault formylation, reduction, and workup steps were run in continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTRs). The lithiation utilized a hybrid approach where plug flow reactors (PFRs) were used for the metal halogen exchange and Bouveault formylation steps, while the reduction and workup steps were performed in CSTRs. Relative to traditional batch processing, both approaches offer significant advantages. Both processes were high-yielding and produced the product in high purity. The two main processes were directly compared from a number of perspectives including reagent and operational safety, fouling potential, process footprint, need for manual operation, and product yield and purity.

Flow Grignard and Lithiation: Screening Tools and Development of Continuous Processes for a Benzyl Alcohol Starting Material

Small Molecule Design and Development, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, Indiana 46285, United States
D&M Continuous Solutions, LLC, Greenwood, Indiana 46143, United States
Org. Process Res. Dev., Article ASAP

 

 

//////////Flow Grignard,  Lithiation, Screening Tools,  Development, Continuous Processes,  Benzyl Alcohol, Starting Material

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