AUTHOR OF THIS BLOG

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO, WORLDDRUGTRACKER
Nov 302016
 

Abstract Image

An efficient process for the preparation of 1-(2-methoxyphenoxy)-2,3-epoxypropane, a key intermediate for the synthesis of ranolazine is described.

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/suppl/10.1021/op300056k

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Preparation of 1-(2-Methoxyphenoxy)-2,3-epoxypropane 4.

To a stirring solution of 2-methoxy phenol 2 (10 kg, 80.55 mol) and water (40 L) at about 30 °C was added sodium hydroxide (1.61 kg, 40.25 mol) and water (10 L). After stirring for 30−45 min, epichlorohydrin 3 (22.35 kg, 241.62 mol) was added and stirred for 10−12 h at 25−35 °C. Layers were separated, and water (40 L) was added to the organic layer (bottom layer) containing product. Sodium hydroxide solution (3.22 kg, 80.5 mol) and water (10 L) were added at 27 °C and stirred for 5−6 h at 27 °C.

The bottom product layer was separated and washed with sodium hydroxide solution (3.0 kg 75 mol) and water (30 L). Excess epichlorohydrin (3) was recovered by distillation of the product layer at below 90 °C under vacuum (650−700 mmHg) to give 13.65 kg (94%) of title compound with 98.3% purity by HPLC, 0.2% of 2- methoxy phenol 2, 0.1% of epichlorohydrin 3, 0.1% of chlorohydrin 11, 0.3% of dimer 12 and 0.3% of dihydroxy 13.

1 H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3, δ) 6.8−7.0 (m, 4H), 4.3 (dd, J = 5.6 Hz, 5.4 Hz, 1H), 3.8 (dd, J = 5.6 Hz, 5.3 Hz, 1H), 3.7 (s, 3H), 3.2−3.4 (m, 1H), 2.8 (dd, J = 5.6 Hz, 5.4 Hz, 1H), 2.7 (dd, J = 5.6 Hz, 5.3 Hz, 1H);


IR (KBr, cm−1 ) 2935 (C−H, aliphatic), 1594 and 1509 (CC, aromatic), 1258 and 1231 (C−O−C, aralkyl ether), 1125 and 1025 (C−O−C, epoxide);


MS (m/z) 181 (M+ + H).



Compound Details

Properties
MWt 180.2
MF C10H12O3


CAS 2210-74-4

Glycidyl 2-methoxyphenyl ether
Guaiacol glycidyl ether

1H NMR PREDICT

13C NMR PREDICT

COSY PREDICT

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CREDIT……….http://www.molbase.com/en/synthesis_2210-74-4-moldata-95563.html

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RakeshwarBandichhor

DR REDDYS LABORATORIES

An Efficient Synthesis of 1-(2-Methoxyphenoxy)-2,3-epoxypropane: Key Intermediate of β-Adrenoblockers

 Innovation Plaza, IPD, R&D, Dr. Reddy’s Laboratories Ltd., Survey Nos. 42, 45,46, and 54, Bachupally, Qutubullapur – 500073, Andhra Pradesh, India

 Institute of Science and Technology, Center for Environmental Science, JNT University, Kukatpally, Hyderabad – 500 072, Andhra Pradesh, India

Org. Process Res. Dev.201216 (10), pp 1660–1664

DOI: 10.1021/op300056k

Publication Date (Web): September 14, 2012

Copyright © 2012 American Chemical Society

*Telephone: +91 4044346000. Fax: +91 4044346285. E-mail: rakeshwarb@drreddys.com.

////////////////1-(2-Methoxyphenoxy)-2,3-epoxypropane,  β-Adrenoblockers, ranolazine


COc2ccccc2OCC1CO1



OTHER COMPD

Glycidyl 2-methylphenyl ether technical grade, 90%


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Nov 282016
 

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Homogeneous Enantioselective Catalysis in a Continuous-Flow Microreactor: Highly Enantioselective Borohydride Reduction of Ketones Catalyzed by Optically Active Cobalt Complexes

Department of Chemistry, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522, Japan
Hitachi Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., 832-2 Horiguchi, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-0034, Japan
§ Hitachi Plant Technologies, Ltd., 603 Kandatsu-machi, Tsuchiura, Ibaraki 300-0013, Japan
Org. Process Res. Dev., 2012, 16 (6), pp 1235–1240
DOI: 10.1021/op300061k

Abstract

Abstract Image

Highly enantioselective homogeneous catalysis under continuous-flow conditions was established for the cobalt-catalyzed borohydride reduction of tetralone derivatives. A microreactor allowed higher reaction temperature with the residence time of 12 min than the corresponding batch system to maintain enantioselectivity as well as reactivity. The present system was directly applied to gram-scale synthesis to afford the reduced product with 92% ee.

////////////Homogeneous Enantioselective Catalysis,  Continuous-Flow Microreactor, Highly Enantioselective Borohydride, Reduction of Ketones Catalyzed,  Optically Active Cobalt Complexes

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Nov 242016
 

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Figure

Characterization Data of Compound 7

Mp: 118–120 °C. MS (M + H+): 314.
HRMS (ESI) m/z: Calcd for C16H15N3NaO4, (M + Na+): 336.0960. Found: 336.0899.
IR (KBr) ν/cm–1: 3447, 3339, 1717, 1714, 1699, 1594.
1H NMR (CDCl3, 400 MHz) δ/ppm: 8.50 (s, 1H, Ar–H), 7.88 (d, J = 8.8 Hz, 1H, Ar–H), 7.76 (d, J = 7.6 Hz, 1H, Ar–H), 7.60 (d, J = 8.0 Hz, 1H, Ar–H), 7.54 (t, J = 7.2 Hz, 1H, Ar–H), 7.41 (t, J = 7.2 Hz, 1H, Ar–H), 6.71 (d, J = 9.2 Hz, 1H, Ar–H), 6.28 (br s, 2H, −NH2), 3.91 (s, 3H, −CH3), 3.89 (s, 3H, −CH3).
13C NMR (CDCl3, 100 MHz) δ/ppm: 168.2, 168.0, 152.9, 151.6, 143.4, 131.7, 131.2, 129.4, 128.8, 128.0, 126.3, 118.9, 117.1, 109.8, 52.3, 51.9.

 

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Continuous-Flow Diazotization for Efficient Synthesis of Methyl 2-(Chlorosulfonyl)benzoate: An Example of Inhibiting Parallel Side Reactions

National Engineering Research Center for Process Development of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients, Collaborative Innovation Center of Yangtze River Delta Region Green Pharmaceuticals, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014, P. R. China
Key Laboratory for Green Pharmaceutical Technologies and Related Equipment of Ministry of Education, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014, P. R. China
Org. Process Res. Dev., Article ASAP
DOI: 10.1021/acs.oprd.6b00238
Publication Date (Web): November 17, 2016
Copyright © 2016 American Chemical Society
*Tel.: (+86)57188320899. E-mail: pharmlab@zjut.edu.cn.

Abstract

Abstract Image

An expeditious process for the highly efficient synthesis of methyl 2-(chlorosulfonyl)benzoate was described, which involved the continuous-flow diazotization of methyl 2-aminobenzoate in a three-inlet flow reactor via a cross joint followed by chlorosulfonylation in the tandem tank reactor. The side reaction such as hydrolysis was decreased eminently from this continuous-flow process even at a high concentration of hydrochloric acid. The mass flow rate of methyl 2-aminobenzoate was 4.58 kg/h, corresponding to an 18.45 kg/h throughput of diazonium salt solution. The potential of inhibiting parallel side reactions by conducting in a flow reactor was successfully demonstrated in this method.

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Nov 242016
 

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Generics: The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently published a new Guidance regarding Prior Approval Supplements (PAS). Read more about FDA´s Guidance for Industry “ANDA Submissions – Prior Approval Supplements Under GDUFA“.

http://www.gmp-compliance.org/enews_05634_Generics-FDA%B4s-New-Guidance-on-Prior-Approval-Supplements_15721,Z-RAM_n.html

On October 14, 2016, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published a new Guidance regarding Prior Approval Supplements (PAS).
FDA says that “this guidance is intended to assist applicants preparing to submit to FDA prior approval supplements (PASs) and amendments to PASs for abbreviated new drug applications (ANDAs)”.

Specifically, the guidance describes how the Generic Drug User Fee Amendments of 2012 (GDUFA) performance metric goals apply to:

  • A PAS subject to the refuse-to-receive (RTR) standards;
  • A PAS that requires an inspection;
  • A PAS for which an inspection is not required;
  • An amendment to a PAS;
  • Other PAS-related matters.

GDUFA is designed to speed the delivery of safe and effective generic drugs to the public and reduce costs to industry. That requires that FDA and human generic drug manufacturers meet certain requirements and commitments. “FDA committed to review and act on a certain percentage of PASs within a specified period from the date of submission for receipts in fiscal year (FY) 2015 through FY 2017. The percentage of PASs that FDA has committed to review and act on increases with each fiscal year; the deadlines for review also depend on whether consideration of a PAS requires an inspection.”

Changes to an approved application:
The criteria laid down in FDA regulations for submitting information as a PAS (major change), as a Changes Being Effected-Supplement (CBE-supplement, moderate change), or in an annual report (minor change) were not changed by GDUFA.

Timelines depending on inspections for PAS submissions:
The GDUFA goal date for a PAS depends on whether the PAS requires an inspection. If a PAS does not require an inspection, the goal date is 6 months from the date of submission; but if a PAS requires an inspection, the goal date is 10 months from the date of submission. An initial goal date of 6 months occasionally may change to a 10-month goal date if, during the review, FDA determines an inspection is necessary. If an amendment is made to a PAS, the GDUFA goal date associated with that PAS may be revised. FDA strongly recommends that, at the time of submission, a supplement should be complete and ready for a comprehensive review.

Submission of Supplements:
The following information should be provided on the first page of the PAS:

  • A statement indicating whether the PAS is for a new-strength product;
  • A statement indicating whether the submission is an amendment to a PAS, and if so the corresponding tier classification;
  • A statement indicating whether the PAS contains any manufacturing or facilities changes;
  • A list of the specific review disciplines to review the PAS (Chemistry, Labeling, DMF, Bioequivalence, Microbiology, or Clinical);
  • If expedited review is requested, the label Expedited Review Request should be placed prominently at the top of the submission. The submission should include a basis for the expedited review request.

It is possible to submit multiple PASs for the same chenge as “grouped supplements”. These are submitted to ANDAs by a single applicant for the same chemistry, manufacturing, and controls (CMC) change to each application. Because the grouped supplements are being reviewed together, generally they will have the same GDUFA goal date. Although the submissions are considered a group, each supplement in the group is considered its own individual submission and therefore would require a GDUFA PAS fee for each ANDA identified in the group.

Alternative Submissions:

  • Identify a lead ANDA for a group of PASs (only one fee is paid, or fewer than all the fees for the group are paid);
  • For some changes (e.g., widening of an approved specification or introduction of a new API supplier) once a PAS is submitted and approved, subsequent supplements for the same change to other ANDAs may be classified as CBE-30s;
  • comparability protocol submitted in a PAS to an ANDA for a specific drug product, once approved, may justify a reduced reporting category for the same change in subsequent supplements to that ANDA.

If FDA finds that a supplement submitted as a CBE supplement should have been submitted as a PAS, it will notify the applicant. The applicant is not required to withdraw the CBE supplement because when FDA sends a letter explaining that the applicant’s submission is not accepted as a CBE supplement, FDA administratively closes the CBE supplement, and it is considered withdrawn. The applicant may resubmit the supplement as a PAS for FDA approval before distribution of the drug product, along with the required GDUFA user fee. The GDUFA performance metric goals and applicable user fees will apply to that PAS and the GDUFA review clock will start from the date of submission of that PAS.

For more information please see the FDA Guidance for industry “ANDA Submissions – Prior Approval Supplements Under GDUFA“.

 

///////////Generics, FDA,  New Guidance,  Prior Approval Supplements

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Nov 242016
 

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CSIR, Dr. D. Srinivasa Reddy

WO2016181414, PROCESS FOR THE SYNTHESIS OF IVACAFTOR AND RELATED COMPOUNDS

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2016181414&recNum=1&maxRec=&office=&prevFilter=&sortOption=&queryString=&tab=PCTDescription

REDDY, Dumbala Srinivasa; (IN).
NATARAJAN, Vasudevan; (IN).
JACHAK, Gorakhnath Rajaram; (IN)

COUNCIL OF SCIENTIFIC & INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH [IN/IN]; Anusandhan Bhawan, Rafi Marg New Delhi 110001 (IN)

The present patent discloses a novel one pot two-step process for the synthesis of ivacaftor and related compounds of [Formula (I)], wherein R1, R2, R3, R4, R5, R6, R7 and Ar1are as described above; its tautomers or pharmaceutically acceptable salts thereof starting from indole acetic acid amides

See Eur J Org Chem, Nov 2015, for an article by the inventors, describing a process for preparing ivacaftor using 4-quinolone-3-carboxylic acid amides. The inventors appear to be based at National Chemical Laboratories of CSIR.

Ivacaftor, also known as N-(2,4-di-tert-butyl-5-hydroxyphenyl)-l,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline-3-carboxamide, having the following Formula (A):

Formula (A)

[003] Ivacaftor was approved by FDA and marketed by vertex pharma for the treatment of cystic fibrosis under the brand name KALYDECO® in the form of 150 mg oral tablets. Kalydeco® is indicated for the treatment of cystic fibrosis in patients age 6 years and older who have a G55ID mutation in the CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator)gene.

[004] U.S. 20100267768 discloses a process for preparation of ivacaftor, which involves the coupling of 4-oxo-l,4-dihydro-3- quinoline carboxylic acid with hydroxyl protected phenol intermediate in the presence of propyl phosphonic anhydride (T3P®) followed by deprotection of hydroxyl protection group and optional crystallization with isopropyl acetate. The publication also discloses the use of highly expensive coupling reagent, propyl phosphonic anhydride; which in turn results to an increase in the manufacturing cost. The process disclosed is schematically represented as follows:

[005] Article titled “Discovery of N-(2,4-Di-te -butyl-5-hydroxyphenyl)-4-oxo-l,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide (VX-770, Ivacaftor), a Potent and Orally Bioavailable CFTR Potentiator” byHadida,S et. al in . Med. Chem., 2014, 57 (23), pp 9776-9795 reportsN-(2,4-di-teri-butyl-5-hydroxyphenyl)-4-oxo- 1 ,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide (VX-770, 48, ivacaftor), an investigational drug candidate approved by the FDA for the treatment of CF patients 6 years of age and older carrying the G551D mutation.

[006] WO 2014125506 A2 discloses a process for the preparation of ivacaftor in high yield and purity by using novel protected quinolone carboxylic acid compounds as intermediates.

[007] Article titled “Expeditious synthesis of ivacaftor” by Jingshan Shen et. al in Heterocycles, 2014, 89 (4), pp 1035 – 1040 reports an expeditious synthesis for ivacaftor featuring modified Leimgruber-Batcho procedure. The overall yield is 39% over six steps from commercially available 2-nitrobenzoyl chloride.

[008] U.S.2011/064811 discloses a process for preparation of ivacaftor, which involves condensation of 4-oxo-l,4-dihydro-3- quinolone carboxylic acid with 5- amino-2,4-di-(tert-butyl)phenol in the presence of HBTU followed by the formation of ethanol crystalate, which is then treated with diethyl ether to yield ivacaftor as a solid.

[010] U.S. 7,495,103 discloses modulators of ATP-binding cassette transporters such as ivacaftor and a process for the preparation of modulators of ATP-binding cassette transporters such as quinolone compounds. The process includes condensation of 4-oxo-l,4-dihydro-3 -quinolone carboxylic acid with aniline in presence of 2-(lH-7-azabenzotriazol-l-yl)-l,l,3,3-tetramethyluronium hexafluoro phosphate methanaminium (HATU) as shown:

[011] U.S. 2011/230519 discloses a process for preparation of 4-oxo-l,4-dihydro-3-quinoline carboxylic acid by reaction of aniline with diethylethoxymethylenemalonate at 100-110°C followed by cyclization in phenyl ether at temperature 228-232°C and then hydrolysis, as shown below:

[012] US 7,402,674 B2 discloses 7-Phenylamino-4-quinolone-3-carboxylic acid derivatives, process for their preparation and their use as medicaments.

[013] US 4,981,854 discloses l-aryl-4-quinolone-3 carboxylic acids, processes for their preparation and anti-bacterial agents and feed additives containing these compounds.

Article titled “Ozonolysis Applications in Drug Synthesis” by Van Ornum,S.G. ; Champeau,R.M.; Pariza,R. in Chem. Rev., 2006, 106 (7), pp 2990-3001 reports that ozonolysis for the synthesis of numerous interesting bioactive natural products and pharmaceutical agents.

[014] Article titled “Safe Execution of a Large-Scale Ozonolysis: Preparation of the Bisulfite Adduct of 2-Hydroxyindan-2-carbox-aldehyde and Its Utility in a Reductive Animation” by RaganJ.A. et. al. in Org. Proc. Res. Dev., 2003, 7 (2), pp 155-160 reports various routes to bisulfite adduct, the most efficient of which involved vinyl Grignard addition to 2-indanone followed by ozonolysis and workup with aqueous NaHS03 to effect reduction and bisulfite formation in a single pot. The utility of bisulfite adduct is as an aldehyde surrogate in a reductive amination reaction.

[015] The reported methods for the synthesis of ivacaftor suffered from several drawbacks such as harsh conditions, high temperature reactions and use of large excess of polyphosphoric acid and corrosive phosphoryl chloride etc. Furthermore, synthesis of ivacaftor requires use of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) techniques for the separation of ivacaftor and their analogues.

[016] Therefore, development of a simple and efficient synthetic route is in urgent need. Accordingly the present inventors developed environmentally benign, cost effective and short synthetic route for the synthesis of ivacaftor and their analogues.

Example 1:

Procedur A:

To a solution of indole acetic acid (500 mg, 2.85 mmol), aniline (2.85 mmol), HOBt (3.4 mmol) in acetonitrile (10 mL), EDC.HCl (3.4 mmol) followed by DIPEA (11.4 mmol) was added, and mixture was stirred for 16 h at ambient temperature. The

reaction mixture was evaporated to dryness, diluted with EtOAc (25 mL), washed with saturated aqueous NaHC03 solution (5 mL), H20 (5 mL), brine (5 mL), and dried over Na2S04. The crude material obtained after removal of solvent was purified by column chromatography (silica gel 230-400 mesh, ethyl acetate – pet ether) to afford corresponding amide as a colorless solid.

[040] Example 2:

2-(lH-indol-3-yl)-N-phenylacetamide (1) :

Yield: 570 mg; 80%; 1H NMR (200MHz, DMSO-d6) δ = 10.95 (brs, 1 H), 10.14 (s, 1 H), 7.64 (d, J = 7.8 Hz, 3 H), 7.47 – 7.24 (m, 4 H), 7.21 – 6.92 (m, 3 H), 3.76 (s, 2H); MS: 273 (M+Na)+.

[041] Example 3:

5-(2-(lH-indol-3-yl)acetamido)-2,4-di-tert-butylphenyl methyl carbonate (2): Yield: 800 mg; 64%; 1H NMR (200 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ = 11.51 (brs, 1 H), 9.41 (s, 1 H), 8.12 (d, J = 7.6 Hz, 1 H), 7.96 – 7.78 (m, 3 H), 7.71 – 7.42 (m, 3 H), 4.34 (s, 3 H), 4.30 (s, 2 H), 1.79 (s, 9 H), 1.64 (s, 9 H); MS: 459 (M+Na)+.

[042] Example 4:

(S)-2-(lH-indol-3-yl)-N-(l-phenylethyl)acetamide (3):

Yield: 620 mg; 78%; 1H NMR (400MHz ,DMSO-d6)5 = 10.88 (brs, 1 H), 8.48 (d, J = 8.1 Hz, 1 H), 7.59 (d, J = 7.8 Hz, 1 H), 7.39 – 7.26 (m, 5 H), 7.25 – 7.16 (m, 2 H), 7.08 (t, J = 7.3 Hz, 1 H), 7.02 – 6.95 (m, 1 H), 4.96 (t, J = 7.3 Hz, 1 H), 3.59 (s, 2H), 1.38 (d, J = 7.1 Hz, 3 H).

[043] Example 5:

N-(4-Fluorophenyl)-2-(lH-indol-3-yl)acetamide (4):

1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) : δ 10.93 (brs, 1H), 10.17 (s, 1H), 7.68 – 7.61 (m, 3H), 7.36 (d, J= 8.1 Hz, 1H), 7.27 (d, J= 2.0 Hz, 1H), 7.15 – 7.13 (m, 3H), 7.11 – 6.99 (m, 1H), 3.73 (s, 2H); 13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-d6) : δ 170.1, 159.5, 157.1, 136.6, 136.3, 127.7, 124.4, 121.5, 121.3, 121.2, 119.1, 118.9, 115.8, 115.6, 111.8, 108.9, 34.2; MS: 269 (M+H)+

[044] Example 6:

N-(4-Chlorophenyl)-2-(lH-indol-3-yl)acetamide (5):

1H NMR (200 MHz, DMSO-d6): 510.93 (brs, 1H),10.24 (s, 1H), 7.67 – 7.59 (m, 3H), 7.36 – 7.27 (m, 4H), 7.12 – 6.98 (m, 2H), 3.74 (s, 2H); 13CNMR (100 MHz, DMSO-d6): 5170.4, 138.9, 136.7, 129.1, 127.8, 127.1, 124.5, 121.6, 121.2, 119.2, 119.0, 115.7, 111.9, 108.9, 34.3; MS: 285 (M+H)+.

[045] Example 7:

2-(lH-Indol-3-yl)-N-(p-tolyl)acetamide (6) :

1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): 510.91 (brs, 1H), 10.01 (s, 1H), 7.62 (d, J= 7.8 Hz, 1H), 7.50 (d, J= 8.6 Hz, 2H), 7.37 (d, J= 8.1 Hz, 1H), 7.29 – 7.26 (m, 1H), 7.10 – 7.07 (m, 3H), 7.01 – 6.99 (m, 1H), 3.71 (s, 2H), 2.23 (s, 3H); 13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-de): 5170.0, 137.4, 136.6, 132.4, 129.5, 127.7, 124.3, 121.4, 119.6, 119.2, 118.8, 111.8, 109.1, 34.2, 20.9; MS: 265 (M+H)+.

[046] Example 8:

N-(4-Ethylphenyl)-2-(lH-indol-3-yl)acetamide (7):

XH NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): 510.91 (brs, 1H), 10.01 (s, 1H), 7.61 (s, 1H), 7.52 (d, J= 8.3 Hz, 2H), 7.36 (d, J= 8.1 Hz, 1H), 7.26 (s, 1H), 7.15 – 7.04 (m, 3H), 6.99 (s, 1H), 2.55 (t, J= 7.5 Hz, 2H), 1.15 (t, J= 7.5 Hz, 3H); 13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-d6): 5169.9, 138.9, 137.6, 136.6, 128.3, 127.7, 124.3, 121.4, 119.6, 119.2, 118.8, 111.8, 109.1, 40.6, 40.4, 40.2, 40.0, 39.8, 39.6, 39.4, 34.2, 28.0, 16.2; MS: 279 (M+H)+.

[047] Example 9:

2-(lH-Indol-3-yl)-N-(4-propylphenyl)acetamide (8):

1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): 58.48 (brs, 1H), 7.64 (d, J = 8.1 Hz, 1H), 7.50 – 7.42 (m, 2H), 7.33 – 7.15 (m, 6H), 7.07 (d, J= 8.3 Hz, 2H), 3.92 (s, 2H), 2.52 (t, J= 7.6 Hz, 2H), 1.65 – 1.53 (m, 2H), 0.91 (t, J= 7.3 Hz, 3H); 13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-d6): 5169.7, 138.9, 136.5, 135.2, 128.8, 126.9, 124.0, 122.8, 120.4, 120.1, 118.7, 111.6, 108.7, 37.4, 34.5, 24.6, 13.7; MS: 315 (M+Na)+.

[048] Example 10:

2-(lH-Indol-3-yl)-N-(4-isopropylphenyl)acetamide (9) :

yield 79% ; 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 10.91 (brs, 1H), 10.01 (s, 1H), 7.62 (d, = 7.8 Hz, 1H), 7.55 – 7.49 (m, = 8.6 Hz, 2H), 7.37 (d, = 8.1 Hz, 1H), 7.26 (d, = 2.0 Hz, 1H), 7.18 – 7.11 (m, = 8.6 Hz, 2H), 7.11 – 7.05 (m, 1H), 7.02 – 6.95 (m, 1H), 2.95 – 2.71 (m, 1H), 1.17 (d, = 6.8 Hz, 6H); 13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 169.9, 143.5, 137.6, 136.6, 127.7, 126.8, 124.3, 121.4, 119.7, 119.2, 118.8, 111.8, 109.2, 24.4; MS: 315 (M+Na)+.

[049] Example 11:

2-(lH-indol-3-yl)-N-(4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenyl)acetamide (10):

Yield 85% ; 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDC13): δ 8.35 (brs., 1 H), 7.44 – 7.38 (m, 2 H), 7.27 – 7.21 (m, 3 H), 7.12 – 7.05 (m, 1H), 7.03 – 6.95 (m, 2H), 6.93 (d, = 8.6 Hz, 2H), 3.75 (s, 2H); 13C NMR (100 MHz, CDC13): δ 170.0, 145.3, 136.5, 136.2, 126.8, 124.1, 123.0, 121.6, 121.2, 120.5, 118.5, 111.7, 108.2, 34.4; MS: 335 (M+Na)+.

[050] Example 12:

N-(2-chloro-5-methoxyphenyl)-2-(lH-indol-3-yl)acetamide (11):

Yield 75% ; XH NMR (200 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 10.98 (brs, 1H), 9.27 (s, 1H), 7.59 (d, = 7.8 Hz, 1H), 7.53 (d, = 2.9 Hz, 1H), 7.39 – 7.32 (m, 3H), 7.09 – 6.99 (m, 2H), 6.74 (dd, = 3.0, 8.8 Hz, 1H), 3.85 (s, 2H), 3.71 (s, 3H); 13C NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 170.4, 160.1, 141.1, 136.7, 130.0, 127.8, 124.4, 121.6, 119.2, 119.0, 111.9, 109.1, 105.4, 55.4, 34.4; MS: 315 (M+Na)+.

[051]Example 13:

N-(2-ethylphenyl)-2-(lH-indol-3-yl)acetamide (12):

Yield 78% ; 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDC13): δ 8.68 (brs, 1H), 7.95 (d, = 8.1 Hz, 1H), 7.67 (d, = 7.8 Hz, 1H), 7.48 – 7.44 (m, 2H), 7.29 – 7.23 (m, 1H), 7.22 – 7.20 (m, 3H), 7.05 (d, = 4.4 Hz, 2H), 2.00 (q, = 7.4 Hz, 2H), 0.67 (t, = 7.6 Hz, 3H); 13C NMR (100 MHz, CDC13): δ 169.9, 136.6, 135.0, 134.3, 128.7, 126.7, 125.1, 124.1, 123.0, 122.5, 120.4, 118.7, 111.6, 108.6, 34.4, 24.2, 13.6.

[052] Example 14:

N-(2-bromophenyl)-2-(lH-indol-3-yl)acetamide(13):

Yield 76%; 1H NMR (200 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 11.00 (brs, 1H), 9.30 (s, 1H), 7.81 -7.77 (m, 1H), 7.63 – 7.56 (m, 2H), 7.41 – 7.35 (m, 3H), 7.11 – 7.05 (m, 3H), 3.85 (s, 2H);13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 169.9, 136.2, 132.5, 128.0, 127.2, 126.4, 125.5, 124.4, 121.2, 118.7, 118.5, 116.4, 111.4, 108.0, 33.2.

[053] Example 15:

N-benzyl-2-(lH-indol-3-yl)acetamide (14):

Yield 85%; 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 10.89 (brs., 1H), 8.40 (t, = 5.7 Hz, 1H), 7.57 (d, = 7.8 Hz, 1H), 7.36 (d, = 8.1 Hz, 1H), 7.32 – 7.18 (m, 6H), 7.08 (t, = 7.5Hz, 1H), 7.03 – 6.90 (m, 1H), 4.28 (d, = 5.9Hz, 2H), 3.60 (s, 2H); 13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-de): δ 171.2, 140.1, 136.6, 128.7, 127.7, 127.2, 124.3, 121.4, 119.2, 118.7, 111.8, 109.3, 42.7, 33.2.

[054] Example 16:

2-(lH-indol-3-yl)-N-(4-methoxybenzyl)acetamide(15):

Yield 85% ; 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 10.87 (brs, 1 H), 8.32 (t, = 5.6 Hz, 1 H), 7.55 (d, = 7.8 Hz, 1H), 7.35 (d, = 8.1 Hz, 1H), 7.22 – 7.13 (m, 3H), 7.11 – 7.05 (m, 1 H), 7.00 – 6.94 (m, 1H), 6.84 (d, = 8.6 Hz, 2H), 4.20 (d, = 6.1 Hz, 2H), 3.72 (s, 3H), 3.56 (s, 2H); 13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 171.1, 158.6, 136.6, 132.0, 129.0, 127.7, 124.2, 121.4, 119.2, 118.7, 114.1, 111.8, 109.4, 55.5, 42.1, 33.2.

[055] Example 17:

N,N-dibenzyl-2-(lH-indol-3-yl)acetamide (16):

Yield 70% ; 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 10.91 (brs, 1H), 7.50 (d, = 7.8 Hz, 1H), 7.37 – 7.34 (m, 3H), 7.30 (d, = 6.6 Hz, 1H), 7.25 – 7.19 (m, 3H), 7.17 (t, = 6.6 Hz, 5H), 7.16 (d, = 7.8 Hz, 1H), 7.00 – 6.97 (m, 1H), 4.59 (s, 2H), 4.50 (s, 2H), 3.86 (s, 2H); 13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 171.7, 138.2, 136.6, 129.2, 128.8, 128.1, 127.8, 127.7, 127.5, 127.1, 124.2, 121.5, 119.2, 118.8, 111.8, 108.5, 50.7, 48.4, 31.2.

[056] Example 18:

2-(lH-indol-3-yl)-N-propylacetamide (17):

Yield 75% ; XH NMR (200 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 10.86 (brs, 1H), 7.88 – 7.80 (m, 1H), 7.56 (d, = 7.6 Hz, 1H), 7.31 (d, = 7.8 Hz, 1H), 7.17 (d, = 2.3 Hz, 1H), 7.06 – 6.92 (m, 2H), 3.48 (s, 2H), 3.00 (q, J = 6.8 Hz, 2H), 1.39 (sxt, / = 7.2 Hz, 2H), 0.88 – 0.75 (t, = 7.2 Hz, 3H); 13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 171.0, 136.6, 127.8, 124.2,

121.4, 119.2, 118.7, 111.8, 109.6, 39.4, 33.3, 22.9, 11.9.

[057] Example 19:

N-hexyl-2-(lH-indol-3-yl)acetamide (18) :

Yield 87% ; 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 10.84 (brs, 1H), 7.83 (brs, 1H), 7.54 (d, = 7.8 Hz, 1H), 7.33 (d, = 8.1 Hz, 1H), 7.21 – 7.13 (m, 1H), 7.06 (t, = 7.6 Hz, 1H), 6.96 (t, J = 7.5 Hz, 1H), 3.47 (s, 2H), 3.03 (q, / = 6.8 Hz, 2H), 1.37 (t, = 6.5 Hz, 2H), 1.30 – 1.15 (m, 6H), 0.84 (t, = 6.7 Hz, 3H); 13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 170.9, 136.6, 127.7, 124.2, 121.3, 119.1, 118.7, 111.7, 109.5, 39.06, 33.2, 31.5, 29.6, 26.5, 22.5, 14.4.

[058] Example 20:

Methyl (2-(lH-indol-3-yl)acetyl)-L-alaninate (19):

Yield 79% ; 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDC13): δ 8.53 (brs, 1H), 7.60 (d, = 7.8 Hz, 1H), 7.41 (d, = 8.1 Hz, 1H), 7.25 – 7.23 (m, 1H), 7.19 – 7.14 (m, 2H), 6.27 (d, = 7.3 Hz, 1H), 4.63 (t, = 7.3 Hz, 1H), 3.78 (s, 2H), 3.68 (s, 3H), 1.31 (d, = 7.3 Hz, 3H); 13C NMR (100 MHz, CDC13): δ 173.4, 171.2, 136.4, 127.0, 123.8, 122.5, 119.9, 118.7,

111.5, 108.5, 52.4, 48.0, 33.3, 18.2.

[059] Example 21:

-(6-chloro-lH-indol-3-yl)-N-phenylacetamide(20):

To a solution of 6-Chloro indole 20a (300 mg, 1.98 mmol )in anhydrous THF, Oxalyl chloride (186 μΤ, 276 mg, 2.18 mmol) was added and the mixture stirred at room temperature. After 2 h, N,N-Diisopropylethylamine (758 μΤ, 562 mg, 4.35 mmol) was

introduced to the mixture, followed by the aniline (221.0 mg, 2.37 mmol). The temperature was raised to 45 °C, and heating continued for 18 h. The solvent was evaporated, and then mixture was diluted with EtOAC (15 mL), washed with brine and dried over anhydrous Na2S04. The crude material obtained after removal of solvent was purified by column chromatography (10 – 20% EtOAc : Petroleum ether) to afford 20b (295 mg, 51% yield) as a yellow coloured solid. IR Omax(film): 3346, 3307,2853, 1724, 1678 cm“1; 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 12.40 (br. s., 1H), 10.68 (s, 1H), 8.79 (d, = 3.2 Hz, 1H), 8.25 (d, = 8.6 Hz, 1H), 7.85 (d, = 7.8 Hz, 2H), 7.62 (d, = 1.7 Hz, 1H), 7.41 – 7.30 (m, 3H), 7.19 – 7.13 (m, 1H); 13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 182.5, 162.5, 140.0, 138.4, 137.4, 129.2, 128.5, 125.4, 124.8, 123.4, 122.9, 120.8, 113.0, 112.3; HRMS (ESI) Calculated for Ci6HnN2OCl[M+H]+: 299.0582, found 299.0580;

A solution of 20b (300 mg, 0.99 mmol) dissolved in MeOH (40 mL) was added to NaBH4 (45 mg, 1.23 mmol). The reaction was stirred for 4h and then added to saturated solution of Na2S04. The reaction mixture was further stirred for lh and then filtered through Celite.The filtrate obtained was concentrated in vacuo, and then mixture was diluted with EtOAc (15 mL), washed with brine and dried over anhydrous Na2S04. The crude material obtained after removal of solvent was forwarded for next step without further purification.In an N2 atmosphere, TMSC1 (1.272 mL, 9.9 mmol) in CH3CN (40 mL) was added to sodium iodide (1.488 mg, 9.9 mmol) and stirred for 2h. The reaction mixture was cooled to 0 °C and a solution of above crude alcohol (0.99 mmol) in CH3CN (10 mL) was then added drop wise over 30 min, followed by stirring for 3h. The reaction mixture was poured into NaOH (7g in 40 mL of water) and then extracted with ethyl acetate (15×2). The organic layer was washed with aq.Na2S203, dried over Na2S04 and concentrated in vacuo. The residue was chromatographed on silica gel (EtOAc:Pet ether) to afford 20 as a off white solid (two steps 38 % ); IR Umax(film): 3273, 3084,2953, 2857, 1629, 1562 cm“1; 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 11.06 (br. s., 1H), 10.13 (br. s., 1H), 7.62 – 7.57 (m, 3H), 7.40 (s, 1H), 7.30 – 7.25 (m, 3H), 7.04 – 6.99 (m, 2H), 3.71 (s, 2H); 13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 170.1,

139.7, 136.9, 129.2, 126.5, 126.3, 125.5, 123.7, 120.6, 119.6, 119.3, 111.5, 109.4, 34.0; HRMS (ESI):Calculated for Ci6Hi4N2OCl[M+H]+: 285.0789, found 285.0786.

[060] Example 22:

2-(5-chloro-lH-indol-3-yl)-N-phenylacetamide(21):

21a 21b 21

To a solution of 5-Chloro indole 21a (300 mg, 1.98 mmol )in anhydrous THF(20 mL), Oxalyl chloride (186 ^L, 276 mg, 2.18 mmol) was added and the mixture stirred at room temperature. After 2 h, N,N-diisopropylethylamine (758 μΕ, 562 mg, 4.35 mmol) was introduced to the mixture, followed by the aniline (221.0 mg, 2.37 mmol). The tempera ture was raised to 45 °C, and heating continued for 18 h. The solvent was evaporated, and then mixture was diluted with EtOAC (15 mL), washed with brine and dried over anhydrous Na2S04. The crude material obtained after removal of solvent was purified by column chromatography (10 – 20% EtOAc : Petroleum ether) to afford (21b) (305 mg, 53% yield) as a yellow coloured solid. IR rjmax(film): 3346, 3307,2853, 1724, 1678 cm“1; 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 12.40 (br. s., 1H), 10.68 (s, 1H), 8.79 (d, = 3.2 Hz, 1H), 8.25 (d, = 8.6 Hz, 1H), 7.85 (d, = 7.8 Hz, 2H), 7.62 (d, = 1.7 Hz, 1H), 7.42 – 7.30 (m, 3H), 7.20 – 7.14 (m, 1H); 13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 182.4, 162.4, 140.3, 138.4, 135.4, 129.2, 127.9, 124.8, 124.1, 120.8, 114.8, 112.0; HRMS (ESI) Calculated for Ci6HnN2OCl[M+H]+: 299.0582, found 299.0580; A solution of 21b (200 mg, 0.66 mmol) dissolved in MeOH (30 mL) was added to NaBH4 (30 mg, 0.82 mmol). The reaction was stirred for 4h and then added to saturated solution of Na2S04. The reaction mixture was further stirred for lh and then filtered through Celite. The filtrate obtained was concentrated in vacuo, and then mixture was diluted with EtOAc (15 mL), washed with brine and dried over anhydrous Na2S04. The crude material obtained after removal of solvent was forwarded for next step without further purification. In an N2 atmosphere, TMSC1 (848 mL, 6.6 mmol) in CH3CN (25 mL) was added to sodium iodide (992 mg, 6.6 mmol) and stirred for 2h. The reaction mixture was cooled to 0 °C and a solution of above crude alcohol(0.66 mmol) in CH3CN (5 mL) was then added dropwise over 30 min, followed by stirring for 3h. The reaction mixture was poured into NaOH (5g in 30 mL of water) and then extracted with ethyl acetate(15×2). The organic layer was washed with aq.Na2S203, dried over Na2S04 and concentrated in vacuo. The residue was chromatographed on silica gel (EtOAc:Pet ether) to afford 22 as a off white solid (two steps 42 % ); IR Umax(film): 3273, 3084,2955, 2857, 1629, 1562 cm“1; 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 11.13 (br. s., 1H), 10.11 (s, 1H), 7.67 (s, 1H), 7.60 (d, = 7.8 Hz, 2H), 7.39 – 7.27 (m, 4H), 7.13 – 7.02 (m, 2H), 3.16 (s, 2H); 13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 169.9, 139.8, 135.0, 129.2, 128.9, 126.2, 123.6, 121.4, 119.6, 118.6, 113.4, 109.0, 34.0; HRMS (ESI) Calculated for Ci6H14N2OCl[M+H]+: 285.0789, found 285.0786.

[061] Example 23:

2-(l-benzyl-lH-indol-3-yl)-N-phenylacetamide (22):

Yield 79% ; 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 7.67 (d, = 7.8 Hz, 1H), 7.54 (brs, 1H), 7.43 – 7.31 (m, 6H), 7.31 – 7.25 (m, 3H), 7.23 – 7.15 (m, 4H), 7.12 – 7.06 (m, 1H), 5.36 (s, 2H), 3.91 (s, 2H); 13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 169.7, 137.7, 137.2, 137.0, 128.9, 128.9, 127.9, 127.6, 126.9, 124.3, 122.7, 120.2, 119.9, 119.0, 110.2, 107.9, 77.4, 77.1, 76.8, 50.1, 34.5.

[062] Example 24:

Procedure B:

2-(lH-indol-3-yl)-N-phenylacetamidel(100 mg; 0.4 mmol) was dissolved in DCM:MeOH(50 mL; 5: 1), then a stream of 03 was passed through the solution until a blue color developed (10 min). The 03 stream was continued for 4 min. Then surplus O3 was removed by passing a stream of 02 through the solution for 10 min or until the blue colorcompletely vanished. Afterwards pyridine (0.1 mL;1.2mmol) was added to the cold (- 78 °C) mixture. The mixture was allowed to warm to room temperature (1 h) and then Et3N (0.35 mL; 2.4 mmol) were added. After stirring at room temperature overnight the reaction mass was concentrated under reduced pressure to dryness, diluted with EtOAc (30 mL), washed with H20 (5 mL), brine (5 mL), and dried over Na2S04. The crude material obtained after removal of solvent was purified by column chromatography (silica gel 230-400 mesh, MeOH – DCM) to give desired quinolone carboxamide as colorless solid.

[063] Example 25:

4-oxo-N-phenyl-l,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide (23):

Yield: 65 mg; 62%; XH NMR (200MHz ,DMSO-d6) δ = 12.97 (brs, 1 H), 12.49 (s, 1 H), 8.89 (s, 1 H), 8.33 (d, J = 8.2 Hz, 1 H), 7.91 – 7.69 (m, 4 H), 7.62 – 7.50 (m, 1 H), 7.37 (t, J = 7.8 Hz, 2 H), 7.18 – 7.01 (m, 1 H); MS: 287 (M+Na)+.

[064] Example 26:

2,4-di-tert-butyl-5-(4-oxo-l,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamido)phenyl methyl carbonate (24):

Yield: 35 mg; 34%; 1H NMR (400MHz ,DMSO-d6) δ = 12.96 (brs, 1 H), 12.08 (s, 1 H), 8.94 – 8.82 (m, 1 H), 8.44 – 8.28 (m, 1 H), 7.86 – 7.79 (m, 1 H), 7.78 – 7.73 (m, 1 H), 7.59 (s, 1 H), 7.53 (t, J = 7.5 Hz, 1 H), 7.39 (s, 1 H), 3.86 (s, 3 H), 1.46 (s, 9 H), 1.32 (s, 9 H).

[065] Example 27:

(S)-4-oxo-N-(l-phenylethyl)-l,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide (25):

Yield: 56 mg; 53%; 1H NMR (500MHz ,DMSO-d6) δ = 12.75 (brs, 1H), 10.54 (d, J = 7.6 Hz, 1H), 8.73 (brs, 1H), 8.28 (d, J = 7.9 Hz, 1H), 7.78 (d, J = 7.9 Hz, 1H), 7.73 -7.68 (m, 1 H), 7.50 (t, J = 7.5 Hz, 1 H), 7.42 – 7.34 (m, 4 H), 7.29 – 7.23 (m, 1 H), 5.18 (t, J = 7.2 Hz, 1 H), 1.50 (d, J = 6.7 Hz, 3 H).

[066] Example 28:

Synthesis of ivacaftor (26):

To a solution of 2,4-di-tert-butyl-5-(4-oxo-l,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamido)phenyl methyl carbonate 5 (30 mg, 0.06mmol) in MeOH (2 mL) was added NaOH (5.3 mg, 0.13mmol) dissolved in H20 (2 mL), and the reaction mixture was stirred at room temperature for 5h. Reaction mass was evaporated to one third of its volume (temperature not exceeding 40°C) and acidified with aq.2N HC1 to pH 2-3. The resulting precipitate was collected by suction filtration give desired compound 7 (19 mg, 76%) as off white solid H NMR (400MHz ,DMSO-d6) δ = 12.88 (d, J = 6.6 Hz, 1 H), 11.81 (s, 1 H), 9.20 (s, 1 H), 8.86 (d, J = 6.6 Hz, 1 H), 8.32 (d, J = 7.8 Hz, 1 H), 7.88 – 7.65 (m, 2 H), 7.51 (t, J = 7.5 Hz, 1 H), 7.16 (s, 1 H), 7.10 (s, 1 H), 1.38 (s,9H), 1.36 (s, 9H).

[067] Example 29:

N-(4-fluorophenyl)-4-oxo-l,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide (27):

Yield 56% ; 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 12.96 (br. s., 1H), 12.50 (s, 1H), 8.88 (s, 1H), 8.33 (d, = 7.3 Hz, 1H), 7.86 – 7.72 (m, 4H), 7.54 (t, = 7.3 Hz, 1H), 7.20 (t, = 8.8 Hz, 2H); 13C NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 176.8, 163.2, 159.7, 157.3, 144.6, 139.6, 135.7, 133.5, 126.4, 125.9, 125.8, 121.8, 119.7, 116.1, 115.9, 110.9.

[068] Example 30:

N-(4-chlorophenyl)-4-oxo-l,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide (28):

Yield 51% ; 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 13.00 (brs., 1H), 12.59 (br. s., 1H), 8.89 (s, 1H), 8.34 (d, = 7.6 Hz, 1H), 7.83 – 7.76 (m, 4H), 7.56 (s, 1H), 7.42 (d, = 7.9 Hz, 2H); 13C NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 176.8, 163.4, 144.7, 139.6, 138.2, 133.5, 129.4, 127.4, 126.4, 125.9, 125.8, 121.6, 119.7, 110.8.

[069] Example 31:

4-oxo-N-(p-tolyl)-l,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide (29):

Yield 57% ; 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 12.94 (brs., 1H), 12.40 (s, 1H), 8.88 (s, 1H), 8.33 (d, = 7.8Hz, 1H), 7.82 – 7.80 (m, 1H), 7.76 – 7.7 (m, 1H), 7.63 (d, = 8.3 Hz, 2H), 7.53 (t, = 7.3 Hz, 1H), 7.17 (d, = 8.1 Hz, 2H), 2.29 (s, 3H); 13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-de): δ 176.8, 163.1, 144.5, 139.6, 136.8, 133.4, 132.8, 129.9, 126.4, 125.9, 125.7, 120.0, 119.6, 111.1, 20.9; HRMS (ESI):Calculated for Ci7H1502N2[M+H]+: 279.1128, found 279.1127.

[070] Example 32:

N-(4-ethylphenyl)-4-oxo-l,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide (30):

Yield 51% ; 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 12.95 (br. s., 1H), 12.40 (d, = 7.8 Hz, 1H), 8.87 (d, = 6.1 Hz, 1H), 8.33 (d, = 8.1 Hz, 1H), 7.81 – 7.76 (m, 2H), 7.66 – 7.62 (m, = 8.3 Hz, 2H), 7.53 (t, 7 = 7.5 Hz, 1H), 7.22 – 7.17 (m, = 8.3 Hz, 2H), 2.58 (q, = 7.6 Hz, 2H), 1.18 (t, = 7.6 Hz, 3H); 13C NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 181.5, 167.8, 149.3, 144.3, 144.0, 141.7, 138.2, 133.4, 131.1, 130.7, 130.5, 124.8, 124.4, 115.9, 32.8, 20.9.

[071] Example 33:

4-Oxo-N-(4-propylphenyl)-l,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide (31):

Yield 51%; 1H NMR (500 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ12.93 (brs, 1H), 12.40 (s, 1H), 8.87 (s, 1H), 8.36 – 8.29 (m, 1H), 7.86 – 7.78 (m, 1H), 7.75 (d, J= 7.9 Hz, 1H), 7.68 – 7.61 (m, J= 8.2 Hz, 2H), 7.54 (t, J= 7.6 Hz, 1H), 7.22 – 7.14 (m, J= 8.2 Hz, 2H), 2.55 – 2.51 (m, 2H), 1.64 – 1.53 (m, 2H), 0.90 (t, J= 7.3 Hz, 3H); 13C NMR (500 MHz, DMSO-d6): 176.8, 163.1, 144.5, 139.6, 137.6, 137.0, 133.5, 129.3, 126.4, 125.9, 125.7, 120.0, 119.7, 111.1, 37.2, 24.6, 14.1.

[072] Example 34:

N-(4-isopropylphenyl)-4-oxo-l,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide (32):

Yield 46% ; 1H NMR (500 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 12.93 (br. s., 1H), 12.40 (br. s., 1H), 8.89 – 8.86 (m, 1H), 8.33(d, = 7.6 Hz, 1H), 7.81 – 7.50 (m, 5H), 7.25 – 7.21 (m, 2H), 2.90-2.83 (m, 1H), 1.22-1. l l(m, 6H); 13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 176.8, 163.1, 144.5, 143.9, 139.6, 137.1, 133.4, 127.2, 126.4, 125.9, 125.7, 120.1, 119.6, 111.1, 33.4, 24.4.

[073] Example 35:

4-oxo-N-(4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenyl)-l,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide(33):

Yield 57% ; 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 12.98 (br. s., 1H), 12.63 (s, 1H), 8.88 (d, = 4.9 Hz, 1H), 8.32 (d, = 7.8 Hz, 1H), 7.89 – 7.83 (m, = 8.8 Hz, 2H), 7.79 (d, = 7.6 Hz, 1H), 7.77 – 7.73 (m, 1H), 7.53 (t, J = 7.5 Hz, 1H), 7.40 – 7.34 (m, = 8.6 Hz, 2H); 13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 176.8, 163.5, 144.7, 144.0, 139.5, 138.5, 133.5, 126.3, 125.9, 125.8, 122.3, 121.4, 119.7, 110.7.

[074] Example 36:

N-(2-chloro-5-methoxyphenyl)-4-oxo-l,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide(34):

Yield 54% ; XH NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 12.98 (br. s., 1H), 12.49 (s, 1H), 8.88 (s, 1H), 8.33 (d, = 7.8 Hz, 1H), 7.83 – 7.75 (m, 1H), 7.56-7.48 (m, 3H), 7.27 – 7.21 (m, 1H), 6.67 (d, = 7.8 Hz, 1H), 3.77 (s, 3H); 13C NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 176.8, 163.4, 160.2, 144.7, 140.4, 139.6, 133.5, 130.3, 126.4, 125.9, 125.8, 119.7, 112.3, 111.0, 109.5, 105.7, 55.5.

[075] Example 37:

N-(2-ethylphenyl)-4-oxo-l,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide(35):

Yield 58% ; 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 12.94 (br. s., 1H), 12.37 (s, 1H), 8.90 (s, 1H), 8.36 (dd, = 8.1, 1.4 Hz, 2H), 8.32 (dd, = 8.1, 1.4 Hz, 2H), 7.82 – 7.74 (m, 1H), 7.53- 7.19 (m, 3H), 7.15 – 7.06(m, 1H), 2.79 (q, = 7.3 Hz, 2H), 1.26 (t, = 7.5 Hz, 3H); 293 (M+H)+.

[076] Example 38:

N-(2-bromophenyl)-4-oxo-l,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide(36):

Yield 47% ; 1H NMR (200 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 12.98 (br. s., 1H), 12.69 (s, 1H), 8.90 (d, = 5.9 Hz, 1H), 8.54 (dd, 7 = 1.4, 8.3 Hz, 1H), 8.34 (d, = 7.6 Hz, 1H), 7.86 – 7.67 (m, 3H), 7.57 – 7.49 (m, 1H), 7.40 (t, = 7.2 Hz, 1H), 7.10 – 7.05 (m, 1H); 13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-de): δ 176.7, 163.7, 145.0, 139.5, 137.7, 133.5, 133.1, 128.6, 126.4, 126.0, 125.8, 125.3, 122.9, 119.7, 113.4, 110.8.

[077] Example 39:

N-benzyl-4-oxo-l,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide(37):

Yield 58% ; 1H NMR (400 MHz, CD3OD-d6): δ 8.82 (s, 1 H), 8.35 (d, = 8.1 Hz, 1 H), 7.79 – 7.77 (m, 1 H), 7.65 (d, = 8.3 Hz, 1 H), 7.52 (t, = 7.6 Hz, 1 H), 7.42 – 7.34 (m, 4 H), 7.31 – 7.26 (m, 1 H), 4.67 (s, 2 H); 13C NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 176.6, 165.0, 144.2, 140.0, 139.5, 133.2, 128.9, 128.7, 127.8, 127.3, 126.6, 125.9, 125.4, 119.5, 111.2, 42.6.

[078] ] Example 40:

N-(4-methoxybenzyl)-4-oxo-l,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide(38):

Yield 56% ; 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 12.73 (br. s., 1H), 10.35 (t, = 5.3 Hz, 1H), 8.78 (d, = 6.1 Hz, 1H), 8.24 (d, = 8.1 Hz, 1H), 7.76 (d, = 7.1 Hz, 1H), 7.73 -7.68 (m, 1H), 7.48 (t, = 7.5 Hz, 1H), 7.28 (d, = 8.3 Hz, 2H), 6.91 (d, = 8.1 Hz, 2H), 4.49 (d, = 5.6 Hz, 2H), 3.74 (s, 3H); 13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 176.6, 164.8, 158.8, 144.1, 139.5, 133.1, 131.9, 129.2, 126.6, 125.8, 125.4, 119.5, 114.3, 111.3, 55.5, 42.0.

[079] Example 41:

N,N-dibenzyl-4-oxo-l,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide(39):

Yield 43% ; 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 12.21 (br. s., 1H), 8.27 (d, = 4.9 Hz, 1H), 8.21 (d, = 7.6 Hz, 1H), 7.49 – 7.41 (m, 2H), 7.41 – 7.35 (m, 3H), 7.33 – 7.20 (m, 5H), 7.20 – 7.11 (m, 7 = 7.1 Hz, 2H), 4.59 (br. s., 2H), 4.42 (s, 2H).

[080] Example 42:

4-oxo-N-propyl-l,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide(40):

Yield 47% ;1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 12.7 (br.s., 1H)10.05 (t, = 5.5 Hz, 1H), 8.74 (s, 1H), 8.26 (d, = 8.1 Hz, 1H), 7.83 – 7.66 (m, 2H), 7.52 – 7.44 (m, 1H), 3.33 – 3.22 (m, 2H), 1.61 – 1.49 (m, 2H), 0.93 (t, = 7.5 Hz, 3H); 13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-de): δ 176.6, 164.8, 143.9, 139.5, 133.1, 126.6, 125.9, 125.3, 119.4, 111.4, 39.3, 23.1, 12.0

[081] Example 43:

N-hexyl-4-oxo-l,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide(41):

Yield 51% ;1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 12.68 (m, 1H), 10.02 (t, = 5.5 Hz, 1H), 8.73 (d, = 6.1 Hz, 1H), 8.27 – 8.25 (m, 1H), 7.77 – 7.67 (m, 2H), 7.47 (t, = 7.5 Hz, 1H), 3.33 – 3.29 (m, 2H), 1.56 – 1.45 (m, 2H), 1.34 – 1.25 (m, 6H), 0.88 – 0.82 (m, 3H); 13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 176.6, 164.8, 143.9, 139.5, 133.1, 126.6, 125.9, 125.3, 119.4, 111.4, 38.7, 31.5, 29.8, 26.7, 22.5, 14.4.

[082] Example 44:

Methyl (4-oxo-l,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carbonyl)-L-alaninate(42):

Yield 38% ; 1H NMR (400 MHz, CD3OD): δ 8.74 (s, 1H), 8.47 – 8.29 (m, 1H), 7.86 -7.76 (m, 1H), 7.64 (d, = 8.3 Hz, 1H), 7.58 – 7.44 (m, 1H), 4.69 (d, = 7.3 Hz, 1H), 3.79 (s, 3H), 1.55 (d, = 7.3 Hz, 3H); 13C NMR (100 MHz, CD3OD): δ 177.3, 173.3, 165.5, 143.6, 139.2, 132.9, 126.3, 125.4, 125.2, 118.5, 110.3, 51.5, 47.0, 17.0.

[083] Example 45:

7-chloro-4-oxo-N-phenyl-l,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide(43):

Yield 48% ; IR Omax(film): 2920, 2868, 1661, 1601 cm” 1; 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-de): δ 12.91 (br. s., 1H), 12.30 (s, 1H), 8.90 (s, 1H), 8.29 (d, = 8.8 Hz, 1H), 7.80 -7.67 (m, 3H), 7.58 – 7.51 (m, 1H), 7.36 (t, = 7.7 Hz, 2H), 7.09 (t, = 7.3 Hz, 1H); 13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 176.3, 162.9, 145.4, 140.3, 139.2, 138.0, 129.5, 128.2, 126.1, 125.1, 123.9, 120.1, 118.8, 111.6.

[084] Example 46:

6-chloro-4-oxo-N-phenyl-l,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide(44):

Yield 52% ; 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 13.05 (brs, 1H), 12.27 (s, 1H), 8.88 (s, 1H), 8.21 (d, = 2.2 Hz, 1H), 7.86 – 7.67 (m, 4H), 7.36 (t, = 7.8 Hz, 2H), 7.16 – 7.04 (m, 1H); 13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 175.6, 162.9, 144.9, 139.1, 138.2, 133.5, 130.4, 129.5, 127.5, 124.9, 123.9, 122.0, 120.1, 111.4.

[085] Example 47:

l-benzyl-4-oxo-N-phenyl-l,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide(45)

Yield 55% ; 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 12.30 (s, 1H), 9.05 (s, 1H), 8.60 (dd, = 1.7, 8.1 Hz, 1H), 7.82 (d, = 7.8 Hz, 2H), 7.69 – 7.62 (m, 1H), 7.55 – 7.45 (m, 2H), 7.43 – 7.34 (m, 5H), 7.24 – 7.18 (m, 2H), 7.17 – 7.10 (m, 1H), 5.53 (s, 2H); 13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 176.9, 162.9, 148.7, 139.3, 138.7, 134.1, 133.1, 129.4, 128.9, 128.7, 128.0, 127.4, 126.2, 125.5, 123.9, 120.5, 116.9, 112.3, 57.9; HRMS (ESI): Calculated for C23H1802N2Na [M+Na]+: 377.1260, found 377.1259; MS: 355 (M+H)+.

[086] Advantages of invention:

1. Cost-effective process for synthesis.

2. Carried out at environmentally benign conditions.

3. Short synthetic route.

4. Useful for making several related compounds of medicinal

 

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DR SRINIVASA REDDY recieving NASI – Reliance Industries Platinum Jubilee Award (2015) for Application Oriented Innovations in Physical Sciences.

 

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MYSELF WITH HIM

 

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From left to right: Dr. D. Srinivasa Reddy, Shri Y. S. Chowdary, Dr. Harsh Vardhan, Dr. Girish Sahni

  • Dr D. Srinivasa Reddy receiving the prestigious “SHANTI SWARUP BHATNAGAR” award at the occasion of the 75th Foundation day of CSIR.

Shanti Swarup Bhatnagar awardees with the honorable Prime Minister of India

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NCL PUNE

DSR Group

//////////WO-2016181414, WO 2016181414,  IVACAFTOR, new patent, COUNCIL OF SCIENTIFIC & INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH,  Anusandhan Bhawan, Rafi Marg New Delhi, INDIA, CSIR, Dr. D. Srinivasa Reddy

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Nov 222016
 

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Now online – Stimuli article on the proposed USP General Chapter “The Analytical Procedure Lifecycle <1220>”
A Stimuli Article to the Revision Process regarding the proposed New USP General Chapter “The Analytical Procedure Lifecycle <1220>” has been published. Read more about the new concept for the lifecycle managment of analytical methods.

http://www.gmp-compliance.org/enews_05629_Now-online—Stimuli-article-on-the-proposed-USP-General-Chapter-%22The-Analytical-Procedure-Lifecycle–1220-%22_15438,Z-PDM_n.html

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The General Chapters—Chemical Analysis Expert Committee is currently developing a new general chapter <1220> The Analytical Procedure Lifecycle. The purpose of this new chapter will be to more fully address the entire procedure lifecycle and define concepts that may be useful.

A Stimuli article on the proposed General Chapter <1220> has been approved for publication in Pharmacopeial Forum 43(1) [Jan.-Feb. 2017]. USP is providing this Stimuli article in advance of its publication to provide additional time for comments.

In addition to offering a preview of the proposed general chapter, the General Chapters—Chemical Analysis Expert Committee and the Validation and Verification Expert Panel are seeking specific input from users in the pharmaceutical industry regarding the following questions:

  • Would a general chapter on the lifecycle approach be valuable?
  • Is the information presented herein sufficient for implementation of an analytical procedure under the quality by design (QbD) approach?
  • Would incorporation of references to statistical tools, either in this chapter or in another chapter, be valuable?
  • Can you provide input or approaches that would improve this proposed general chapter?

The content and scope of the proposed general chapter will be refined on the basis of responses to this Stimuli article. Because stakeholders may have differing views, the objective of this Stimuli article is to identify and build areas of consensus that may be included in <1220>.

The approach is consistent with the concept of quality by design (QbD) as described in International Council for Harmonisation (ICH) Q8-R2, Q9, Q10, and Q11.

In order to provide a holistic approach to controlling an analytical procedure throughout its lifecycle, one can use a three-stage concept that is aligned with current process validation terminology:

  • Stage 1: Procedure Design and Development (Knowledge Gathering, Risk Assessment, Analytical Control Strategy, Knowledge Management, Preparing for Qualification)
  • Stage 2: Procedure Performance Qualification
  • Stage 3: Continued Procedure Performance Verification (Routine Monitoring, Changes to an Analytical Procedure)

A fundamental component of the lifecycle approach to analytical procedures is having a predefined objective that stipulates the performance requirements for the analytical procedure. These requirements are described in the analytical target profile (ATP) which can be considered as analogous to the quality target product profile (QTPP).

The Download Stimuli Article is available on the USP website since October 14, 2016: Proposed New USP General Chapter: The Analytical Procedure Lifecycle <1220>.

Comments will be accepted until March 31, 2017, the end of the comment period for Pharmacopeial Forum 43(1). This Stimuli article provides the framework for the proposed general chapter “The Analytical Procedure Lifecycle <1220>” and describes the current thinking of the USP Validation and Verification Expert Panel which advises the General Chapters—Chemical Analysis Expert Committee with regard to future trends in analytical procedures development, qualification, and continued monitoring.

 

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/////////////Stimuli article, proposed USP General Chapter, The Analytical Procedure Lifecycle,  <1220>

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Nov 222016
 

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Chapter 5 of the EC GMP Guide for the area of production was updated last year. This chapter contains concrete information about the conditions when testing and sampling of APIs and excipients can be reduced. Read more here about the sections 5.35 and 5.36 of the EU GMP Guide.

http://www.gmp-compliance.org/enews_05655_Opportunities-for-Reducing-Sampling-and-Testing-of-Starting-Materials_15461,15911,15462,Z-QCM_n.html

Chapter 5 of the EC GMP Guide for the area of production was already updated last year. However, not everybody really knows that it contains concrete information about the conditions when testing and sampling of APIs and excipients can be reduced. Particularly sections 5.35 and  5.36 include requirements and thus show possibilities for a reduction.

Basically, the manufacturers of finished products are responsible for every testing of starting materials as described in the marketing authorisation dossier. Yet, part of or complete test results from the approved starting material manufacturer can be used, but at least their identity has to be tested – as described in the in the marketing authorisation dossier.

If one chooses to outsource the testing activity to the supplier, this has to be justified and documented. Moreover, a few additional measures have to be fulfilled, like:

  • Particular attention should be paid to the distribution controls (transport, wholesaling, storage, delivery) to ensure that ultimately the test results are still applicable to the delivered material.
  • Performance of risk-based audits at the sites executing the testing and sampling of starting materials to verify the GMP compliance and to ensure that the specifications and testing methods are used as described in the marketing authorisation dossier.
  • The certificate of analysis of the manufacturer/supplier of the starting material should be signed by a designated person with appropriate qualifications and experience. The signature confirms the compliance with the agreed product specification.
  • The medicinal product manufacturer should have adequate experience in dealing with the starting material manufacturer – including assessment of batches previously received and the history of compliance before reducing own, internal testing.
  • At appropriate intervals, the medicinal product manufacturer or another approved contract laboratory has to carry out a full analysis to compare the test results with the results of the certificate of analysis of the material manufacturer or supplier, and thus to check their reliability. In case of discrepancy, an investigation has to be performed and appropriate measures taken. The certificates of analysis cannot be accepted until those measures are completed.

You can access the complete Chapter 5 “Production” of the EU GMP Guide here.
////////Opportunities,  Reducing,  Sampling, Testing, Starting Materials, EC GMP Guide

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Nov 222016
 

 

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A Policy Document recently published by the EDQM describes regulations for referencing already existing CEPs in an application for a new CEP. Read more about how the certificates of an intermediate or starting material have to be used in new applications for a CEP.

http://www.gmp-compliance.org/enews_05624_New-EDQM-s-Public-Document-informs-about-the-Details-required-in-a-New-CEP-Application-for-already-Referenced-Substances_15429,15332,15982,15721,S-WKS_n.html

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When applying for a Certificate of Suitability (CEP) for an API, detailed information has to be provided regarding the synthesis stages, the starting material and the intermediates. In the event that the starting materials or the intermediates are already covered by a CEP, the EDQM has recently published a “Public Document” entitled “Use of a CEP to describe a material used in an application for another CEP”. The document contains regulations on how to reference the “CEP X” of a starting material or an intermediate in the application for the “CEP Y” of an API. The requirements for both scenarios are described as follows:

  • CEP X belongs to an intermediate or a starting material within the synthesis route of a substance Y for which a CEP is submitted.
    1. The submission must make clear that X is really an intermediate or a starting material and is covered by a valid CEP (“CEP X”). A copy of this CEP X has to be attached.
    2. The complete specification described in the CEP X must be the basis for the release of the intermediate or the starting materials X for use in the synthesis of Y.
    3. The lifecycle of CEP X is directly coupled with the lifecycle of CEP Y. For example, a revision of CEP X also triggers a revision of CEP Y so that the revised CEP X has to be included to the revision application of CEP Y.
    4. If the CEP X looses its validity (e.g. due to expiry or withdrawal) the application for CEP Y has to be updated, for example the CEP of a substance from an alternative source has to be submitted.
    5. The application for CEP Y has to include complete details about the supply chain and/ or about all the manufacturing sites involved in the process described on CEP X.

Details about all manufacturing sites involved in the process described in the CEP X will also be mentioned in the annex 1 of the new CEP Y when X is an intermediate for the synthesis of Y. However, this doesn’t apply when X is the starting material for the synthesis of Y.

Please see the Public Document “Use of a CEP to describe a material used in an application for another CEP” for further details.

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STR1

////////// EDQM,  Public Document,  New CEP Application, already Referenced Substances

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Nov 222016
 

 

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EMA/ FDA Mutual Recognition Agreement moving forward
A possible agreement between the EMA and the US FDA on mutual recognition agreement on drug facility inspections could already be signed in January 2017.

http://www.gmp-compliance.org/enews_05650_EMA–FDA-Mutual-Recognition-Agreement-moving-forward_15642,15660,15656,Z-QAMPP_n.html

A possible agreement between the European Medicines Agency EMA and the US Food and Drug Administration FDA on mutual recognition of drug facility inspections could already be signed in January 2017. This is noted in a report of the EU Commission: “The state-of-play and the organisation of the evaluation of the US and the EU GMP inspectorates were discussed. In light of the progress achieved, the conclusion of a mutual recognition agreement of Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs) inspections by January 2017 is under consideration.”

But, according to the Commission, some issues are still not resolved – like, for example, the exchange of confidential information and the inclusion of veterinary products in the scope of the text.

The “Report of the 15th Round of Negotations for the Transatlantic Trade and Invesment Partnership” summaries the 15th round of negotiations for the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) from 3rd to 7th October 2016 in New York.

////////EMA, FDA,  Mutual Recognition Agreement, drug facility inspections

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Nov 052016
 

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Hearty Welcome to International Symposium, NTAC – 2017

The organizing committee of NTAC – 2017 and The Post Graduate and Research Department of Chemistry, Sacred Heart College (Autonomous),Thevara, Kochi , India are pleased to announce and invite you to attend the Prof. K.V. Thomas Endowment International symposium on New Trends in Applied Chemistry-2017 (NTAC-2017).

Prof. K.V. Thomas Endowment International Symposium on New Trends in Applied Chemistry (NTAC -2017)9-11 February, 2017, Department of Chemistry, Sacred Heart College (Autonomous), Thevara, Kochi, India link ishttp://www.ntac.shcollege.in/ please click

 

Symposium Dates: 9-11 February, 2017
Last Date for Abstract Submission: 9th December 2016
Last Date for Submission of Full Paper: 9th January 2017
Early Bird Registration: 9th December 2016

SH Symposium

Hearty Welcome to International Symposium, NTAC – 2017

The organizing committee of NTAC – 2017 and The Post Graduate and Research Department of Chemistry, Sacred Heart College (Autonomous),Thevara, Kochi are pleased to announce and invite you to attend the Prof. K.V. Thomas Endowment International symposium on New Trends in Applied Chemistry-2017 (NTAC-2017).
VENUE

Inaugural Session:  Sacred Heart College,Thevara

Technical Sessions:  Crowne Plaza, Kochi

Eminent scholars and young investigators, covering different parts of the globe are expected to participate in the symposium.
The theme of the three day symposium cover the following areas:

  • Medicinal and Pharmaceutical chemistry
  • Flow chemistry
  • Synthesis of natural and unnatural materials
  • Enzymes and biochemistry
  • Organometallic/Catalysis
  • Material science
  • Polymer chemistry
  • Computational chemistry

We cordially invite you to present your most recent research accomplishments, share your knowledge, and actively engage in scientific discourse with other experts in NTAC-2017.

CONTACT
Dr. Grace Thomas
Convener, NTAC – 2017
The Post Graduate and Research Department of Chemistry,
Sacred Heart College (Autonomous), Thevara Kochi-682013 Kerala, India
Ph: +91-9447124334 E-mail: ntac2017@shcollege.ac.in
www.ntac.shcollege.in

http://www.ntac.shcollege.in/

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