AUTHOR OF THIS BLOG

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO, WORLDDRUGTRACKER

Development of a concise, scalable synthesis of a CCR1 antagonist utilizing a continuous flow Curtius rearrangement

 FLOW CHEMISTRY, flow synthesis, phase 1  Comments Off on Development of a concise, scalable synthesis of a CCR1 antagonist utilizing a continuous flow Curtius rearrangement
Jan 212017
 

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Development of a concise, scalable synthesis of a CCR1 antagonist utilizing a continuous flow Curtius rearrangement

Green Chem., 2017, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6GC03123D, Paper
Maurice A. Marsini, Frederic G. Buono, Jon C. Lorenz, Bing-Shiou Yang, Jonathan T. Reeves, Kanwar Sidhu, Max Sarvestani, Zhulin Tan, Yongda Zhang, Ning Li, Heewon Lee, Jason Brazzillo, Laurence J. Nummy, J. C. Chung, Irungu K. Luvaga, Bikshandarkoil A. Narayanan, Xudong Wei, Jinhua J. Song, Frank Roschangar, Nathan K. Yee, Chris H. Senanayake
A convergent and robust synthesis of a developmental CCR1 antagonist is described using continuous flow technology

http://pubs.rsc.org/en/Content/ArticleLanding/2017/GC/C6GC03123D?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+rss%2FGC+%28RSC+-+Green+Chem.+latest+articles%29#!divAbstract

A convergent, robust, and concise synthesis of a developmental CCR1 antagonist is described using continuous flow technology. In the first approach, following an expeditious SNAr sequence for cyclopropane introduction, a safe, continuous flow Curtius rearrangement was developed for the synthesis of a p-methoxybenzyl (PMB) carbamate. Based on kinetic studies, a highly efficient and green process comprising three chemical transformations (azide formation, rearrangement, and isocyanate trapping) was developed with a relatively short residence time and high material throughput (0.8 kg h−1, complete E-factor = ∼9) and was successfully executed on 40 kg scale. Moreover, mechanistic studies enabled the execution of a semi-continuous, tandem Curtius rearrangement and acid–isocyanate coupling to directly afford the final drug candidate in a single, protecting group-free operation. The resulting API synthesis is further determined to be extremely green (RPG = 166%) relative to the industrial average for molecules of similar complexity.

Development of a concise, scalable synthesis of a CCR1 antagonist utilizing a continuous flow Curtius rearrangement

*Corresponding authors
aDepartment of Chemical Development, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc., 900 Ridgebury Road, Ridgefield, USA
E-mail: maurice.marsini@boehringer-ingelheim.com
Green Chem., 2017, Advance Article

DOI: 10.1039/C6GC03123D

 

Capture STR0 STR1

 

STR0 STR1

1-(4-fluorophenyl)-N-(1-(2-(methylsulfonyl)pyridin-4-yl)cyclopropyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4- c]pyridine-4-carboxamide

1-(4-fluorophenyl)-N-(1-(2-(methylsulfonyl)pyridin-4-yl)cyclopropyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4- c]pyridine-4-carboxamide

m.p. = 140-144 °C;

1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) δ 9.76 (s, 1H), 9.43 (s, 1H), 8.95 (s, 1H), 8.70 (s, 1H), 8.68 (d, J = 5.2 Hz, 1H), 7.93 (s, J1 = 8.8 Hz, J2 = 4.7 Hz, 1H), 7.82 (s, 1H), 7.54 (d, J = 4.1 Hz, 1H), 7.49 (t, J = 8.7 Hz, 1H), 3.29 (s, 3H), 1.61 (bs, 4H);

13C NMR (100 MHz, CDCl3) δ 166.1, 162.7, 160.3, 158.4, 156.9, 150.6, 139.2, 138.2, 135.8, 135.6, 125.4 (d, JC-F = 8.8 Hz), 123.3, 121.9, 117.2 (d, JC-F = 23.1 Hz), 116.4, 40.2, 34.9, 20.9;

HRMS: calcd for C22H19FN5O3S [M + H+ ]: 452.1187. Found: 452.1189.

 

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//////////BI-638683, BI 638683, CCR1 antagonist, 295298-26-8, US2012270870, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, phase 1

CS(=O)(=O)c1nccc(c1)C2(CC2)NC(=O)c5cncc3c5cnn3c4ccc(F)cc4

SCHEMBL1670702.png

Molecular Formula: C22H18FN5O3S
Molecular Weight: 451.476 g/mol

CCR1 antagonist

cas 295298-26-8

US2012270870

maybe BI-638683, not sure

In September 2010, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase I study (NCT01195688; 1279.1; 2010-021187-15) was initiated in healthy male volunteers (expected n = 64) in Germany, to assess the safety, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of BI-638683. The study was completed in December 2010 . In June 2014, data were presented at the EULAR 2014 Annual Meeting in Paris, France. A dose of 75-mg showed maximal inhibition of mRNA expression of the four-CC chemokine receptor type-I dependent marker genes. chemokine ligand -2  and Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-mRNAs by doses of 300 mg and higher, and for Ras-related protein rab-7b mRNA by doses of 500 mg and higher

Boehringer Ingelheim was developing BI-638683, a CCR1 antagonist, for the potential oral treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. A phase I trial was completed in December 2010 . Phase I data was presented in June 2014

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2011049917&recNum=1&maxRec=&office=&prevFilter=&sortOption=&queryString=&tab=PCTDescription

Inventors Brian Nicholas Cook, Daniel Kuzmich, Can Mao, Hossein Razavi
Applicant Boehringer Ingelheim International Gmbh

Chemotactic Cytokine Receptor 1 (CCRl) belongs to a large family (>20) of chemotactic cytokine (chemokine) receptors that interact with specific chemokines (>50) to mediate leukocyte trafficking, granule exocytosis, gene transcription, mitogenic effects and apoptosis. Chemokines are best known for their ability to mediate basal and inflammatory leukocyte trafficking. The binding of at least three chemokines (MIP-1 alpha/CCL3, MCP3/CCL7 and RANTES/CCL5) to CCRl is responsible for the trafficking of monocytes, macrophages and THl cells to inflamed tissues of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and multiple sclerosis (MS) patients (Trebst et al. (2001) American J of Pathology 159 p. 1701). Macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha (MIP-1 alpha), macrophage chemoattractant protein 3 (MCP-3) and regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) are all found in the CNS of MS patients, while MIP-1 alpha and RANTES are found in the CNS in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model of MS (Review: Gerard

and Rollins (2001) Nature Immunology). Macrophages and Thl cells in the inflamed synovia of RA patients are major producers of MIP-1 alpha and RANTES, which continuously recruit leukocytes to the synovial tissues of RA patients to propagate chronic inflammation (Volin et al. (1998) Clin. Immunol. Immunopathology; Koch et al. (1994) J. Clin. Investigation; Conlon et al. (1995) Eur. J. Immunology). Antagonizing the interactions between CCR1 and its chemokine ligands is hypothesized to block chemotaxis of monocytes, macrophages and Thl cells to inflamed tissues and thereby ameliorate the chronic inflammation associated with autoimmune diseases such as RA and MS.

Evidence for the role of CCR1 in the development and progression of chronic inflammation associated with experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE), a model of multiple sclerosis, is based on both genetic deletion and small molecule antagonists of CCR1. CCR1 deficient mice were shown to exhibit reduced susceptibility (55% vs. 100%) and reduced severity (1.2 vs. 2.5) of active EAE (Rottman et al. (2000) Eur. J. Immunology). Furthermore, administration of small molecule antagonist of CCR1, with moderate affinity (K; = 120 nM) for rat CCR1, was shown to delay the onset and reduce the severity of EAE when administered intravenously (Liang et al. (2000) /. Biol. Chemistry). Treatment of mice with antibodies specific for the CCR1 ligand MIP- 1 alpha have also been shown to be effective in preventing development of acute and relapsing EAE by reducing the numbers of T cells and macrophages recruited to the CNS (Karpus et al. (1995) /. Immunology; Karpus and Kennedy (1997) /. Leukocyte Biology). Thus, at least one CCR1 ligand has been demonstrated to recruit leukocytes to the CNS and propagate chronic inflammation in EAE, providing further in vivo validation for the role of CCR1 in EAE and MS.

In vivo validation of CCR1 in the development and propagation of chronic inflammation associated with RA is also significant. For example, administration of a CCR1 antagonist in the collagen induced arthritis model (CIA) in DBA/1 mice has been shown to be effective in reducing synovial inflammation and joint destruction (Plater-Zyberk et al. (1997) Immunology Letters). Another publication described potent antagonists of murine CCR1 that reduced severity (58%) in LPS-accelerated collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), when administered orally {Biorganic and Medicinal Chemistry Letters 15, 2005, 5160-5164). Published results from a Phase lb clinical trial with an oral CCRl antagonist demonstrated a trend toward clinical improvement in the absence of adverse side effects (Haringman et al. (2003) Ann. Rheum. Dis.). One third of the patients achieved a 20% improvement in rheumatoid arthritis signs and symptoms (ACR20) on day 18 and CCRl positive cells were reduced by 70% in the synovia of the treated patients, with significant reduction in specific cell types including 50% reduction in CD4+ T cells, 50% reduction in CD8+ T cells and 34% reduction in macrophages.

Studies such as those cited above support a role for CCRl in MS and RA and provide a therapeutic rationale for the development of CCRl antagonists.

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Citarinostat

 phase 1  Comments Off on Citarinostat
Dec 192016
 

2D chemical structure of 1316215-12-9

str0

Citarinostat

Treatment of Hematological Malignancies, 

Molecular Formula, C24-H26-Cl-N5-O3, Molecular Weight, 467.9544,
RN: 1316215-12-9
UNII: 441P620G3P

  • 2-[(2-Chlorophenyl)phenylamino]-N-[7-(hydroxyamino)-7-oxoheptyl]-5-pyrimidinecarboxamide

2-((2-Chlorophenyl)phenylamino)-N-(7-(hydroxyamino)-7-oxoheptyl)-5-pyrimidinecarboxamide

5-Pyrimidinecarboxamide, 2-((2-chlorophenyl)phenylamino)-N-(7-(hydroxyamino)-7-oxoheptyl)-

ACY-241; HDAC-IN-2

Histone deacetylase-6 inhibitor

Acute myelogenous leukemia; Cancer; Mantle cell lymphoma; Multiple myeloma

Image result for ACY 241

  • Mechanism of ActionHDAC6 protein inhibitors

Highest Development Phases

  • Phase IIMultiple myeloma
  • Phase IMalignant melanoma; Non-small cell lung cancer; Solid tumours

Most Recent Events

  • 12 Dec 2016Chemical structure information added
  • 04 Dec 2016Efficacy and safety data from a phase Ia/Ib clinical trial in Multiple myeloma released by Acetylon
  • 03 Jun 2016Phase-II clinical trials in Multiple myeloma in USA (PO)

In December 2016, citarinostat was reported to be in phase 1 clinical development. The drug appears to be first disclosed in WO2011091213, claiming reverse amide derivatives as HDAC-6 inhibitors useful for treating multiple myeloma, Alzheimers disease and psoriasis.

HDAC-IN-2.png

Duzer John H. Van, Ralph Mazitschek, Walter Ogier, James Elliott Bradner, Guoxiang Huang, Dejian Xie, Nan Yu, Less «
Applicant Acetylon Pharmaceuticals

 

The identification of small organic molecules that affect specific biological functions is an endeavor that impacts both biology and medicine. Such molecules are useful as therapeutic agents and as probes of biological function. Such small molecules have been useful at elucidating signal transduction pathways by acting as chemical protein knockouts, thereby causing a loss of protein function. (Schreiber et al, J. Am. Chem. Soc, 1990, 112, 5583; Mitchison, Chem. and Biol., 1994, 15 3) Additionally, due to the interaction of these small molecules with particular biological targets and their ability to affect specific biological function (e.g. gene transcription), they may also serve as candidates for the development of new therapeutics.

One biological target of recent interest is histone deacetylase (HDAC) (see, for example, a discussion of the use of inhibitors of histone deacetylases for the treatment of cancer: Marks et al. Nature Reviews Cancer 2001, 7,194; Johnstone et al. Nature Reviews Drug Discovery 2002, 287). Post-translational modification of proteins through acetylation and deacetylation of lysine residues plays a critical role in regulating their cellular functions. HDACs are zinc hydrolases that modulate gene expression through deacetylation of the N-acetyl-lysine residues of histone proteins and other transcriptional regulators (Hassig et al Curr. Opin. Chem. Biol. 1997, 1, 300-308). HDACs participate in cellular pathways that control cell shape and differentiation, and an HDAC inhibitor has been shown effective in treating an otherwise recalcitrant cancer (Warrell et al J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 1998, 90, 1621-1625). At this time, eleven human HDACs, which use Zn as a cofactor, have been identified (Taunton et al. Science 1996, 272, 408-411 ; Yang et al. J. Biol. Chem. 1997, 272, 28001-28007. Grozinger et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sd. U.S.A. 1999, 96, 4868-4873; Kao et al. Genes Dev. 2000, 14, 55-66. Hu et al J. Biol. Chem. 2000, 275, 15254-15264; Zhou et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Scl U.S.A. 2001, 98, 10572-10577; Venter et al. Science 2001, 291, 1304-1351) these members fall into three classes (class I, II, and IV). An additional seven HDACs h ave been identified which use NAD as a cofactor. To date, no small molecules are known that selectively target any particular class or individual members of this family ((for example ortholog- selective HDAC inhibitors have been reported: (a) Meinke et al. J. Med. Chem. 2000, 14, 4919-4922; (b) Meinke, et al Curr. Med. Chem. 2001, 8, 211-235). There remains a need for preparing structurally diverse HDAC and tubulin deacetylase (TDAC) inhibitors particularly ones that are potent and/or selective inhibitors of particular classes of HDACs or TDACs and individual HDACs and TDACs.

Recently, a cytoplasmic histone deacetylase protein, HDAC6, was identified as necessary for aggresome formation and for survival of cells following ubiquitinated misfolded protein stress. The aggresome is an integral component of survival in cancer cells. The mechanism of HDAC6-mediated aggresome formation is a consequence of the catalytic activity of the carboxy-terminal deacetylase domain, targeting an uncharacterized non-histone target. The present invention also provides small molecule inhibitors of HDAC6. In certain embodiments, these new compounds are potent and selective inhibitors of HDAC6.

The aggresome was first described in 1998, when it was reported that there was an appearance of microtubule-associated perinuclear inclusion bodies in cells over- expressing the pathologic AF508 allele of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance receptor (CFTR). Subsequent reports identified a pathologic appearance of the aggresome with over-expressed presenilin-1 (Johnston JA, et al. J Cell Biol. 1998;143:1883-1898), parkin (Junn E, et al. J Biol Chem. 2002; 277: 47870-47877), peripheral myelin protein PMP22 (Notterpek L, et al. Neurobiol Dis. 1999; 6: 450-460), influenza virus nucleoprotein (Anton LC, et al. J Cell Biol. 1999;146:113-124), a chimera of GFP and the membrane transport protein pi 15 (Garcia- Mata R, et al. J Cell Biol. 1999; 146: 1239-1254) and notably amyloidogenic light chains (Dul JL, et al. J Cell Biol. 2001;152:705-716). Model systems have been established to study ubiquitinated (AF508 CFTR) (Johnston JA, et al. J Cell Biol. 1998;143:1883-1898) and non-ubiquitinated (GFP -250) (Garcia-Mata R, et al. J Cell Biol. 1999;146:1239-1254) protein aggregate transport to the aggresome. Secretory, mutated, and wild-type proteins may assume unstable kinetic intermediates resulting in stable aggregates incapable of degradation through the narrow channel of the 26S proteasome. These complexes undergo active, retrograde transport by dynein to the pericentriolar aggresome, mediated in part by a cytoplasmic histone deacetylase, HDAC6 (Kawaguchi Y, et al. Cell. 2003;1 15:727-738).

Histone deacetylases are a family of at least 11 zinc -binding hydrolases, which

catalyze the deacetylation of lysine residues on histone proteins. HDAC inhibition results in hyperacetylation of chromatin, alterations in transcription, growth arrest, and apoptosis in cancer cell lines. Early phase clinical trials with available nonselective HDAC inhibitors demonstrate responses in hematologic malignancies including multiple myeloma, although with significant toxicity. Of note, in vitro synergy of conventional chemotherapy agents (such as melphalan) with bortezomib has been reported in myeloma cell lines, though dual proteasome-aggresome inhibition was not proposed. Until recently selective HDAC inhibitors have not been realized.

HDAC6 is required for aggresome formation with ubiquitinated protein stress and is essential for cellular viability in this context. HDAC6 is believed to bind ubiquitinated proteins through a zinc finger domain and interacts with the dynein motor complex through another discrete binding motif. HDAC6 possesses two catalytic deacetylase domains. It is not presently known whether the amino-terminal histone deacetylase or the carboxy-terminal tubulin deacetylase (TDAC) domain mediates aggresome formation.

Aberrant protein catabolism is a hallmark of cancer, and is implicated in the stabilization of oncogenic proteins and the degradation of tumor suppressors (Adams J. Nat Rev Cancer. 2004;4:349-360). Tumor necrosis factor alpha induced activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFKB) is a relevant example, mediated by NFKB inhibitor beta (1KB) proteolytic degradation in malignant plasma cells. The inhibition of 1KB catabolism by proteasome inhibitors explains, in part, the apoptotic growth arrest of treated myeloma cells (Hideshima T, et al. Cancer Res. 2001;61:3071-3076). Multiple myeloma is an ideal system for studying the mechanisms of protein degradation in cancer. Since William Russell in 1890, cytoplasmic inclusions have been regarded as a defining histological feature of malignant plasma cells. Though the precise composition of Russell bodies is not known, they are regarded as ER-derived vesicles containing aggregates of monotypic immunoglobulins

(Kopito RR, Sitia R. EMBO Rep. 2000; 1 :225-231) and stain positive for ubiquitin (Manetto V, et al. Am J Pathol. 1989;134:505-513). Russell bodies have been described with CFTR over-expression in yeast (Sullivan ML, et al. J. Histochem. Cytochem. 2003;51 :545-548), thus raising the suspicion that these structures may be linked to overwhelmed protein catabolism, and potentially the aggresome. The role of the aggresome in cancer remains undefined.

Aberrant histone deacetylase activity has also been linked to various neurological and neurodegenerative disorders, including stroke, Huntington’s disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Alzheimer’s disease. HDAC inhibition may induce the expression of antimitotic and anti-apoptotic genes, such as p21 and HSP-70, which facilitate survival. HDAC inhibitors can act on other neural cell types in the central nervous system, such as reactive astrocytes and microglia, to reduce inflammation and secondary damage during neuronal injury or disease. HDAC inhibition is a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of a range of central nervous system disorders (Langley B et al., 2005, Current Drug Targets— CNS & Neurological Disorders, 4: 41-50).

Histone deacetylase is known to play an essential role in the transcriptional machinery for regulating gene expression, induce histone hyperacetylation and to affect the gene expression. Therefore, it is useful as a therapeutic or prophylactic agent for diseases caused by abnormal gene expression such as inflammatory disorders, diabetes, diabetic

complications, homozygous thalassemia, fibrosis, cirrhosis, acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL), organ transplant rejections, autoimmune diseases, protozoal infections, tumors, etc.

Thus, there remains a need for the development of novel inhibitors of histone deacetylases and tubulin histone deacetylases. In particular, inhibitors that are more potent and/or more specific for their particular target than known HDAC and TDAC inhibitors. HDAC inhibitors specific for a certain class or member of the HDAC family would be particularly useful both in the treatment of proliferative diseases and protein deposition disorders and in the study of HDACs, particularly HDAC6. Inhibitors that are specific for HDAC versus TDAC and vice versa are also useful in treating disease and probing biological pathways. The present invention provides novel compounds, pharmaceutical compositions thereof, and methods of using these compounds to treat disorders related to HDAC6 including cancers, inflammatory, autoimmune, neurological and neurodegenerative disorders

Image result for ACY 241

Rocilinostat (ACY-1215)

Image result for ACY 241

PATENT

WO2011091213

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2011091213

Patent

US20160355486

WO 2013013113

WO 2015061684

WO 2015054474

US 20150099744

PATENT

CITARINOSTAT BY ACTYLON

WO-2016200919

Crystalline forms of a histone deacetylase inhibitor

Novel crystalline polymorphic forms of citarinostat, useful for treating cancer, eg multiple myeloma, mantle cell lymphoma or acute myelogenous leukemia. Also claims a method for preparing the crystalline form of citarinostat. Acetylon is developing citarinostat, a next generation selective inhibitor of HDAC6, for treating multiple myeloma and solid tumors, including melanoma.

Provided herein are crystalline forms of 2-((2-chlorophenyl)(phenyl)amino)-N-(7-(hydroxyamino)-7-oxoheptyl)pyrimidine-5-carboxamide (CAS No. 1316215-12-9), shown as Compound (I) (and referred to herein as “Compound (I)”):

Compound (I) is disclosed in International Patent Application No.

PCT/US2011/021982 and U.S. Patent No. 8,609,678, the entire contents of which are incorporated herein by reference.

Accordingly, provided herein are crystalline forms of 2-((2-chlorophenyl)(phenyl)amino)-N-(7-(hydroxyamino)-7-oxoheptyl)pyrimidine-5-carboxamide. In particular, provided herein are the following crystalline forms of Compound (I): Form I, Form II, Form III, Form IV, Form V, Form VI, Form VII, Form VIII, and Form IX. Each of these forms have been characterized by XRPD analysis. In an embodiment, the crystalline form of 2-((2-chlorophenyl)(phenyl)amino)-N-(7-(hydroxyamino)-7-oxoheptyl)pyrimidine-5-carboxamide can be a hydrate or solvate (e.g., dichloromethane or methanol).

EXAMPLES

Example 1: Synthesis of 2-((2-chlorophenyl)(phenyl)amino)-N-(7-(hydroxyamino)-7- oxoheptyl)pyrimidine-5-carboxamide (Compound (I))

I. Synthesis of 2-(diphenylamino)-N-(7-(hydroxyamino)-7-oxoheptyl)pyrimidine-5-carboxamide:

Synthesis of Intermediate 2: A mixture of aniline (3.7 g, 40 mmol), compound 1 (7.5 g, 40 mmol), and K2C03 (11 g, 80 mmol) in DMF (100 ml) was degassed and stirred at 120 °C under N2 overnight. The reaction mixture was cooled to r.t. and diluted with EtOAc (200 ml), then washed with saturated brine (200 ml χ 3). The organic layers were separated and dried over Na2S04, evaporated to dryness and purified by silica gel chromatography (petroleum ethers/EtOAc = 10/1) to give the desired product as a white solid (6.2 g, 64 %).

Synthesis of Intermediate 3: A mixture of compound 2 (6.2 g, 25 mmol), iodobenzene (6.12 g, 30 mmol), Cul (955 mg, 5.0 mmol), Cs2C03 (16.3 g, 50 mmol) in TEOS (200 ml) was degassed and purged with nitrogen. The resulting mixture was stirred at 140 °C for 14 hrs. After cooling to r.t., the residue was diluted with EtOAc (200 ml). 95% EtOH (200 ml) and H4F-H20 on silica gel [50g, pre-prepared by the addition of H4F (lOOg) in water (1500 ml) to silica gel (500g, 100-200 mesh)] was added, and the resulting mixture was kept at r.t. for 2 hrs. The solidified materials were filtered and washed with EtOAc. The filtrate was evaporated to dryness and the residue was purified by silica gel chromatography (petroleum ethers/EtOAc = 10/1) to give a yellow solid (3 g, 38%).

Synthesis of Intermediate 4: 2N NaOH (200 ml) was added to a solution of compound 3 (3.0 g, 9.4 mmol) in EtOH (200 ml). The mixture was stirred at 60 °C for 30min. After evaporation of the solvent, the solution was neutralized with 2N HCl to give a white precipitate. The suspension was extracted with EtOAc (2 χ 200 ml), and the organic layers were separated, washed with water (2 χ 100 ml), brine (2 χ 100 ml), and dried over Na2S04. Removal of the solvent gave a brown solid (2.5 g, 92 %).

Synthesis of Intermediate 6: A mixture of compound 4 (2.5 g, 8.58 mmol), compound 5 (2.52 g, 12.87 mmol), HATU (3.91 g, 10.30 mmol), and DIPEA (4.43 g, 34.32 mmol) was stirred at r.t. overnight. After the reaction mixture was filtered, the filtrate was evaporated to dryness and the residue was purified by silica gel chromatography (petroleum ethers/EtOAc = 2/1) to give a brown solid (2 g, 54 %).

Synthesis of 2-(diphenylamino)-N-(7-(hydroxyamino)-7-oxoheptyl)pyrimidine-5-carboxamide: A mixture of the compound 6 (2.0 g, 4.6 mmol), sodium hydroxide (2N, 20 mL) in MeOH (50 ml) and DCM (25 ml) was stirred at 0 °C for 10 min. Hydroxylamine (50%) (10 ml) was cooled to 0 °C and added to the mixture. The resulting mixture was stirred at r.t. for 20 min. After removal of the solvent, the mixture was neutralized with 1M HCl to give a white precipitate. The crude product was filtered and purified by pre-HPLC to give a white solid (950 mg, 48%).

II. Synthetic Route 1 : 2-((2-chlorophenyl)(phenyl)amino)-N-(7-(hydroxyamino)-7-oxoheptvDpyrimidine-5-carboxamide

Synthesis of Intermediate 2: A mixture of aniline (3.7 g, 40 mmol), ethyl 2-chloropyrimidine-5-carboxylate 1 (7.5 g, 40 mmol), K2C03 (11 g, 80 mmol) in DMF (100 ml) was degassed and stirred at 120 °C under N2 overnight. The reaction mixture was cooled to rt and diluted with EtOAc (200 ml), then washed with saturated brine (200 ml x 3). The organic layer was separated and dried over Na2S04, evaporated to dryness and purified by silica gel

chromatography (petroleum ethers/EtOAc = 10/1) to give the desired product as a white solid (6.2 g, 64 %).

Synthesis of Intermediate 3: A mixture of compound 2 (69.2 g, 1 equiv.), l-chloro-2-iodobenzene (135.7 g, 2 equiv.), Li2C03 (42.04 g, 2 equiv.), K2C03 (39.32 g, 1 equiv.), Cu (1 equiv. 45 μπι) in DMSO (690 ml) was degassed and purged with nitrogen. The resulting mixture was stirred at 140 °C for 36 hours. Work-up of the reaction gave compound 3 at 93 % yield.

Synthesis of Intermediate 4: 2N NaOH (200 ml) was added to a solution of the compound 3 (3.0 g, 9.4 mmol) in EtOH (200 ml). The mixture was stirred at 60 °C for 30min. After evaporation of the solvent, the solution was neutralized with 2N HC1 to give a white precipitate. The suspension was extracted with EtOAc (2 x 200 ml), and the organic layer was separated, washed with water (2 x 100 ml), brine (2 x 100 ml), and dried over Na2S04. Removal of solvent gave a brown solid (2.5 g, 92 %).

Synthesis of Intermediate 5: A procedure analogous to the Synthesis of Intermediate 6 in Part I of this Example was used.

Synthesis of 2-((2-chlorophenyl)(phenyl)amino)-N-(7-(hydroxyamino)-7-oxoheptyl)pyrimidine-5-carboxamide: A procedure analogous to the Synthesis of 2-(diphenylamino)-N-(7-(hydroxyamino)-7-oxoheptyl)pyrimidine-5-carboxamide in Part I of this Example was used.

III. Synthetic Route 2: 2-((2-chlorophenyl)(phenyl)amino)-N-(7-(hydroxyamino)-7-oxoheptyl)pyrimidine-5-carboxamide

(I)

Step (1): Synthesis of Compound 11: Ethyl 2-chloropyrimidine-5-carboxylate (7.0 Kgs), ethanol (60 Kgs), 2-Chloroaniline (9.5 Kgs, 2 eq) and acetic acid (3.7 Kgs, 1.6 eq) were charged to a reactor under inert atmosphere. The mixture was heated to reflux. After at least 5 hours the reaction was sampled for HPLC analysis (method TM-113.1016). When analysis indicated reaction completion, the mixture was cooled to 70 ± 5 °C and N,N-Diisopropylethylamine (DIPEA) was added. The reaction was then cooled to 20 ± 5°C and the mixture was stirred for an additional 2-6 hours. The resulting precipitate is filtered and washed with ethanol (2 x 6 Kgs) and heptane (24 Kgs). The cake is dried under reduced pressure at 50 ± 5 °C to a constant weight to produce 8.4 Kgs compound 11 (81% yield and 99.9% purity.

Step (2): Synthesis of Compound 3: Copper powder (0.68 Kgs, 1 eq, <75 micron), potassium carbonate (4.3 Kgs, 1.7 eq), and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO, 12.3 Kgs) were added to a reactor (vessel A). The resulting solution was heated to 120 ± 5°C. In a separate reactor (vessel B), a solution of compound 11 (2.9 Kgs) and iodobenzene (4.3 Kgs, 2 eq) in DMSO (5.6 Kgs) was heated at 40 ± 5°C. The mixture was then transferred to vessel A over 2-3 hours. The reaction mixture was heated at 120 ± 5°C for 8-24 hours, until HPLC analysis (method TM-113.942) determined that < 1% compound 11 was remaining.

Step (3): Synthesis of Compound 4: The mixture of Step (2) was cooled to 90-100 °C and purified water (59 Kgs) was added. The reaction mixture was stirred at 90-100 °C for 2-8 hours until HPLC showed that <1% compound 3 was remaining. The reactor was cooled to 25 °C. The reaction mixture was filtered through Celite, then a 0.2 micron filter, and the filtrate was collected. The filtrate was extracted with methyl t-butyl ether twice (2 x 12.8 Kgs). The aqueous layer was cooled to 0-5 °C, then acidified with 6N hydrochloric acid (HC1) to pH 2-3 while keeping the temperature < 25°C. The reaction was then cooled to 5-15 °C. The precipitate was filtered and washed with cold water. The cake was dried at 45-55 °C under reduced pressure to constant weight to obtain 2.2 kg (65% yield) compound 4 in 90.3% AUC purity.

Step (4): Synthesis of Compound 5: Dichloromethane (40.3 Kgs), DMF (33g, 0.04 eq) and compound 4 (2.3 Kg) were charged to a reaction flask. The solution was filtered through a 0.2 μπι filter and was returned to the flask. Oxalyl chloride (0.9 Kgs, 1 eq) was added via addition funnel over 30-120 minutes at < 30 °C. The batch was then stirred at < 30°C until reaction completion (compound 4 <3 %) was confirmed by HPLC (method TM-113.946. Next, the dichloromethane solution was concentrated and residual oxalyl chloride was removed under reduced pressure at < 40 °C. When HPLC analysis indicated that < 0.10% oxalyl chloride was remaining, the concentrate was dissolved in fresh dichloromethane (24 Kgs) and transferred back to the reaction vessel (Vessel A).

A second vessel (Vessel B) was charged with Methyl 7-aminoheptanoate

hydrochloride (Compound Al, 1.5 Kgs, 1.09 eq), DIPEA (2.5 Kgs, 2.7 eq), 4

(Dimethylamino)pyridine (DMAP, 42g, 0.05 eq), and DCM (47.6 Kgs). The mixture was cooled to 0-10 °C and the acid chloride solution in Vessel A was transferred to Vessel B while maintaining the temperature at 5 °C to 10 °C. The reaction is stirred at 5-10 °C for 3 to 24 hours at which point HPLC analysis indicated reaction completion (method TM-113.946, compound 4 <5%). The mixture was then extracted with a 1M HC1 solution (20 Kgs), purified water (20 Kgs), 7% sodium bicarbonate (20 Kgs), purified water (20 Kgs), and 25% sodium chloride solution (20 Kgs). The dichloromethane was then vacuumdistilled at < 40 °C and chased repeatedly with isopropyl alcohol. When analysis indicated that <1 mol% DCM was remaining, the mixture was gradually cooled to 0-5 °C and was stirred at 0-5 °C for an at least 2 hours. The resulting precipitate was collected by filtration and washed with cold isopropyl alcohol (6.4 Kgs). The cake was sucked dry on the filter for 4-24 hours, then was further dried at 45-55 °C under reduced pressure to constant weight. 2.2 Kgs (77% yield) was isolated in 95.9% AUC purity method and 99.9 wt %.

Step (5): Synthesis of Compound (I): Hydroxylamine hydrochloride (3.3 Kgs, 10 eq) and methanol (9.6 Kgs) were charged to a reactor. The resulting solution was cooled to 0-5 °C and 25% sodium methoxide (11.2 Kgs, 11 eq) was charged slowly, maintaining the temperature at 0-10 °C. Once the addition was complete, the reaction was mixed at 20 °C for 1-3 hours and filtered, and the filter cake was washed with methanol (2 x 2.1 Kgs). The filtrate (hydroxylamine free base) was returned to the reactor and cooled to 0±5°C.

Compound 5 (2.2 Kgs) was added. The reaction was stirred until the reaction was complete (method TM-113.964, compound 5 < 2%). The mixture was filtered and water (28 Kgs) and ethyl acetate (8.9 Kgs) were added to the filtrate. The pH was adjusted to 8 – 9 using 6N HC1 then stirred for up to 3 hours before filtering. The filter cake was washed with cold water (25.7 Kgs), then dried under reduced pressure to constant weight. The crude solid compound (I) was determined to be Form IV/ Pattern D.

The crude solid (1.87 Kgs) was suspended in isopropyl alcohol (IP A, 27.1 Kg). The slurry was heated to 75±5 °C to dissolve the solids. The solution was seeded with crystals of Compound (I) (Form I/Pattern A), and was allowed to cool to ambient temperature. The resulting precipitate was stirred for 1-2 hours before filtering. The filter cake was rinsed with IPA (2 x 9.5 Kgs), then dried at 45-55°C to constant weight under reduced pressure to result in 1.86 kg crystalline white solid Compound (I) (Form I/Pattern A) in 85% yield and 99.5% purity (AUC%, HPLC method TM-113.941).

HPLC Method 113.941

Column Zorbax Eclipse XDB-C18, 4.6 mm x 150 mm, 3.5 μπι

Column Temperature 40°C

UV Detection Wavelength Bandwidth 4 nm, Reference off, 272 nm

Flow rate 1.0 mL/min

Injection Volume 10 μΐ. with needle wash

Mobile Phase A 0.05% trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) in purified water

Mobile Phase B 0.04% TFA in acetonitrile

Data Collection 40.0 min

Run Time 46.0 min

Gradient Time (min) Mobile Phase A Mobile Phase B

0.0 98% 2%

36.0 0% 100%

40.0 0% 100%

40.1 98% 2%

46.0 98% 2%

Example 2: Summary of Results and Analytical Techniques

Table 1. Summary of the Isolated Crystalline Forms of Compound (I)

Patent ID Patent Title Submitted Date Granted Date
US2016030458 TREATMENT OF LEUKEMIA WITH HISTONE DEACETYLASE INHIBITORS 2015-07-06 2016-02-04
US2015176076 HISTONE DEACETYLASE 6 (HDAC6) BIOMARKERS IN MULTIPLE MYELOMA 2014-12-19 2015-06-25
US2015150871 COMBINATIONS OF HISTONE DEACETYLASE INHIBITORS AND IMMUNOMODULATORY DRUGS 2014-12-03 2015-06-04
US2015119413 TREATMENT OF POLYCYSTIC DISEASES WITH AN HDAC6 INHIBITOR 2014-10-24 2015-04-30
US2015105358 COMBINATIONS OF HISTONE DEACETYLASE INHIBITORS AND IMMUNOMODULATORY DRUGS 2014-10-07 2015-04-16
US2015105383 HDAC Inhibitors, Alone Or In Combination With PI3K Inhibitors, For Treating Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma 2014-10-08 2015-04-16
US2015105384 PYRIMIDINE HYDROXY AMIDE COMPOUNDS AS HISTONE DEACETYLASE INHIBITORS 2014-10-09 2015-04-16
US2015105409 HDAC INHIBITORS, ALONE OR IN COMBINATION WITH BTK INHIBITORS, FOR TREATING NONHODGKIN’S LYMPHOMA 2014-10-07 2015-04-16
US2015099744 COMBINATIONS OF HISTONE DEACETYLASE INHIBITORS AND EITHER HER2 INHIBITORS OR PI3K INHIBITORS 2014-10-06 2015-04-09
US2015045380 REVERSE AMIDE COMPOUNDS AS PROTEIN DEACETYLASE INHIBITORS AND METHODS OF USE THEREOF 2014-10-22 2015-02-12
Patent ID Patent Title Submitted Date Granted Date
US2014378385 Histone Deacetylase 6 Selective Inhibitors for the Treatment of Bone Disease 2012-07-20 2014-12-25
US2014142117 REVERSE AMIDE COMPOUNDS AS PROTEIN DEACETYLASE INHIBITORS AND METHODS OF USE THEREOF 2013-11-11 2014-05-22
US8609678 Reverse amide compounds as protein deacetylase inhibitors and methods of use thereof 2012-04-02 2013-12-17
US8148526 Reverse amide compounds as protein deacetylase inhibitors and methods of use thereof 2011-12-02 2012-04-03
US2011300134 REVERSE AMIDE COMPOUNDS AS PROTEIN DEACETYLASE INHIBITORS AND METHODS OF USE THEREOF 2011-12-08

 

Acetylon Crafts New Buyout Deal With Celgene, Spins Out Startup Regenacy

Acetylon Crafts New Buyout Deal With Celgene, Spins Out Startup Regenacy

In the deal, Summit, NJ-based Celgene (NASDAQ: CELG) will get partial rights to two drug candidates developed by Acetylon: citarinostat (also known as ACY-241), and ricolinostat (ACY-1215). Specifically, Celgene will get worldwide rights to develop both drugs for cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and autoimmune diseases, but nothing else.

Regenacy meanwhile, will also have partial rights to these two drugs, but only for other disease types, such as nerve pain. It also gets access to other preclinical drugs Acetylon has been developing for blood diseases like sickle cell disease and beta-thalassemia.

[Updated w/comments from CEO] Acetylon CEO Walter Ogier—who will be the president and CEO of Regenacy—said via e-mail that Celgene was only interested in the parts of Acetylon that fit with its current portfolio. Acetylon’s shareholders and executives, meanwhile, wanted to push the rest of the company’s experimental products forward. So the two companies let the original deal expire and came up with the new transaction.

“The remaining assets are exciting enough to create a new company to advance,” Ogier said.

Other “key members” of Acetylon’s executive team will switch over to the new company as well, according to the announcement. Ogier said Regenacy has acquired Acetylon’s remaining cash in the deal—he didn’t say how much—to get itself started.

Both citarinostat and ricolinostat interfere with what are known as histone deacetylases (HDACs), enzymes that help regulate gene expression and are implicated in a number of cancers. HDACs are a well-known molecular target, but Acetylon’s drugs are part of a newer breed of HDAC-blocking agents meant to be more precise, and thus less toxic, than their predecessors. Acetylon’s lead drug ricolinostat, for instance, is meant to block only the specific enzyme HDAC6. Citarinostat is a pill version of ricolinostat,

With Celgene’s help, Acetylon has been developing these drugs as potential treatments for breast cancer and the blood cancer multiple myeloma. It has been testing the drug in combination with Celgene’s own experimental drugs, like the myeloma drug pomalidomide (Pomalyst) and the breast cancer drug nab-paclitaxel (Abraxane).

[Updated w/CEO comments] Citarinostat, for instance, is being tested as a multiple myeloma treatment in a Phase 1b trial in combination with pomalidamide and dexamethasome in multiple myeloma. Acetylon and Celgene just reported early data at the American Society of Hematology’s annual meeting. Ricolinostat is in a mid-stage study in multiple myeloma as well as several investigator-sponsored studies in lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and ovarian and breast cancer, according to Ogier.

Regenacy will take ricolinostat into a Phase 2 trial in peripheral neuropathy next year, he says.

The two companies aren’t disclosing the terms of the deal. Co-founder and chairman Marc Cohen said in a statement that the deal is a “favorable outcome” for Acetylon’s shareholders—an unusual mix of private financiers, non-profits, public companies, and federal grant sources including Celgene itself, Kraft Group (the holding company founded by New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft), Cohen, and the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. (All of those shareholders aside from Celgene will be the owners of Regenacy.)

But it’s a different outcome than Acetylon and Celgene anticipated when they signed a broad deal in 2013. At that time, Celgene paid Acetylon $100 million for the option to buy it outright for at least an additional $500 million (the actual price was to be tied to an independent valuation). The deal included another $1.1 billion in “bio-bucks,” future payments tied to clinical progress that may or may not materialize. All told, that meant the Celgene deal could have been worth $1.7 billion to Acetylon and its shareholders. Acetylon raised $55 million from shareholders before it struck that deal with Celgene.

Celgene extended its partnership with Acetylon in the summer of 2015, but that included a contingency that the relationship would end in May 2016 if it didn’t buy Acetylon. A regulatory filing in July showed that’s exactly what happened: the collaboration between the two companies ended this year, and that Celgene was no longer on the hook for any future payments related to 2013 deal.

Though that deal is now history, Acetylon shareholders were at least able to generate some type of return—and take another shot on some of the same assets. Ogier said these shareholders have “ample capacity” to make further investments in Regenacy, though the company will try to find new partners to help move its programs forward as well.

“We are excited to continue Acetylon’s legacy through the receipt of rights to many of Acetylon’s most promising compounds and the continued advancement of these clinical and preclinical programs in disease indications outside of Celgene’s areas of strategic focus, where we believe patients may especially benefit from selective HDAC inhibition,” he said in a statement.

REFERENCES

http://www.acetylon.com/docs/ACE-MM-200_Poster_Final%20Draft.pdf

References:
[1].  Quayle SN, Almeciga-Pinto I, Tamang D, et al. Selective HDAC inhibition by ricolinostat (ACY-1215) or ACY-241 synergizes with IMiD® immunomodulatory drugs in Multiple Myeloma (MM) and Mantle Cell Lymphoma (MCL) cells. In: Proceedings of the 106th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research, 2015, Philadelphia, PA. Philadelphia (PA): AACR; Cancer Res 2015;75(15 Suppl):Abstract nr 5380.
[2].  Huang P, Almeciga-Pinto I, Jordan M, et al. Selective HDAC inhibition by ACY-241 enhances the activity of paclitaxel in solid tumor models. In: Proceedings of the 2015 AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics; 2015 Nov 5-9; Boston, Massachusetts. Philadelphia (PA): AACR

NMR

str0

HPLC

str0

////////////ACY-241,  HDAC-IN-2, PHASE 1, CITARINOSTAT, 1316215-12-9

ONC(=O)CCCCCCNC(=O)c1cnc(nc1)N(c2ccccc2)c3ccccc3Cl

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Sreeni Labs Private Limited, Hyderabad, India ready to deliver New, Economical, Scalable Routes to your advanced intermediates & API’s in early Clinical Drug Development Stages

 companies, INDIA, MANUFACTURING, new drugs, PRECLINICAL, PROCESS, regulatory  Comments Off on Sreeni Labs Private Limited, Hyderabad, India ready to deliver New, Economical, Scalable Routes to your advanced intermediates & API’s in early Clinical Drug Development Stages
Jul 162016
 

str1

 

Sreeni Labs Private Limited, Hyderabad, India is ready to take up challenging synthesis projects from your preclinical and clinical development and supply from few grams to multi-kilo quantities. Sreeni Labs has proven route scouting ability  to  design and develop innovative, cost effective, scalable routes by using readily available and inexpensive starting materials. The selected route will be further developed into a robust process and demonstrate on kilo gram scale and produce 100’s of kilos of in a relatively short time.

Accelerate your early development at competitive price by taking your route selection, process development and material supply challenges (gram scale to kilogram scale) to Sreeni Labs…………

INTRODUCTION

Sreeni Labs based in Hyderabad, India is working with various global customers and solving variety of challenging synthesis problems. Their customer base ranges from USA, Canada, India and Europe. Sreeni labs Managing Director, Dr. Sreenivasa Reddy Mundla has worked at Procter & Gamble Pharmaceuticals and Eli Lilly based in USA.

The main strength of Sreeni Labs is in the design, development of innovative and highly economical synthetic routes and development of a selected route into a robust process followed by production of quality product from 100 grams to 100s of kg scale. Sreeni Labs main motto is adding value in everything they do.

They have helped number of customers from virtual biotech, big pharma, specialty chemicals, catalog companies, and academic researchers and drug developers, solar energy researchers at universities and institutions by successfully developing highly economical and simple chemistry routes to number of products that were made either by very lengthy synthetic routes or  by using highly dangerous reagents and Suzuki coupling steps. They are able to supply materials from gram scale to multi kilo scale in a relatively short time by developing very short and efficient synthetic routes to a number of advanced intermediates, specialty chemicals, APIs and reference compounds. They also helped customers by drastically reducing number of steps, telescoping few steps into a single pot. For some projects, Sreeni Labs was able to develop simple chemistry and avoided use of palladium & expensive ligands. They always begin the project with end in the mind and design simple chemistry and also use readily available or easy to prepare starting materials in their design of synthetic routes

Over the years, Sreeni labs has successfully made a variety of products ranging from few mg to several kilogram scale. Sreeni labs has plenty of experience in making small select libraries of compounds, carbocyclic compounds like complex terpenoids, retinal derivatives, alkaloids, and heterocyclic compounds like multi substituted beta carbolines, pyridines, quinolines, quinolones, imidazoles, aminoimidazoles, quinoxalines, indoles, benzimidazoles, thiazoles, oxazoles, isoxazoles, carbazoles, benzothiazoles, azapines, benzazpines, natural and unnatural aminoacids, tetrapeptides, substituted oligomers of thiophenes and fused thiophenes, RAFT reagents, isocyanates, variety of ligands,  heteroaryl, biaryl, triaryl compounds, process impurities and metabolites.

Sreeni Labs is Looking for any potential opportunities where people need development of cost effective scalable routes followed by quick scale up to produce quality products in the pharmaceutical & specialty chemicals area. They can also take up custom synthesis and scale up of medchem analogues and building blocks.  They have flexible business model that will be in sink with customers. One can test their abilities & capabilities by giving couple of PO based (fee for service) projects.

Some of the compounds prepared by Sreeni labs;

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See presentation below

LINK ON SLIDESHARE

Managing Director at Sreeni Labs Private Limited

 

Few Case Studies : Source SEEENI LABS

QUOTE………….

One virtual biotech company customer from USA, through a common friend approached Sreeni Labs and told that they are buying a tetrapeptide from Bachem on mg scale at a very high price and requested us to see if we can make 5g. We accepted the challenge and developed solution phase chemistry and delivered 6g and also the process procedures in 10 weeks time. The customer told that they are using same procedures with very minor modifications and produced the tetrapeptide ip to 100kg scale as the molecule is in Phase III.

 

One East coast customer in our first meeting told that they are working with 4 CROs of which two are in India and two are in China and politely asked why they should work with Sreeni Labs. We told that give us a project where your CROs failed to deliver and we will give a quote and work on it. You pay us only if we deliver and you satisfy with the data. They immediately gave us a project to make 1.5g and we delivered 2g product in 9 weeks. After receiving product and the data, the customer was extremely happy as their previous CRO couldn’t deliver even a milligram in four months with 3 FTEs.

 

One Midwest biotech company was struggling to remove palladium from final API as they were doing a Suzuki coupling with a very expensive aryl pinacol borane and bromo pyridine derivative with an expensive ligand and relatively large amount of palldium acetate. The cost of final step catalyst, ligand and the palladium scavenging resin were making the project not viable even though the product is generating excellent data in the clinic. At this point we signed an FTE agreement with them and in four months time, we were able to design and develop a non suzuki route based on acid base chemistry and made 15g of API and compared the analytical data and purity with the Suzuki route API. This solved all three problems and the customer was very pleased with the outcome.

 

One big pharma customer from east coast, wrote a structure of chemical intermediate on a paper napkin in our first meeting and asked us to see if we can make it. We told that we can make it and in less than 3 weeks time we made a gram sample and shared the analytical data. The customer was very pleased and asked us to make 500g. We delivered in 4 weeks and in the next three months we supplied 25kg of the same product.

 

Through a common friend reference, a European customer from a an academic institute, sent us an email requesting us to quote for 20mg of a compound with compound number mentioned in J. med. chem. paper. It is a polycyclic compound with four contiguous stereogenic centers.  We gave a quote and delivered 35 mg of product with full analytical data which was more pure than the published in literature. Later on we made 8g and 6g of the same product.

 

One West coast customer approached us through a common friend’s reference and told that they need to improve the chemistry of an advanced intermediate for their next campaign. At that time they are planning to make 15kg of that intermediate and purchased 50kg of starting raw material for $250,000. They also put five FTEs at a CRO  for 5 months to optimize the remaining 5 steps wherein they are using LAH, Sodium azide,  palladium catalyst and a column chromatography. We requested the customer not to purchase the 50kg raw material, and offered that we will make the 15kg for the price of raw material through a new route  in less than three months time. You pay us only after we deliver 15 kg material. The customer didn’t want to take a chance with their timeline as they didn’t work with us before but requested us to develop the chemistry. In 7 weeks time, we developed a very simple four step route for their advanced intermediate and made 50g. We used very inexpensive and readily available starting material. Our route gave three solid intermediates and completely eliminated chromatographic purifications.

 

One of my former colleague introduced an academic group in midwest and brought us a medchem project requiring synthesis of 65 challenging polyene compounds on 100mg scale. We designed synthetic routes and successfully prepared 60 compounds in a 15 month time.  

UNQUOTE…………

 

The man behind Seeni labs is Dr.Sreenivasa  Reddy Mundla

Sreenivasa Reddy

Dr. Sreenivasa Reddy Mundla

Managing Director at Sreeni Labs Private Limited

Sreeni Labs Private Limited

Road No:12, Plot No:24,25,26

  • IDA, Nacharam
    Hyderabad, 500076
    Telangana State, India

Links

LINKEDIN https://in.linkedin.com/in/sreenivasa-reddy-10b5876

FACEBOOK https://www.facebook.com/sreenivasa.mundla

RESEARCHGATE https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Sreenivasa_Mundla/info

EMAIL mundlasr@hotmail.com,  Info@sreenilabs.com, Sreeni@sreenilabs.com

Dr. Sreenivasa Mundla Reddy

Dr. M. Sreenivasa Reddy obtained Ph.D from University of Hyderabad under the direction Prof Professor Goverdhan Mehta in 1992. From 1992-1994, he was a post doctoral fellow at University of Wisconsin in Professor Jame Cook’s lab. From 1994 to 2000,  worked at Chemical process R&D at Procter & Gamble Pharmaceuticals (P&G). From 2001 to 2007 worked at Global Chemical Process R&D at Eli Lilly and Company in Indianapolis. 

In 2007  resigned to his  job and founded Sreeni Labs based in Hyderabad, Telangana, India  and started working with various global customers and solving various challenging synthesis problems. 
The main strength of Sreeni Labs is in the design, development of a novel chemical route and its development into a robust process followed by production of quality product from 100 grams to 100’s of kg scale.
 

They have helped number of customers by successfully developing highly economical simple chemistry routes to number of products that were made by Suzuki coupling. they are able to shorten the route by drastically reducing number of steps, avoiding use of palladium & expensive ligands. they always use readily available or easy to prepare starting materials in their design of synthetic routes.

Sreeni Labs is Looking for any potential opportunities where people need development of cost effective scalable routes followed by quick scale up to produce quality products in the pharmaceutical & specialty chemicals area. They have flexible business model that will be in sink with customers. One can test their abilities & capabilities by giving PO based projects

Experience

Founder & Managing Director

Sreeni Labs Private Limited

August 2007 – Present (8 years 11 months)

Sreeni Labs Profile

Sreeni Labs Profile

View On SlideShare

Principal Research Scientist

Eli Lilly and Company

March 2001 – August 2007 (6 years 6 months)

Senior Research Scientist

Procter & Gamble

July 1994 – February 2001 (6 years 8 months)

Education

University of Hyderabad

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), 
1986 – 1992

 

PUBLICATIONS

Article: Expansion of First-in-Class Drug Candidates That Sequester Toxic All-Trans-Retinal and Prevent Light-Induced Retinal Degeneration

Jianye Zhang · Zhiqian Dong · Sreenivasa Reddy Mundla · X Eric Hu · William Seibel ·Ruben Papoian · Krzysztof Palczewski · Marcin Golczak

Article: ChemInform Abstract: Regioselective Synthesis of 4Halo ortho-Dinitrobenzene Derivative

Sreenivasa Mundla

Aug 2010 · ChemInform

Article: Optimization of a Dihydropyrrolopyrazole Series of Transforming Growth Factor-β Type I Receptor Kinase Domain Inhibitors: Discovery of an Orally Bioavailable Transforming Growth Factor-β Receptor Type I Inhibitor as Antitumor Agent

Hong-yu Li · William T. McMillen · Charles R. Heap · Denis J. McCann · Lei Yan · Robert M. Campbell · Sreenivasa R. Mundla · Chi-Hsin R. King · Elizabeth A. Dierks · Bryan D. Anderson · Karen S. Britt · Karen L. Huss

Apr 2008 · Journal of Medicinal Chemistry

Article: ChemInform Abstract: A Concise Synthesis of Quinazolinone TGF-β RI Inhibitor Through One-Pot Three-Component Suzuki—Miyaura/Etherification and Imidate—Amide Rearrangement Reactions

Hong-yu Li · Yan Wang · William T. McMillen · Arindam Chatterjee · John E. Toth ·Sreenivasa R. Mundla · Matthew Voss · Robert D. Boyer · J. Scott Sawyer

Feb 2008 · ChemInform

Article: ChemInform Abstract: A Concise Synthesis of Quinazolinone TGF-β RI Inhibitor Through One-Pot Three-Component Suzuki—Miyaura/Etherification and Imidate—Amide Rearrangement Reactions

Hong-yu Li · Yan Wang · William T. McMillen · Arindam Chatterjee · John E. Toth ·Sreenivasa R. Mundla · Matthew Voss · Robert D. Boyer · J. Scott Sawyer

Nov 2007 · Tetrahedron

Article: Dihydropyrrolopyrazole Transforming Growth Factor-β Type I Receptor Kinase Domain Inhibitors: A Novel Benzimidazole Series with Selectivity versus Transforming Growth Factor-β Type II Receptor Kinase and Mixed Lineage Kinase-7

Hong-yu Li · Yan Wang · Charles R Heap · Chi-Hsin R King · Sreenivasa R Mundla · Matthew Voss · David K Clawson · Lei Yan · Robert M Campbell · Bryan D Anderson · Jill R Wagner ·Karen Britt · Ku X Lu · William T McMillen · Jonathan M Yingling

Apr 2006 · Journal of Medicinal Chemistry

Read full-textSource

Article: Studies on the Rh and Ir mediated tandem Pauson–Khand reaction. A new entry into the dicyclopenta[ a, d]cyclooctene ring system

Hui Cao · Sreenivasa R. Mundla · James M. Cook

Aug 2003 · Tetrahedron Letters

Article: ChemInform Abstract: A New Method for the Synthesis of 2,6-Dinitro and 2Halo6-nitrostyrenes

Sreenivasa R. Mundla

Nov 2000 · ChemInform

Article: ChemInform Abstract: A Novel Method for the Efficient Synthesis of 2-Arylamino-2-imidazolines

Read at

[LINK]

Patents by Inventor Dr. Sreenivasa Reddy Mundla

  • Patent number: 7872020

    Abstract: The present invention provides crystalline 2-(6-methyl-pyridin-2-yl)-3-[6-amido-quinolin-4-yl)-5,6-dihydro -4H-pyrrolo[1,2-b]pyrazole monohydrate.

    Type: Grant

    Filed: June 29, 2006

    Date of Patent: January 18, 2011

    Assignee: Eli Lilly and Company

    Inventor: Sreenivasa Reddy Mundla

  • Publication number: 20100120854

    Abstract: The present invention provides crystalline 2-(6-methyl-pyridin-2-yl)-3-[6-amido-quinolin-4-yl)-5,6-dihydro-4H-pyrrolo[1,2-b]pyrazole monohydrate.

    Type: Application

    Filed: June 29, 2006

    Publication date: May 13, 2010

    Applicant: ELI LILLY AND COMPANY

    Inventor: Sreenivasa Reddy Mundla

  • Patent number: 6066740

    Abstract: The present invention provides a process for making 2-amino-2-imidazoline, guanidine, and 2-amino-3,4,5,6-tetrahydroyrimidine derivatives by preparing the corresponding activated 2-thio-subsituted-2-derivative in a two-step, one-pot procedure and by further reacting yields this isolated derivative with the appropriate amine or its salts in the presence of a proton source. The present process allows for the preparation of 2-amino-2-imidazolines, quanidines, and 2-amino-3,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidines under reaction conditions that eliminate the need for lengthy, costly, or multiple low yielding steps, and highly toxic reactants. This process allows for improved yields and product purity and provides additional synthetic flexibility.

    Type: Grant

    Filed: November 25, 1997

    Date of Patent: May 23, 2000

    Assignee: The Procter & Gamble Company

    Inventors: Michael Selden Godlewski, Sean Rees Klopfenstein, Sreenivasa Reddy Mundla, William Lee Seibel, Randy Stuart Muth

TGF-β inhibitors

US 7872020 B2

Sreenivasa Reddy Mundla

The present invention provides 2-(6-methyl-pyridin-2-yl)-3-[6-amido-quinolin-4-yl) -5,6-dihydro-4H-pyrrolo[1,2-b]pyrazole monohydrate, i.e., Formula I.

Figure US07872020-20110118-C00002

EXAMPLE 1 Preparation of 2-(6-methyl-pyridin-2-yl)-3-[6-amido-quinolin-4-yl-5,6-dihydro-4H -pyrrolo[1,2-b]pyrazole monohydrate

Figure US07872020-20110118-C00008

Galunisertib

1H NMR (CDCl3): δ=9.0 ppm (d, 4.4 Hz, 1H); 8.23-8.19 ppm (m, 2H); 8.315 ppm (dd, 1.9 Hz, 8.9 Hz, 1H); 7.455 ppm (d, 4.4 Hz, 1H); 7.364 ppm (t, 7.7 Hz, 1H); 7.086 ppm (d, 8.0 Hz, 1H); 6.969 ppm (d, 7.7 Hz, 1H); 6.022 ppm (m, 1H); 5.497 ppm (m, 1H); 4.419 ppm (t, 7.3 Hz, 2H); 2.999 ppm (m, 2H); 2.770 ppm (p, 7.2 Hz, 7.4 Hz, 2H); 2.306 ppm (s, 3H); 1.817 ppm (m, 2H). MS ES+: 370.2; Exact: 369.16

ABOVE MOLECULE IS

https://newdrugapprovals.org/2016/05/04/galunisertib/

Galunisertib

Phase III

LY-2157299

CAS No.700874-72-2

 

 

READ MY PRESENTATION ON

Accelerating Generic Approvals, see how you can accelerate your drug development programme

Accelerating Generic Approvals by Dr Anthony Crasto

KEYWORDS   Sreenivasa Mundla Reddy, Managing Director, Sreeni Labs Private Limited, Hyderabad, Telangana, India,  new, economical, scalable routes, early clinical drug development stages, Custom synthesis, custom manufacturing, drug discovery, PHASE 1, PHASE 2, PHASE 3,  API, drugs, medicines

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TAK 243

 phase 1, Uncategorized  Comments Off on TAK 243
Jul 052016
 

img

STR1

TAK-243, AOB 87172, MLN-7243

CAS 1450833-55-2
Chemical Formula: C19H20F3N5O5S2
Molecular Weight: 519.5142

Sulfamic acid, [(1R,​2R,​3S,​4R)​-​2,​3-​dihydroxy-​4-​[[2-​[3-​[(trifluoromethyl)​thio]​phenyl]​pyrazolo[1,​5-​a]​pyrimidin-​7-​yl]​amino]​cyclopentyl]​methyl ester

((lR,2R,3S,4R)-2,3-dihydroxy-4-(2-(3-(trifluoromethylthio)phenyl)pyrazolo[l ,5-a]pyrimidin-7-ylamino)cyclopentyl)methyl sulfamate

methyl ((1S,2R,3S,4R)-2,3-dihydroxy-4-((2-(3-((trifluoromethyl)thio)phenyl)pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-7-yl)amino)cyclopentyl)sulfamate

Phase I

Millennium Pharmaceuticals, Inc. INNOVATOR

Roushan AFROZE, Indu T. Bharathan,Jeffrey P. CIAVARRI, Paul E. Fleming,Jeffrey L. Gaulin, Mario Girard, Steven P. Langston, Francois R. SOUCY, Tzu-Tshin WONG, Yingchun Ye,

A UAE inhibitor potentially for the treatment of solid tumors.

TAK-243, also known as MLN7243 and AOB87172, is a small molecule inhibitor of ubiquitin-activating enzyme (UAE), with potential antineoplastic activity. UAE inhibitor MLN7243 binds to and inhibits UAE, which prevents both protein ubiquitination and subsequent protein degradation by the proteasome. This results in an excess of proteins in the cells and may lead to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated apoptosis. This inhibits tumor cell proliferation and survival. UAE, also called ubiquitin E1 enzyme (UBA1; E1), is more active in cancer cells than in normal, healthy cells.

Research Code TAK-243; MLN-7243, TAK-243; TAK 243; TAK243; MLN7243; MLN-7243; MLN 7243; AOB87172; AOB-87172; AOB 87172.

CAS No. 1450833-55-2(MLN 7243)

  • Originator Millennium
  • Developer Takeda Oncology
  • Class Antineoplastics
  • Mechanism of Action Ubiquitin-protein ligase inhibitors
  • Phase I Solid tumours

Most Recent Events

  • 01 Feb 2014 Phase-I clinical trials in Solid tumours (late-stage disease, second-line therapy or greater) in USA (IV)
  • 18 Dec 2013 Preclinical trials in Solid tumours in USA (IV)
  • 18 Dec 2013 Millennium plans a phase I trial for Solid tumours (late-stage disease, second-line therapy or greater) in USA (NCT02045095)

 

 

Cancer is the second most common cause of death in the U.S. and accounts for one of every eight deaths globally (American Cancer Society, Cancer Facts and Figures, 2014). The American Cancer Society expects that in 2014 at least 1,665,540 new cancer cases will be diagnosed in the US and 585,720 Americans are expected to die of cancer, almost 1 ,600 people per day. Currently available paradigms for treating solid tumors may include systemic treatment such as chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, use of targeted agents and biological agents, either as single agents or in combination. These treatments can be delivered in combination with localized treatments such as surgery or radiotherapy. These anti-cancer paradigms can be use in the curative setting as adjuvant or neo-adjuvant treatments or in the metastatic setting as palliative case for prolonged survival and to help manage symptoms and side-effects. In hematological cancers, stem cell transplants may also be an option in certain cancers as well as chemotherapy and/or radiation. Although medical advances have improved cancer survival rates, there remains a continuing need for new and more effective treatments.

Ubiquitin is a small 76-amino acid protein that is the founding member of a family of posttranslational modifiers known as the ubiquitin-like proteins (Ubls). Ubls play key roles in controlling many biological processes including cell division, cell signaling and the immune response. There are 8 known human Ubl activating enzymes (known as Els) (Schulman, B.A., and J.W. Harper, 2009, Ubiquitin-like protein activation by El enzymes: the apex for downstream signalling pathways, Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol 10:319-331). Ubiquitin and other Ubls are activated by a specific El enzyme which catalyzes the formation of an acyl-adenylate intermediate with the C-terminal glycine of the Ubl. The activated Ubl molecule is then transferred to the catalytic cysteine residue within the El enzyme through formation of a thioester bond intermediate. The El -Ubl intermediate and an E2 enzyme interact, resulting in a thioester exchange wherein the Ubl is transferred from the El to active site cysteine on the E2. The Ubl is then conjugated, i.e. transferred, to the target protein, either directly or in conjunction with an E3 ligase enzyme, through isopeptide bond formation with the amino group of a lysine side chain in the target protein. Eukaryotic cells possess ~35 ubiquitin E2 enzymes and >500 ubiquitin E3 enzymes. The E3 enzymes are the specificity factors of the ubiquitin pathway which mediate the selective targeting of specific cellular substrate proteins (Deshaies, R.J., and C.A. Joazeiro, 2009, RING domain E3 ubiquitin ligases, Annu Rev Biochem 78:399-434; Lipkowitz, S., and A.M. Weissman, 2011, RTNGs of good and evil: RING finger ubiquitin ligases at the crossroads of tumour suppression and oncogenesis, Nat Rev Cancer 11 :629-643; Rotin, D., and S. Kumar, 2009, Physiological functions of the HECT family of ubiquitin ligases, Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol 10:398-409).

Two El enzymes have been identified for ubiquitin, UAE (ubiquitin-activating enzyme) and UBA6 (Jin, J., et al., 2007, Dual El activation systems for ubiquitin differentially regulate E2 enzyme charging, Nature 447: 1135-1138). UAE is the El responsible for the majority (>99%) of ubiquitin flux within the cell. UAE is capable of charging each of the approximately -35 E2 enzymes with the exception of Usel, which is the only E2 known to exclusively work with UBA6 (Jin et al., 2007). Inhibition of UAE is sufficient to dramatically impair the great majority of ubiquitin-dependent cellular processes (Ciechanover, A., et al., 1984, Ubiquitin dependence of selective protein degradation demonstrated in the mammalian cell cycle mutant ts85, Cell 37:57-66; Finley, D., A. et al., 1984, Thermolability of ubiquitin-activating enzyme from the mammalian cell cycle mutant ts85, Cell 37:43-55).

The cellular signals generated by ubiquitin are diverse. Ubiquitin can be attached to substrates as a single entity or as polyubiquitin polymers generated through isopeptide linkages between the C-terminus of one ubiquitin and one of the many lysines on a second ubiquitin. These varied modifications are translated into a variety of cellular signals. For example, conjugation of a lysine 48 -linked polyubiquitin chain to a substrate protein is predominantly associated with targeting the protein for removal by the 26S proteasome. A single ubiquitin modification, or monoubiquination, typically affects protein localization and/or function. For example, monoubiquitination modulates the following: 1) the function of Histones 2a and 2b (Chandrasekharan, M.B., et al., 2010, Histone H2B ubiquitination and beyond: Regulation of nucleosome stability, chromatin dynamics and the trans-histone H3 methylation, Epigenetics 5:460-468), 2) controls the nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of PTEN (Trotman, L,C, et al., 2007, 3) ubiquitination regulates PTEN nuclear import and tumor suppression, Cell 128: 141-156), 4) drives localization of the FANCD2 protein to sites of DNA damage (Gregory, R.C., et al., 2003, Regulation of the Fanconi anemia pathway by monoubiquitination, Semin Cancer Biol 13:77-82) and 5) promotes the internalization and endosomal/lysosomal turnover of some cell surface receptors, like EGFR (Mosesson, Y., and Y. Yarden, 2006, Monoubiquitylation: a recurrent theme in membrane proteintransport. Isr Med Assoc J 8:233-237). Other forms of polyubiquitination chains occur on lysine positions 11, 29 and 63, impacting various cellular roles including cell cycle, DNA repair and autophagy (Behrends, C, and J.W. Harper, 2011, Constructing and decoding unconventional ubiquitin chains, Nat Struct Mol Biol 18:520-528; Bennett, E.J., and J.W. Harper, 2008, DNA damage: ubiquitin marks the spot, Nat Struct Mol Biol 15:20-22; Komander, D., 2009, The emerging complexity of protein ubiquitination, Biochem Soc Trans 37:937-953).

UAE-initiated ubiquitin conjugation plays an important role in protein homeostasis, cell surface receptor trafficking, transcription factor turnover and cell cycle progression. Many of these processes are important for cancer cell survival and it is believed that tumor cells may have increased sensitivity to UAE inhibition as a result of their rapid growth rate, increased metabolic demands and oncogene fueled protein stress. Preclinical studies with PYZD-4409, a UAE inhibitor, demonstrated this compound induced cell death in both leukemia and myeloma cell lines and induced anti-tumor activity in a mouse acute myeloid leukemia (AML model). (Xu, W.G., et al., 2010, The ubiquitin-activating enzyme El as a therapeutic target for the treatment of leukemia and multipie myeloma, Blood, 115:2251-59). Thus, UAE represents a protein homeostasis target opportunity for the treatment of cancer.

 

 

Abstract A164: The small molecule UAE inhibitor TAK-243 (MLN7243) prevents DNA damage repair and reduces cell viability/tumor growth when combined with radiation, carboplatin and docetaxel

Michael A. Milhollen, Judi Shi, Tary Traore, Jessica Huck, Darshan Sappal, Jennifer Duffy, Eric Lightcap, Yuko Ishii, Jeff Ciavarri, Paul Fleming, Neil Bence, Marc L. Hyer
Abstracts: AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference: Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics; November 5-9, 2015; Boston, MA

Abstract

Clinical results of VELCADE® (bortezomib) For Injection have prompted evaluation of other enzymes within the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) as druggable targets for human cancer. We have identified a first in class investigational drug, TAK-243 (MLN7243), which targets the ubiquitin activating enzyme, UAE (UBA1), an essential cellular enzyme responsible for activating > 99% of all cellular ubiquitin. Ubiquitin is involved in multiple cellular processes including ubiquitin-dependent protein turnover, cell cycle progression, regulation of apoptosis, protein localization and response to DNA damage. Experiments combining targeted siRNA knockdown with TAK-243 identified DNA damage repair genes necessary for UAE inhibitor-induced cell death. A more focused approach revealed TAK-243 treatment blocked essential monoubiquitination events within the Translesion synthesis (TLS), Fanconi Anemia (FA) and Homologous recombination (HR) pathways. Inhibition of UAE prevented mono-ubiquitin signaling of key mediators within these pathways, including PCNA and FANCD2, by blocking formation of their specific E2-ubiquitin thioesters. In vitro cell-based assays combining TAK-243 with ultraviolet (UV) and radiation, both known to induce DNA damage, yielded inhibition of cell growth and enhanced DNA damage as observed through colony formation assays and Comet assay detection, respectively. Xenograft tumor bearing mice were treated with carboplatin or docetaxel, combined with TAK-243, to evaluate combination benefits in vivo. Synergistic and additive anti-tumor combination benefits were observed in animals treated with TAK-243 + carboplatin and TAK-243 + docetaxel. These important mechanistic in vitro and in vivo studies indicate the dependency of ubiquitination signaling in DNA damage repair and provide a mechanistic rationale for combining radiation, carboplatin or docetaxel with TAK-243 in the clinical setting. Currently, TAK-243 is being evaluated in a solid tumor phase I clinical trial evaluating safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and anti-tumor activity (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02045095).

Citation Format: Michael A. Milhollen, Judi Shi, Tary Traore, Jessica Huck, Darshan Sappal, Jennifer Duffy, Eric Lightcap, Yuko Ishii, Jeff Ciavarri, Paul Fleming, Neil Bence, Marc L. Hyer. The small molecule UAE inhibitor TAK-243 (MLN7243) prevents DNA damage repair and reduces cell viability/tumor growth when combined with radiation, carboplatin and docetaxel. [abstract]. In: Proceedings of the AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference: Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics; 2015 Nov 5-9; Boston, MA. Philadelphia (PA): AACR; Mol Cancer Ther 2015;14(12 Suppl 2):Abstract nr A164.

 

PATENT

WO 2013123169

https://www.google.com/patents/WO2013123169A1?cl=en

 

Scheme 1 : General route for 2-substituted ((1R,2R,3S,4R)-2,3-dihydroxy-4- (pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-7-ylamino)cyclopentyl)methyl sulfamates

Figure imgf000055_0001

A genera! route for the synthesis of compounds represented by structure iv wherein Z is an optionally substituted fused or non-fused aryl or heteroaryl ring is outlined above in Scheme 1. Compound i (obtained by coupling an appropriately protected cyclopentylamine or salt thereof with 2-bromo-7-chloropyrazolo[1 ,5-a]pyrimidine in the presence of a suitable base as described below in the procedure of Examples 1a and 1b) is transformed to a compound of formula iii by coupling with a metal substituted compound Z-M via a palladium catalyzed reaction. A compound of formula iii can also be obtained by first transforming i to a metal substituted compound of formula ii using suitable boron or tin containing reagents, and then coupling with a halogen substituted compound Z-X via a palladium catalyzed reaction. Compounds of formula iv are then obtained by reaction with an appropriate sulfamating reagent (for example chlorosulfonamide or see Armitage, I. et. al. U.S. Patent Application US2009/0036678, and Armitage, I. et. al. Org. Lett., 2012, 14 (10), 2626-2629) followed by appropriate deprotection conditions.

Scheme 2: General route for 5-halogen substituted, 2 -substituted ((1R,2R,3S,4R)- 2,3-dihydroxy-4-(pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-7-ylamino)cyclopentyl)methyl sulfamates

Figure imgf000056_0001
Figure imgf000056_0002

A general route for the synthesis of compounds represented by structure ix wherein Z is an optionally substituted fused or non-fused aryl or heteroaryl ring and X is a halogen is outlined above in Scheme 2. Cyclization of amino-pyrazole v with a suitable diester and an appropriate base at an elevated temperature is followed by reaction with an appropriate halogenating reagent such as POCI3 at an elevated temperature to give compounds of formula vii. Compounds of formula viii are then obtained by reaction with an appropriately protected cyc!opentylamine or a salt thereof in the presence of a suitable base. Sulfamation and deprotection following Method 1 as described previously provides compounds of formula ix.

Scheme 3: General route for 5-alkyl substituted, 2-substituted ((1R,2R,3S,4R)-2,3- dihydroxy-4-(pyrazolo[1 ,5-a]pyrimidin-7-ylamino)cyclopentyl)methyl sulfamates

Figure imgf000057_0001

SIMILAR COMPD

Example 17. Synthesis of (s.e.)-{(1 ,2R,3S,4R)-4-[(3,6-dichloro-2-{3- [(trifluoromethyl)sulfanyl]phenyl}pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-7-yl)amino]-2,3- dihydroxycyclopentyl}methyl sulfamate (1-124) and (s.e.)-{(1 ,2R,3S,4R)-4-[(6-chloro-2-{3- [(trifluoromethyl)sulfanyl]phenyl}pyrazolo[1,5^]pyrimidin-7-y[)arnino]-2,3- dihydroxycyclopentyl}methyl sulfamate 0-125).

Figure imgf000124_0001
                                                                             SIMILAR NOT SAME

Step 1. To a vial containing s.e {(1 ,2 ,3S,4 )-2,3-dihydroxy-4-t(2-{3- [(t rif I u orometh y l)sulf a nyl] phen l}p^

sulfamate (0.82 g, 0.0015 mol) and cooled to 0 °C is added N-chlorosuccinimide (126 mg, 0.000943 mol) as a solution in 12 mL of N,N-dimethy)formamide. The reaction mixture is stirred overnight with warming to rt. Saturated sodium bicarbonate solution is added and the reaction mixture is extracted with ethyl acetate, washed with brine, dried over sodium sulfate and concentrated in vacuo. The crude material is first purified by column chromatography (eluent: methanol/methylene chloride) and then purified by HPLC to afford both the dichloro (LCMS: (FA) +1 588) and mono chloro (LCMS: (FA) M+1 554) titlecompounds.

 

PATENT

WO 2016069393

UAE inhibitors are disclosed in patent application publications WO2013/123169 and US 2014/0088096. In one embodiment, the UAE inhibitor is a compound having the following structure (Compound 1):


(Compound 1);

or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof. The Compound 1 is named ((lR,2R,3S,4R)-2,3-dihydroxy-4-(2-(3-(trifluoromethylthio)phenyl)pyrazolo[l ,5-a]pyrimidin-7-ylamino)cyclopentyl)methyl sulfamate.

process for making Compound 1 :


Compound 1;

or pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, comprising the steps of:

a) contacting Compound 9 or a salt, solvate or hydrate thereof with 2,2-dimethyl-l,3-dioxane-4,6-dione (Meldrum’s acid):


Compound 9

under coupling conditions to provide compound 8 or a salt, solvate or hydrate thereof:


Compound 8

b) subjecting compound 8 or a salt, solvate or hydrate thereof to cyclization conditions to provide compound 7 or a salt, solvate or hydrate thereof


Compound 7

c) contacting Compound 7 or a salt, solvate or hydrate thereof with benzotriazole under chlorination displacement conditions to provide Compound 5 or a salt, complex, solvate or hydratei thereof


; Compound 5

d) contacting Compound 5 or a salt, complex, solvate or hydrate thereof with Compound 6 or a solvate or hydrate thereof:


; Compound 6

under displacement reaction conditions to provide Compound 3 or a salt, solvate or hydrate thereof

solvate or hydrate thereof with Compound


Cl ; Compound 4

under sulfamoylating reaction conditions to provide Compound 2 or a salt, solvate or hydrate thereof


; Compound 2

f) contacting Compound 2 or a salt, solvate or hydrate thereof with an acid under sulfamoylation conditions to provide Compound 1 or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof

COMPD1

 

Example 1: Synthesis of S-iB-Ktrifluoromethyltsulfanyllphenyll-lH-pyrazol-S-amine

Step A: 3-((trifluoromethyl)thio)benzoate

To dimethylcarbonate (68 mL) was added 3-((trifluoromethyl)thio)benzoic acid (100 g, Beta Pharma Scientific) and a catalytic amount of sulfuric acid (2.4 mL). The mixture was then heated to 90°C for 5h. The reaction was then cooled to room temperature and quenched with sodium bicarbonate (1.0 L). To the aqueous layer was with ethyl acetate (1.0 L). The phases were separated and this process was repeated with ethyl acetate (1.0 L). The organic layers were combined and concentrated with a rotovap to give a light orange oil. The methyl 3-((trifluoromethyl)thio)benzoate (105g, 99%) was taken on crude to the next reaction. Ή NMR (300 MHz, CHLOROFORM-^ δ ppm 3.99 (s, 3 H) 7.49 – 7.58 (m, 1 H) 7.85 (d, J=l.62 Hz, 1 H) 8.17 (dt, J=7.69, 1.43 Hz, 1 H) 8.32 – 8.44 (m, 1 H).

Step B: 3-oxo-3-(3-((trifluoromcthvnthio)phcnyl>proDaneiiitrilc

Methyl 3-((trifluoromethyl)thio)benzoate (100.0 g) in tetrahydrofuran (1.0 L) was added acetonitrile (44.2 mL, 847 rnmol) and 1M (in THF) potassium tert-butoxide (95.01 g). The reaction was complete in 10 min by HPLC analysis. The reaction was quenched with 1M HC1 (1.0 L) and then extracted with three times with (1.0 L) of ethyl acetate. The organic layers with 3-oxo-3-(3-((trifluoromethyl)thio)phenyl)propanenitrile were then concentrated to dryness. This material (lOO.Og, 96.3%) was taken on crude with further purification. Ή NMR (300 MHz, CHLOROFORM-rf) δ ppm 4.12 (s, 2 H) 7.51 – 7.75 (m, 1 H) 7.89 – 8.01 (m, 1 H) 8.01 – 8.10 (m, 1 H) 8.20 (s, 1 H)

Step C: 3-}3-htrifliioromethv sulfan llphenyl}-lH-pyrazol-5-amine

[0152] To 3-oxo-3-{3-[(trifluoromethyl)sulfanyl]phenyl}propanenitrile (100.0 g,) in ethanol (1000.0 mL) was added hydrazine hydrate (59.52 mL). The reaction was heated to 100°C for lh at which point HPLC analysis showed the reaction was complete. The reaction was concentrated to dryness on a rotovap to give a brown oil. The oil was taken up in ethyl acetate (1.0 L) and extracted with water (1.0 L). The phases were separated and the organic phase was concentrated. Upon concentration 3-{3-[(trifluoromethyl)sulfanyl]phenyl}-lH-pyrazol-5-amine was obtained (80.8 g; Yield = 76.4%) . !H NMR (300 MHz, CHLOROFORM-^ δ ppm 5.95 (s, 1 H) 6.73 (br s, 1 H) 7.13 – 7.34 (m, 2 H) 7.42 – 7.74 (m, 3 H) 7.85 (s, 1 H).

Example 2: f R.2R.3St4RV2.3-dihvdroxy-4-ff2-r3- ((trifluoromethylHhio)phenvnpyrazolo[l,5-alpyrimidin-7-yl¼mino)cvclopentyl)metliyl sulfamate

Step 1: f2.2-dimethyl-5-ffl3-(3-((triiluoromethvnthio phenvn-lH-pyrazol-5- amino methyleBC>-1.3-dioxane-4,6-dione)

[0155] To trimethoxy orthoformate (2.0 L), at 20°C and under a blanket of nitrogen, was added 2,2-dimethyl-l,3-dioxane-4,6-dione (361.35 g). The resulting white suspension went clear within minutes and was heated to 85°C over 15 minutes. The reaction was held at 85°C for 120 minutes. While the reaction was heated and stirred another solution of 3-(3-((trifluoromethyl)thio)pheny])-lH-pyrazol-5-amine (500.0 g) was made. To a 4L RBF was added 3-(3-((trifluoromethyl)thio)phenyl)-lH-pyrazol-5-amine (500.0 g) and then trimethoxy orthoformate (1.4 L) added into this solid. This solution was mixed to dissolve the solids and resulted a dark brown solution. The solution of 3-(3-((trifluoromethyl)thio)phenyl)-lH-pyrazol-5-amine (-1.8L in trimethoxy orthoformate) was added to the reactor over 30 minutes while maintaining the reaction temperature at 85°C. The reaction was then stirred for 20 minutes with white solids forming in the solution. After 20 minutes the reaction was sampled and the UPLC showed the complete conversion of 3-(3-((trifluoromethyl)thio)phenyl)-lH-pyrazol-5 -amine to 2,2-dimethyl-5-(((3-(3-((trifluoromethyl)thio)phenyl)-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)amino)methylene)-l ,3-dioxane-4,6-dione. The reaction was cooled to 20 °C over 20 minutes and maintained at that temperature for 20 additional minutes. At this point, a thick white slurry had formed and the reaction was filtered using a Nutche Filter over 15 minutes. The reactor was washed with 1L of ethyl acetate and this solution was then mixed with the filter cake and removed by filtration. The cake was dried for -40 minutes on the filter and then transferred to a vacuum oven and heated at 40°C under full vacuum overnight (16 hours). The reaction was then analyzed by FfPLC and NMR to give 2,2-dimethyl-5-(((3-(3 -((trifluoromethyl)thio)phenyi lH-pyrazol-5-yl)amino)methylene)- 1 ,3-dioxane-4,6-dione (635.3 g, 79%) XH NMR (300 MHz, DMSO-cfe) δ ppm 1.68 (s, 6 H) 7.05 (d, J=2.05 Hz, 1 H) 7.64 -7.77 (m, 2 H) 7.77 – 8.03 (m, 1 H) 8.12 (s, 1 H) 8.72 (d, J=14.36 Hz, 1 H) 1 1.35 (d, J=14.66 Hz, 1 H) 13.47 (s, 1 H).

[0156] Step 2: 2-( 3-f(trifluoromethyl)thio phenyl)pyrazoIo [1,5-al pyrimidin-7-ol

[0157] A solution of 2,2-dimethyl-5-(((3-(3-((trifluoromethyl)thio)phenyl)-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)amino)methylene)-l,3-dioxane-4,6-dione (615.00 g) in 1,2-dichIorobenzene (6.3 L) was stirred at ambient temperature for 10 minutes. The solution was then heated to 150°C over 75 minutes. The reaction was maintained at this temperature for 16 hours. An sample was taken after 16 hours and the UPLC analysis showed the complete conversion of 2,2-dimethyl-5-(((3-(3-((trifluoromethyl)thio)phenyl)-lH-pyrazol-5-yI)amino)methylene)-l,3-dioxane-4,6-dione to 2-(3- ((trifluoromethyl)tmo)phenyl)pyrazolo[l,5-a]pyrimidin-7-ol. The reaction was cooled to 20°C over 130 minutes. At this point, a thick white slurry had formed and the reaction was filtered using a Nutche Filter over 15 minutes. The reactor was washed with 1.8 L of acetonitrile and this solution was then mixed with the filter cake and then the solvent was removed by filtration. The cake was dried for ~40 minutes on the filter and then transferred to a vacuum oven and heated at 40°C under full vacuum overnight (16 hours). The reaction was then analyzed by HPLC and NMR to give 2-(3-((trifluoromethyl)thio)phenyl)pyrazolo[l,5-a]pyrimidin-7-ol (331.2 g, 72%) Ή NMR (300 MHz, METHANOL-^) δ ppm 6.55 (d, J=7.33 Hz, 1 H) 7.59 (s, 1 H) 8.40 – 8.52 (m, 1 H) 8.53 – 8.64 (m, 1 H) 8.69 (d, J=7.62 Hz, 1 H) 9.01 (dt, J=7.77, 1.39 Hz, 1 H) 9.12 (s, 1 H) 13.34 (s, 1 H).

[0158] Step 3: l-(2-(3-(f trffluoromethvmhiotohenvnpyrazolo n.5-al pyrimidin-7-vn-lH-benzofdiri.2.31triazole: triethylamine: hydrochloride complex (1:1.25:1.25 molesimolestmolest

[0159] To a solution of 2-(3-((trifluoromethyl)thio)phenyl)pyrazolo[l,5-a]pyrimidin-7-ol (30.00 g), benzotriazole (287.02 g) in acetonitrile (3000 mL) and triethylamine (403.00 mL) at 0°C, was added phosphoryl chloride (108 mL) slowly under a blanket of nitrogen, maintaining < 10°C. The reaction was then warmed to 80°C over 45 minutes and stirred for 240 minutes. HPLC indicated complete

consumption of starting material. To the reaction mixture was added acetonitrile (3000 mL) while maintaining the temperature at 80°C. The reaction was then cooled to 20°C over 80 minutes. The reaction was then stirred at ambient temperature for 14 hours. At this point, a thick slurry had formed and the reaction was filtered using a Nutche filter over 15 minutes. The reactor was washed twice with 900 mL of acetonitrile and this solution was then mixed with the filter cake and then the solvent was removed by filtration. The cake was dried for -40 minutes on the filter and then transferred to a vacuum oven and heated at 40°C under full vacuum overnight (16h). The reaction was then analyzed by HPLC and NMR to give l-(2-(3-((trifluorometJiyl)thio)phe

triethylamine: hydrochloride complex (1:1.25:1.25 moles:moles:moles) (438.1 g, 83%). ¾ NMR (300 MHz, DMSO-</6) δ ppm 1.19 (t, J=7.33 Hz, 12 H) 3.07 (qd, J=7.28, 4.84 Hz, 8 H) 7.60 – 7.78 (m, 6 H) 7.80 – 7.87 (m, 1 H) 8.15 (dt, J=7.99, 1.28 Hz, 1 H) 8.24 (s, 1 H) 8.33 (dt, J=8.14, 0.92 Hz, 1 H) 8.85 (d, J=4.69 Hz, 1 H).

[0160] Step 4: ff3aR4R.6R.6aS 2.2-dimethyl-6-ff2-f3~mrifluoromethyl)thio)phenvnpyrazoloil.5-alD\timidin-7-yl¼mino)tctralivdro-3aH-cvcLoDentaldlll,31dioxol-4-vnincthanol

[0161] To the reactor was added l-(2 3-((trifluoromethyl)thio)phenyl)pyrazolo[l,5-a]pyrimidin-7-yl)-lH-benzo[d][l,2,3]triazole: triethylamine: hydrochloride complex (1 :1.25: 1.25 moles :moles:moles) (430.0 g) and ((3aR,4R,6R,6aS)-6-amino-2,2-dimethyltetrahydro-3aH-cyclopenta[d][l,3]dioxol-4-yl)methanol hydrochloride (209.0 g) and then triethylamine (2103 mL) was added. The reaction was then heated to 80°C, under a blanket of nitrogen. After 360 minutes, HPLC analysis indicated that the reaction mixture contained <1% starting material and the reaction was cooled to 20°C over 60 minutes. To the reaction was added ethyl acetate (3.5 L) and water (3.5 L). After stirring for 10 minutes the phases were separated and the aqueous layer was back extracted with ethyl acetate (3.5 L). The organic layers were combined and concentrated to form a dark, brown oil. Acetonitrile (4.5 L) was added and the solution was concentrated to dryness to give an orange solid. The solids was transferred back to the reaction with water (4.3 L), heated to 50°C, and stirred for 20 minutes. White solids formed in this hot solution and were isolated by filtration using a Nutche Filter over 15 minutes. The solids were dried under vacuum for 15 minutes on the filter and then dissolved in acetonitrile (4.0 L) at 0°C. The solution was stirred for 1 minutes. The solution was then filtered through a fritted funnel to remove the hydrolysis solid by product and the solution was concentrated to dryness. The solids were dried in a vacuum oven at full vacuum overnight (40°C, 16 hours). The reaction was then analyzed by HPLC and NMR to give ((3aR,4R,6R,6aS)-2,2-dimethyl-6-((2-(3 -((trifluoromethyl)thio)phenyl)pyrazolo[ 1 ,5 -a]pyrimidin-7-yl)amino)tetrahydro-3aH-cyclopenta[d][l,3]dioxol-4-yl)methanoI (349.2 g, 88%). Ή NMR (300 MHz, DMSO-<¾) δ ppm 1.25 (s, 3 H) 1.47 (s, 3 H) 1.76 – 1.90 (m, 1 H) 2.25 (br d, J-3.22 Hz, 1 H) 2.33 – 2.47 (m, 1 H) 3.46 – 3.67 (m, 2 H) 4.08 (br d, J=5.57 Hz, 1 H) 4.48 – 4.64 (m, 2 H) 5.19 (t, J=4.40 Hz, 1 H) 6.28 (d, J=5.28 Hz, 1 H) 7.06 (s, 1 H) 7.58 – 7.71 (m, 1 H) 7.72 – 7.80 (m, 1 H) 8.12 – 8.24 (m, 2 H) 8.31 (d, J=7.62 Hz, 1 H) 8.42 (s, 1 H).

[0162] Step 5: ((3aR.4R.6R.6aS 2.2-dimethyl-6-ff2-f3-fftrifluoroinethYmhio)phenvnpyrazolo[1.5-al Dyrimidin-7-vnan] iiio>tetrahvdro-3aH-cvclonen ta [dl [1,31 dioTOl-4-yl )meth yl tert-bntoxycarbonylsulfamate

[0163] ((3aR,4R,6R,6aS)-2,2-dime l-6-((2-(3-((trifluorome

7-yl)amino)tetrahydro-3aH-cyclopenta[d][l,3]dioxol-4-yl)methanol (6.0 g) was dissolved in 2-methyltetrahedrafuran (60.0 mL) and to this solution was added pyridinium p-toluenesulfonate (5.9 g). This formed a precipitated and to this white slurry was added (4-aza-l-azoniabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-l-ylsulfonyl)(tert-butoxycarbonyl)azanide-l,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (1 :1) hydrochloride1 (17.0 g). The mixture was stirred at ambient temperature until the HPLC showed <1% ((3aR,4R,6R,6aS)-2,2-dimethyl-6-((2-(3-((trifluoromethyl)thio)phenyl)pyrazolo[l,5-a]pyrimidin-7-yl)amino)tetrahydro-3aH-cyclopenta[d][l,3]dioxol-4-yl)methanol remaining starting material (-300 minutes). The reaction was quenched with water (60 mL) and the phases were separated. To the organic layer was added acetonitrile (60 mL) and the mixture was concentrated using a rotovap at 50°C to ~60 mL. The mixture was allowed to cool to room temperature and stirred overnight. During this time a white slurry formed. White solids were filtered using a medium fritted filter. The solid was dried in a vacuum oven at full vacuum overnight (40 °C). The reaction was then analyzed by HPLC and NMR to give ((3aR,4R,6R,6aS)-2,2-dimethyl-6-((2-(3-((trifluoromethyI)tM^

cyclopenta[d][l,3]dioxol-4-yl)methyl tert-butoxycarbonylsulfamate (5.03 g, 68%). [H NMR (300 MHz, DMSO- 6) δ ppm 1.26 (s, 3 H) 1.42 (s, 9 H) 1.51 (s, 3 H) 2.33 – 2.48 (m, 2 H) 3.30 (br s, 1 H) 4.06 – 4.21 (m, 1 H) 4.29 (d, J=5.28 Hz, 2 H) 4.52 (dd, J=7.18, 5.13 Hz, 1 H) 4.76 (dd, J=7.18, 4.54 Hz, 1 H) 6.35 (d, J=5.57 Hz, 1 H) 7.08 (s, 1 H) 7.63 – 7.72 (m, 1 H) 7.74 – 7.82 (m, 1 H) 8.01 (d, ^=7. 2 Hz, 1 H) 8.21 (d, J=5.28 Hz, 1 H) 8.31 (dt, J=7.84, 1.36 Hz, 1 H) 8.48 (s, 1 H) 1 1.92 (br s, 1 H)

[0164] Step 6: f R,2R3S.4R)-2J-dihvdroxy-4-((2-(3-fftrifluoromethvDthio^phenvnpyrazolori.5-a]pyrimidin-7-yl)aminokvcl nent\l)methyl sulfamate

[0165] To a solution of ((3aR,4R,6R!6aS)-2,2-dimethyl-6-((2-(3- ((trifluoromethyl)thio)phenyl)pyrazolo[l,5-a]pyrimidin-7-yl)amino)tetrahydro-3aH-cyclopenta[d][l,3]dioxol-4-yl)methyl tert-butoxycarbonylsulfamate (2.0 g) in acetonitrile (11 mL) at 0°C was added phosphoric acid (1 1 mL) while maintaining the temperature below 10°C. This mixture was warmed to ambient temperature and stirred for 4 hours. At this time HPLC analysis showed that <1% ((3aR,4R,6R,6aS)-2,2-dimethyl-6-((2-(3 -((trifluoromethyl)thio)phenyl)pyrazolo[ 1 ,5-a]pyrimidin-7-yl)amino)tetrahydro-3aH-cyclopenta[d][l,3]dioxol-4-yl)methyl tert-butoxycarbonylsulfamate starting material or reaction intermediates remained. To the reaction was added ethyl acetate (1 1 mL) and water (11 mL) and saturated Na2C03 (10 mL) dropwise. After this addition was complete saturated Na2C03 was added until the pH was between 6-7. The phases were separated and to the organic layer was added acetonitrile (30 mL) and the mixture was concentrated on a rotovap to ~16 mL. The mixture was stirred overnight. During this time a white slurry formed. The white solids were filtered using a medium filtted filter. The solid was dried in a vacuum oven at full vacuum overnight (40°C). The reaction was then analyzed by HPLC and NMR to give ((lR,2R,3S,4R)-2,3-dihydroxy-4-((2-(3-((trifluoromethyl)thio)phenyl)pyrazolo[ 1 ,5-a]pyrimidin-7-yl)amino)cyclopentyl)methyl sulfamate (1.5g ,84%). lH NMR (300 MHz, DMSO-c¾) δ ppm 1.44 – 1.61 (m, 1 H) 2.20 – 2.42 (m, 2 H) 3.78 (q, J-4.50 Hz, 1 H) 3.90 – 4.09 (m, 3 H) 4.09 – 4.22 (m, 1 H) 4.80 (d, ^5.28 Hz, 1 H) 5.03 (d, J=5.28 Hz, 1 H) 6.31 (d, J=5.57 Hz, 1 H) 7.05 (s, 1 H) 7.48 (s, 2 H) 7.62 – 7.72 (m, 1 H) 7.77 (d, J=7.92 Hz, 2 H) 8.17 (d, J=5.28 Hz, 1 H) 8.31 (dt, ^7.70, 1.43 Hz, 1 H) 8.47 (s, 1 H).

[0166] Example 3: fflR.2R.3S.4RV2.3-dihvdrosy-4-ff2-f3- ( ( trifluoroniethyl )thio)ph en vDpyrazolo 11,5-a I pyi Lmidin-7-Yl)amino)cvclopcntyl>m ethyl sulfama te

[0167] Step 1: .2-dimethyl-5-ff -(3-frtrifluoromethvnthio)phenvn-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)ainino)methylene -l,3-dioxane-4,6-dione)

[0168] Under a blanket of nitrogen at 20°C, Meldrum’s acid (18.6 Kg) and isopropanol (33 L) were placed in a 100 L glass-lined reactor. Trimethyl orthoformate (15.5 Kg (16.0L)) and isopropanol (11 L) were added and the mixture was heated to 80 °C for 40 min, whereby a small amount of methanol distilled off (<0.5 L). The mixture was stirred for 2 h at 80 °C. in a separate 160 L glass-lined reactor under nitrogen at 20 °C, 3-(3-((trifluoromethyl)thio)phenyl)-lH-pyrazol-5-amine (prepared in the manner described above) was mixed with isopropanol ( 10.9 kg, 42.0 mmol) and heated up to 80 °C within 60 min. The content of the 100 L reactor was transferred into the reaction mixture in the 160 L reactor at 80 °C, which was completed after 3 min. The reaction mixture was stirred for 30 min at 78 °C, the reaction was then cooled to 60 °C. HPLC analysis showed the reaction was 99.56% complete (product%/(product%+starting material0/.). The reaction mixture was cooled to 20 °C within 100 min, then the mixture was stirred for further 100 min at 20 °C. The suspension was then transferred onto a pressure filter. At 1.2 bar nitrogen, the solids were collected on the filter. The filter cake was washed 4 x with ethyl acetate (18 L each time). The wet cake was dried on the filter for 17 h at 20°C using a slight stream of nitrogen/vacuum (200-100 mbar). The wet product (14.7 kg) was further dried at the rotavap for approx. 24 h at 40-50 °C. 11,75 kg of the crude title compound was obtained (68% yield). NMRspectrum was consistent with that described above in Example 2.

[0169] Step 2: 2-(3-fftrifluoromethvnthio)phenYnpyrazolori.S-a1pyrimidin-7-ol

[0170] Under nitrogen at 20 °C, (2,2-dimethyl-5-(((3-(3-((trifluoromethyl)thio)phenyl)-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)amino)methylene)-l ,3-dioxane-4,6-dione) was placed in the reactor. 1 ,2-Dichlorobenzene (117 L) was added. The suspension was heated to 147°C for 90 min to give a solution, then it was stirred at 147°C for 18 h. Before sampling, the reaction was cooled to 60°C. HPLC analysis showed the reaction was 92.28% completion (product%/(product%+starting material%). The mixture was heated up again to 147°C and stirred for further 5 h at this temperature. HPLC analysis showed the reaction was 96.51% complete (product%/(product%+starting material%). The mixture was then stirred for 48 hours at 20°C, then it was heated again to 147°C und stirred at this temperature for 5 h. Before sampling, the reaction was cooled to 60°C. HPLC analysis showed the reaction was 98.47% completion (product%/(product%+starting material%). The mixture was heated up again to 146°C and stirred for further 5 h at this temperature.

Before sampling, the reaction was cooled to 60°C. HPLC analysis showed the reaction was 99.35% complete (product%/(product%+starting material%). The reaction was cooled to 20°C and the suspension was transferred in a pressure filter. The solids were collected on the filter at 1.8-3 bar N2 over a greater than 10 hour period. The filter cake was washed 4 x with acetonitrile (17 L), then it was dried on the filter for 18 h at 20°C/200-100 mbar, using a slight stream of N2. The material was transferred to a 50 L flask and dried on a rotavap at 50-60°C / 24-14 mbar for 2 d. 6.118 kg of the crude title compound was obtained (70% yield). NMR spectrum was consistent with that described above in Example 2.

[0171] Step 3: l-f2-f3- trifluoromethYnthio^phenvnpyrazoIo[1.5-alpyriinidiii-7-vn-lH-benzofdl [1.2.31 triazolc: triethylamine: hydrochloride complex ( 1 :0.21:0.21 moles:moles:moles)

[0172] Under N2 at 20°C, acetonitrile (30 L) was placed in the reactor, 2-(3-((trifluoromethyl)thio)phenyl)pyrazolo[l,5-a]pyrimidin-7-ol (6.00 kg) and lH-benzotriazol (5.83 kg) was added. A further portion of acetonitrile (30 L) was added, then the mixture was stirred at 20°C. Stirring proceeded over night. Triethylamine (8.16 L) was added at 20°C over 6 min. The yellow suspension was heated up to 45°C for 40 min. While stirring at 150 rpm, phosphoryl chloride (4.562 kg) was slowly added for 45 min. By controlling the addition, the reagent was dropped directly into the mixture to avoid the formation of lumps. The addition was exothermic, a maximum temperature of 53°C was observed. The brown suspension was heated up to 80°C over 1 h, then the reaction mixture was stirred for 5 h at this temperature. Acetonitrile (30 L) was added over 20 min keeping the internal temperature between 75-80°C. HPLC analysis showed the reaction was 98.31% completion (product%/(product%+starting material%).The mixture (brown suspension) was further stirred at 80°C for 70 min. HPLC analysis showed the reaction was 99.48% completion (product%/(product%+starting material%). Acetonitrile (61 L) was added over 30 min maintaining the temperature between 75-80°C. The pale brown suspension was stirred at 80°C for 90 min, then it was cooled to 20°C over 2.5 h. The mixture was stirred for 12 h at 20°C. The mixture was transferred in a pressure filter. The filter cake was washed twice with acetonitrile ( 18 L). Both wash steps were done at 3.5-4 bar N2. Each of these filtrations took overnight to go to completion. The filter cake was dried on the filter for 7.5 h. The material was transferred in a 50 L flask and dried at the rotavap at Ta 40-50°C / 50-11 mbar for 3 d to get a dry mass of 99.88% . The yield of l -(2-(3-((trifluoromethyl)t]iio)phenyl)pyrazolo[l ,5-a]pyrimidin-7-yl)-lH-benzo[d][l,2,3]triazole: triethylamine: hydrochloride complex (1 :0.21 :0.21 moles:moles:moles) was 7.948 kg (75%). NMR spectrum was consistent with that described above in Example 2.

[0173] Step 4: 3aR4R.6R,6aS)-2,2-dimethYl-6-f(2-f3-ffMfluoromethvnthio phenvnpyrazolori.5-alDyrimidin-7-yl)amino)tetrahvdro-3aH- vclopenta Idl [1.31 dioxol-4-vDmethanol

[0174] Under N2 in a 160 L glasslined reactor, triethylamine (21%) compound with l -(2-(3-((trifluoromethyl)thio)phenyl)pyrazolo[ 1 ,5 -a] pyrimidin-7-yI) – 1 H-benzo [d] [ 1 ,2,3 Jtriazole (21 %) hydrochloride (7.86 kg) was dissolved in triethylamine (23.3 L) at 20°C. ((3aR,4R,6R,6aS)-6-amino-2,2-dimethyltetrahydro-3aH-cyclopenta[d][l,3]dioxol-4-yl)methanol hydrochloride (4.49 kg) was added, followed by triethylamine (23 L). The reaction mixture was heated up to 80°C over 1 h, and then the mixture was stirred for 8 h at 80°C. The mixture was then cooled to 20°C. HPLC analysis showed the reaction was 99.97% complete (product%/(product%+starting material%). Water (66 L) was then added over 30 min at 20-25°C (exotherm), whereby a brown suspension was obtained. The mixture was concentrated at 60°C, 150-95 mbar, until 42 L solvent was distilled off. The suspension was heated to 50°C, and the solids were collected on a 90 L pressure filter (1.2 bar N2), which took 40 min. During this process, the material on the filter was not actively heated. The remaining solids in the reactor were rinsed with 15 L of the mother liquor. The wet filter cake was transferred back in the reactor. Water (64 L) was added. The mixture was heated up to 50°C over 30 min. The washed solids were collected on the 90 L pressure filter. Remaining mother liquor in the filter cake was pressed off at 1.2 bar N2 for 50 min (50 L mother liquor was used to rinse the reactor). The filter cake was dried on the pressure filter for 13.5 h, applying a slight stream of N2 / vac at 20°C to afford 10.247 kg of crude ((3aR,4R,6R,6aS)-2,2-dimethyl-6-((2-(3-((trifluoromethyl)tWo)phenyl)pyrazolo[l ,5-a]pyrimidin-7-yl)ammo)tetrahydro-3aH-cyclopenta[d][l,3]dioxol-4-yl)methanol. The wet filter cake was isolated. The wet filter cake was loaded into the reactor. Acetonitrile (65 L) was added, followed by activated charcoal (6.59 kg). The mixture was heated to 50°C for 30 min and stirred for 2 h at 50°C. Meanwhile a bed of celite (4.25 kg) had been prepared in the 90 L pressure filter, using acetonitrile (20 L) for conditioning. The bed was heated at 50°C. The black suspension was transferred on the filter and pushed through the Celite plug at 2 bar. The filtrate was transferred to a 200 L stirring tank via a heat resistant tube and a 0.45 μιη inline filter. The operation needed 18 min for completion. For washing, acetonitrile (50 L) which had been warmed up in the reactor to 50°C and transferred over the warmed filter cake and pushed through at 2 bar. Again, the filtrate was transferred in the 200 L stirring tank via a heat resistant tube and a 0.45 μιη inline filter. The operation needed 10 min for completion. The reactor was cleaned to remove attached charcoal (abrasive cleaning, using NaCl /acetone). The filtrate in the stirring tank was transferred in the reactor and concentrated at 50°C / 120 mbar until 63 L were distilled off. While well stirring (300 rpm) and 50°C, Water (1 10 L) was slowly added over 2 h. A pale yellow suspension was formed. The concentrate was cooled to 20°C for 3 h, then stirred at this temperature for 13 h. The solids were collected on a 50 L filter, using 1.2 bar N2 to push the filtrate through. The filter cake was washed twice with water (18 L), then dried on the filter for 24 h at 200-100 mbar, using a slight stream of N2. 4.563 kg of the title compound was obtained 55% yield. NMR spectrum was consistent with that described above in Example 2.

[0175] Step 5: (f3aR,4R,6R,6aS)-2^-dimethyl-6-(f2-f3-fftrifluorQmethvnthio phenvnpyrazolo[1.5- |pyrimidm-7-vnamino)teti ahYclro-3aH-cvclopenta|d||1.3ldioxol-4-yl mcthyl tert-butoxycarbonylsutfamatc

[0176] Under N2 at 20°C, ((3aR,4R,6R,6aS)-2,2-dimethyl-6-((2-(3- ((trifluoromethyl)thio)phenyl)pyrazolo[ 1 , 5 -a]pyrimidin-7-yl)amino)tetrahydro-3 aH-cyclopenta[d][l,3]dioxol-4-yl)methanol (4.019 kg) was placed in a 160 L glasslined reactor, then 2-methyl-tetrahydrofuran (40 L) was added. The mixture was stirred at 150 rpm for 30 min at 20°C, whereby a clear solution was formed. A KF measurement was taken and showed the water content to be 0.036% H20. The solution was stirred over night at 20 °C. The next morning, PPTS (2.2 kg) was loaded into the reactor. At 20°C, (4-aza-l-azoniabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-l-yIsulfonyl)(tert-butoxyc£u-bonyl)azanide-l,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (1:1) hydrochloride (10.2 kg) was added. Stirring of the heterogeneous mixture was started at 130 rpm. The reaction was stirred with 200 rpm for 1 h at 20°C, then with increased speed of 250 rpm for an additional hour. HPLC analysis showed the conversion to be 87.3%. The reaction mass was stirred with 300 rpm for 2 h at 20°C. HPLC analysis showed the conversion to be 95.6%. The reaction mass was stirred with 300 rpm for 2 h at 20°C. HPLC analysis showed the conversion to be 97.7%. NaHC03 3.7% (40 L) was added to the mixture at 20°C and the reaction was stirred at 300 rpm for 10 min. Most of the solids from the reaction mixture went into solution. To dissolve remaining material which was attached at the top of the reactor, the bilayered mixture was stir up shortly by a N2 stream from the bottom. The layers were separated, which was completed after 13 min. The aqueous layer was discharged, the organic layer remained in the reactor. The org. layer was a brown solution, the aqueous layer was colorless and turbid. The pH of aqueous layer was approx. 8 (pH stick). NaHC03 3.7% (40 L) was added to the mixture at 20°C and it was stirred at 300 rpm for 10 min. The layers were separated, which was completed after 27 min. The aqueous layer was discharged, the organic layer remained in the reactor. The organic layer was a brown solution, the aqueous layer was colorless and turbid. The pH of aqueous layer was approx. 8-9 (pH stick) and the pH of organic layer was approx. 8 (pH stick, wet). The product in organic layer was transferred in the feeding tank and stored temporarily (approx. 30 min) at 20°C. The reactor was optically cleaned using a mixture of 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (30 L) and H20 (20 L). The org. layer was placed in the reactor and stored at -20°C for 14.5 h . While stirring at 150 rpm, the org. layer (suspension) was diluted with acetonitrile (16 L) and water (15 L) and warmed up to 5°C. At 5°C, acetic acid (0.172 kg) was added over 5 min. to a pH of 6; resulting in a mixture that was a pale brown solution. ((3aR,4R,6R,6aS)-2,2-dimethyl-6-((2-(3-((trifluoromethyl)thio)phenyl)pyrazolo[l,5-a]pyrimidin-7-yl)amino)tetrahydro-3aH-cyclopenta[d][l,3]dioxol-4-yl)methyl tert-butoxycarbonylsulfamate (2.0 g; prepared in a similar manner to that described above Example 2, Step 5) was added as seed. At 5°C, acetic acid (0.515 kg) was added over 15 min. to pH 4-5; a suspension formed. The feeding tank was rinsed with water (1.6 L). The mixture was stirred at 5°C with 90 rpm for 1.5 h, then it was transferred in a 50 L filter and filtered at 1.2 bar N2, in only 4 min. The filter cake was washed 4 x with cold acetonitrile (8 L, 0-5°C), then it was dried on the filter at 20°C for 8 h at 200 mbar, using a slight stream of N2. The yield of the title compound was 3.594 kg (62%). MR spectrum was consistent with that described above in Example 2.

[0177] Step 6: friR.2R.3S.4R 2.3-dihvdroxY-4-ff2-f3-fftrifluoromethvntliio phenvnDyrazolori.5-alpyrimidin-7-yl)aminokvciopent>T)mcthyl sulfamate Compound 1

[0178] 3.538 kg of ((3aR,4R,6R,6aS)-2,2-dimethyl-6-((2-(3-((trifluoromethyl)thio)phenyl)pyrazolo[l,5-a]pyrimidin-7-yl)amino)tetrahydro-3aH-cyclopenta[d][l,3]dioxol-4-yl)methyl tert-butoxycarbonylsulfamate was suspended in 13.5 kg of acetonitrile and cooled to 5°C. To this mixture was added 27.3 kg of H3PO4 over 1 hour and 50 minutes. The reaction was warmed to 20°C over 50 minutes and then stirred for 8h at 22°C. HPLC analysis showed the reaction was 99.69% complete. To the first portion (50% of the reaction mixture) was added 8.9 kg of water and 7.95 kg of ethyl acetate. The pH was then adjusted to 6.5 with 48 L of saturated sodium carbonate. 7.7 kg of ethyl acetate was added and the phases were separated. To the second portion (50% of the reaction mixture) was added 8.9 kg of water and 7.95 kg of ethyl acetate. The pH was then adjusted to 6.15 with 48 L of saturated sodium carbonate. 7.7 kg of ethyl acetate was added and the phases were separated. The organic phases were combined in a vessel (rinsed with 1.8 kg of ethyl acetate) and washed with 17.8 kg of water. The phases were separated and 17.8 kg of water and 0.237 kg of NaCl were added and the phases were separated. A repeat of wash with 17.8 kg of water and 0.237 kg of NaCl was added and the phases were separated. The organic layers were then combined and the temperature of the mixture was raised to 40°C and the pressure was reduced to 300-142 mbar. 27 L of liquid was distilled off over 4h. 31.7 kg of acetonitrile were then added to the solution and the temperature of the mixture was raised to 38°C and the pressure was reduced to 320-153 mbar. 26 L of liquid was distilled over 3h. 31.7 kg of acetonitrile were then added to the solution and the temperature of the mixture was raised to 37°C and the pressure was reduced to 320-153 mbar. 34 L of liquid was distilled over 2h. The suspension was stirred for lh at 50°C and then cooled to 20-25°C over 3h. The reaction was stirred overnight and the product was filtered and washed with 8.9 kg of acetonitrile twice. The cake was dried for 2h at 20°C (33 mbar) then at 40-45°C (1 mbar) to afford 2.08 kg (75.8%) of the title compound. 2.066 kg of ((lR,2R,3S,4R)-2,3-dihydroxy-4-((2-(3 -((trifluoromethyl)thio)phenyl)pyrazolo[ 1 , 5 -a]pyrimidin-7-yl)amino)cyclopenty l)methy 1 sulfamate was loaded into a reactor with 9.76 kg of acetronitrile and 4.12 kg of water and heated at a temperature of 56 °C for 1 hour and 10 minutes until dissolved. The solution was polished filtered and the filter was

rinsed with 3.16 kg acetonitrile and 1.37 kg of water. To the resulting solution was added with 11.0 kg of water over 45 minutes while maintaining the reaction temperature between 52-55°C. 0.009 kg of (( 1 R,2R,3S,4R)-2,3 -dihydroxy-4-((2-(3 -((trifluoromethyl)thio)phenyl)pyrazolo[ 1 ,5-a]pyrimidin-7-yl)amino)cyclopentyl)methyl sulfamate was added as seed (prepared in a similar manner to that described above Example 2, Step 5). A suspension was visible after 10 minutes of stirring. To the solution was added 9.62 kg of water over 3h while maintaining the reaction temperature between 50-55°C. The suspension was then cooled over 3h to 20°C and stirred for 12h at 22-23°C. The suspension was then filtered and washed twice with 13.7 kg of water. The product was dried at 40°C. 1.605 kg of the title compound was obtained in 78% yield. NMR spectrum was consistent with that described above in Example 2.

 

PATENT

WO2016069392

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2016069392&recNum=162&docAn=US2015057062&queryString=FP:(%22cancer%22)%20AND%20EN_ALL:nmr&maxRec=28697

SYNTHESIS

STR1

STR1

STR1

 

Juno reaches Jupiter!

///////////////1450833-55-2, MLN 7243, TAK-243,  TAK 243,  TAK243,  MLN7243; MLN-7243,  MLN 7243,  AOB87172,  AOB-87172,  AOB 87172, Millennium Pharmaceuticals, Inc., PHASE 1, TAKEDA ONCOLOGY
COS(=O)(=O)N[C@H]1C[C@H]([C@@H]([C@@H]1O)O)NC2=CC=NC3=CC(=NN23)C4=CC(=CC=C4)SC(F)(F)F
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PF-06282999

 phase 1, Uncategorized  Comments Off on PF-06282999
Jul 052016
 

  Figure imgf000061_0002

PF 6282999

Alternative Names: PF-06282999; PF-6282999, PF-06282999

Cas 1435467-37-0

[2-(6-(5-chloro-2-methoxyphenyl)-4-oxo-2-thioxo-3,4-dihydropyrimidin-1(2H)-yl)acetamide]

2-(6-(5-chloro-2-methoxyphenyl)-4-oxo-2-thioxo-3,4-dihydropyrimidin-1(2H)-yl)acetamide

MF C13H12ClN3O3S
Molecular Weight: 325.767
Elemental Analysis: C, 47.93; H, 3.71; Cl, 10.88; N, 12.90; O, 14.73; S, 9.84

Irreversible inactivator of myeloperoxidase

Currently in clinical trials for the potential treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

Phase I

  • Phase I Acute coronary syndromes

Most Recent Events

  • 01 Mar 2015 Pfizer terminates phase I trial in Healthy volunteers in USA (NCT01965600)
  • 10 Sep 2014 Pfizer completes enrolment in its phase I trial in Healthy volunteers in USA (NCT01965600)
  • 01 Feb 2014 Phase-I clinical trials in volunteers in USA (PO)

A drug potentially for the treatment of acute coronary syndrome (ACS).

img

PF-06282999 is a potent and selective myeloperoxidase Inhibitor which is potential useful for the Treatment of Cardiovascular Diseases. PF-06282999 displayed excellent oral pharmacokinetics in preclinical species and robust irreversible inhibition of plasma MPO activity both in human blood stimulated exogenously and in plasma collected after oral (po) administration to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated cynomolgus monkeys.

PF-06282999 has been advanced into first-in-human pharmacokinetics and safety studies. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a heme peroxidase that catalyzes the production of hypochlorous acid. Clinical evidence suggests a causal role for MPO in various autoimmune and inflammatory disorders including vasculitis and cardiovascular and Parkinson’s diseases, implying that MPO inhibitors may represent a therapeutic treatment option

The thiouracil derivative PF-06282999 [2-(6-(5-chloro-2-methoxyphenyl)-4-oxo-2-thioxo-3,4-dihydropyrimidin-1(2H)-yl)acetamide] is an irreversible inactivator of myeloperoxidase and is currently in clinical trials for the potential treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Concerns over idiosyncratic toxicity arising from bioactivation of the thiouracil motif to reactive species in the liver have been largely mitigated through the physicochemical (molecular weight, lipophilicity, and topological polar surface area) characteristics of PF-06282999, which generally favor elimination via nonmetabolic routes.

To test this hypothesis, pharmacokinetics and disposition studies were initiated with PF-06282999 using animals and in vitro assays, with the ultimate goal of predicting human pharmacokinetics and elimination mechanisms. Consistent with its physicochemical properties, PF-06282999 was resistant to metabolic turnover from liver microsomes and hepatocytes from animals and humans and was devoid of cytochrome P450 inhibition. In vitro transport studies suggested moderate intestinal permeability and minimal transporter-mediated hepatobiliary disposition. PF-06282999 demonstrated moderate plasma protein binding across all of the species.

Pharmacokinetics in preclinical species characterized by low to moderate plasma clearances, good oral bioavailability at 3- to 5-mg/kg doses, and renal clearance as the projected major clearance mechanism in humans. Human pharmacokinetic predictions using single-species scaling of dog and/or monkey pharmacokinetics were consistent with the parameters observed in the first-in-human study, conducted in healthy volunteers at a dose range of 20-200 mg PF-06282999.

In summary, disposition characteristics of PF-06282999 were relatively similar across preclinical species and humans, with renal excretion of the unchanged parent emerging as the principal clearance mechanism in humans, which was anticipated based on its physicochemical properties and supported by preclinical studies.

STR1

PAPER

Journal of Medicinal Chemistry (2015), 58(21), 8513-8528.

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acs.jmedchem.5b00963

Discovery of 2-(6-(5-Chloro-2-methoxyphenyl)-4-oxo-2-thioxo-3,4-dihydropyrimidin-1(2H)-yl)acetamide (PF-06282999): A Highly Selective Mechanism-Based Myeloperoxidase Inhibitor for the Treatment of Cardiovascular Diseases

Abstract Image

Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a heme peroxidase that catalyzes the production of hypochlorous acid. Clinical evidence suggests a causal role for MPO in various autoimmune and inflammatory disorders including vasculitis and cardiovascular and Parkinson’s diseases, implying that MPO inhibitors may represent a therapeutic treatment option. Herein, we present the design, synthesis, and preclinical evaluation of N1-substituted-6-arylthiouracils as potent and selective inhibitors of MPO. Inhibition proceeded in a time-dependent manner by a covalent, irreversible mechanism, which was dependent upon MPO catalysis, consistent with mechanism-based inactivation. N1-Substituted-6-arylthiouracils exhibited low partition ratios and high selectivity for MPO over thyroid peroxidase and cytochrome P450 isoforms. N1-Substituted-6-arylthiouracils also demonstrated inhibition of MPO activity in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human whole blood. Robust inhibition of plasma MPO activity was demonstrated with the lead compound 2-(6-(5-chloro-2-methoxyphenyl)-4-oxo-2-thioxo-3,4-dihydropyrimidin-1(2H)-yl)acetamide (PF-06282999, 8) upon oral administration to lipopolysaccharide-treated cynomolgus monkeys. On the basis of its pharmacological and pharmacokinetic profile, PF-06282999 has been advanced to first-in-human pharmacokinetic and safety studies.

tan solid (mp = 165.3 °C).

1H NMR (500 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 12.85 (s, 1 H), 7.57 (dd, J = 9.03, 2.68 Hz, 1 H), 7.33 (s, 1 H), 7.17–7.23 (m, 2 H), 7.10 (s, 1 H), 5.89 (d, J = 1.71 Hz, 1 H), 5.41 (br s, 1 H), 3.89 (br s, 1 H), 3.84 (s, 3 H).

MS (ES+) m/z: 326.0 [M + H]+. HRMS: m/z calcd for C13H13ClN3O3S [M + H]+ 326.0366, found 326.0361.

Anal. Calcd for C13H12ClN3O3S: C, 47.93; H, 3.71; N, 12.90; S, 9.84. Found: C, 47.81; H, 3.70; N, 12.83; S, 9.83. HPLC purity: >95%.

PATENT

WO 2013068875

http://www.google.co.in/patents/WO2013068875A1?cl=en

Beta Keto Ester Route Section

A. Carboxylic Acid Route Section

Preparation 1

Figure imgf000060_0001

Ethyl 3-(5-chloro-2-methoxyphenyl)-3-oxopropanoate

A 3000 mL 3-necked round-bottomed flask flushed with nitrogen was charged with magnesium ethoxide (67.46 g, 589.51 mmoles) and THF (1 100 mL), and the resulting mixture was stirred as ethyl hydrogen malonate (162.26 g, 1 .18 moles; 145.00 mL diluted in 100 ml of THF) was added and the mixture was heated at 45 °C for 4 hours. Meanwhile, a 2000 mL 3-necked round-bottomed flask flushed with nitrogen was charged with 5-chloro-2-methoxybenzoic acid (100 g, 536 mmoles) and THF (600 mL). To this mixture stirring at room temperature was added 1 , 1 ‘-carbonyldiimidazole (95.59 g, 589.5 mmoles) in portions to avoid excess foaming. After stirring for 3 hours at room temperature the second solution was added gradually to the first solution. After addition the reaction mixture was heated to 45 °C. After 20 hours, the reaction mixture was concentrated under reduced pressure before adding ethyl acetate (1 L) followed by 2 N HCI (500 mL). After mixing, the layers were separated and the organic phase was washed sequentially with 2 N HCI (500 mL), saturated sodium bicarbonate (500 mL), and water (500 mL). The organic phase was concentrated under reduced pressure, the residue taken up in ethyl acetate (1000 mL) and concentrated again to afford the title compound (104.94 g).

MS (ES+) 257.2 [M+1 ]+. 1 H NMR showed product as a 7.5:1 keto:enol mixture. For the keto tautomer: 1 H NMR (500 MHz, CDCI3) δ ppm 7.85 (d, J=2.93 Hz, 1 H) 7.45 (dd, J=8.90, 2.81 Hz, 1 H) 6.92 (d, J=8.78 Hz, 1 H) 4.18 (q, J=7.16 Hz, 2 H) 3.95 (s, 2 H) 3.90 (s, 3 H) 1 .24 (t, J=7.07 Hz, 3 H). Preparation 2

Figure imgf000061_0001

(Z)-Ethyl 3-((2-amino-2-oxoethyl)amino)-3-(5-chloro-2-methoxyphenyl)acrylate A 5-L reaction vessel was charged with methanol (3.3 L), sodium methoxide (102.4 g, 1.8 moles), and glycinamide hydrochloride (202 g, 1.8 moles). The mixture was heated at 65 °C for 1 hour before cooling to 50 °C and adding acetic acid (514.25 mmoles, 30.88 g, 29.47 ml.) and ethyl 3-(5-chloro-2-methoxyphenyl)-3-oxopropanoate (300 g, 1.03 mole). After heating to reflux for 16 hours, the reaction mixture was stirred as it was cooled to 10 °C. After 30 min the resulting solid was collected by vacuum filtration, pulling dry to form a cake that was dried in a vacuum oven (20 mm Hg, 65 °C) for 14 hours to afford the title compound (339.4 g).

MS (ES+) 313.2 [M+1]+. 1H NMR (500 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ ppm 8.80 (t, J=5.00 Hz, 1 H) 7.47 (dd, J=8.90, 2.81 Hz, 1 H) 7.27 (br. s., 1 H) 7.22 (d, J=2.68 Hz, 1 H) 7.14 (d, J=8.78 Hz, 1 H) 7.09 (br. s., 1 H) 4.30 (s, 1 H) 4.03 (q, J=7.07 Hz, 2 H) 3.80 (s, 3 H) 3.56 (br. s., 1 H) 3.45 (br. s., 1 H) 1.18 (t, J=7.07 Hz, 3 H).

Example 1

Figure imgf000061_0002

2-( 6-(5-Chloro-2-methoxyphenyl)-4-oxo-2-thioxo-3, 4-dihydropyrimidin

acetamide

A reaction vessel equipped with an efficient stirrer was charged with (Z)-ethyl 3-((2- amino-2-oxoethyl)amino)-3-(5-chloro-2-methoxyphenyl)acrylate (15 g, 50.2 mmol), butyl acetate (150 ml.) and trimethylsilyl isothiocyanate (160.7 mmole, 21 .1 g, 22.7 ml.) and the mixture was heated to reflux. After 15 hours, the mixture was cooled to 30 °C and treated with 1 N aqueous sodium hydroxide (1 12.5 ml_, 1 12.5 mmoles). After 30 min, the organic layer was separated and extracted with another portion of 1 N sodium hydroxide (37.5 ml_, 37.5 mmoles). The combined aqueous phases were extracted twice with dichloromethane (2 x 45 mL), filtered, and treated with 6N HCI until a pH of 2.5 was achieved. After stirring for 1 hour, the resulting solid was isolated by vacuum filtration, resuspended in 100 mL of a 1 :1 methanol-water solution, heated with stirring at 50 °C for 2 hours, and cooled to room temperature before collecting the solid by vacuum filtration, pulling dry and drying in a vacuum oven (20 mm Hg, 50 °C) for 12 hours to afford 8.7 g of the desired product as a tan solid.

MS (ES+) 326.0 [M+1]+. 1H NMR (500 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ ppm 12.85 (s, 1 H) 7.57 (dd, J=9.03, 2.68 Hz, 1 H) 7.33 (s, 1 H) 7.17 – 7.23 (m, 2 H) 7.10 (s, 1 H) 5.89 (d, J=1.71 Hz, 1 H) 5.41 (br. s, 1 H) 3.89 (br. s, 1 H) 3.84 (s, 3 H).

Alternative Preparation of Example 1

Figure imgf000062_0001

2-( 6-( 5-Chloro-2-methoxyphenyl)-4-oxo-2-thioxo-3, 4-dihydropyrimidin- 1 ( 2H)-yl) acetamide A slurry of (Z)-ethyl 3-((2-amino-2-oxoethyl)amino)-3-(5-chloro-2- methoxyphenyl)acrylate (20 g, 63 mmol) in a mixture of butyl acetate (140 mL) and DMF (38 mL) was treated with trimethylsilyl isothiocyanate (16.8 g, 125 mmol) and the mixture was heated at 1 15-120 °C for 5-6 hours. The mixture was cooled to 0-5 °C, butyl acetate (100 mL) was added and the mixture was slurried for 8 hours. The formed solids were filtered, and the filter cake was washed with butyl acetate (2 x 100 mL). The solid was dried in a vacuum oven at 50 °C for 12 hours to a tan solid. The solid was dissolved in a 5:1 mixture of DMF and water at room temperature and additional water was added slowly to crystallize the material. The slurry was cooled to 10 °C and stirred for 8 hours, followed by filtration and washing with water. The filter cake was dried in a vacuum oven at 50 °C for 8 hours. The solid was dissolved in a 1 :1 mixture of methanol and water and the slurry was heated to 50 °C and held at this temperature for 2 hours. After cooling to 10 °C over 30 minutes, the slurry was held at this temperature for 1 hour, filtered and washed with water and dried in a vacuum oven at 50 °C for 8 hours to give the title compound as a white solid. MS (ES+) 326.0 [M+1]+.1H NMR (500 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ ppm 12.85 (s, 1 H) 7.57 (dd, J=9.03, 2.68 Hz, 1 H) 7.33 (s, 1 H) 7.17 – 7.23 (m, 2 H) 7.10 (s, 1 H) 5.89 (d, J=1.71 Hz, 1 H) 5.41 (br. s, 1 H) 3.89 (br. s, 1 H) 3.84 (s, 3 H).

 

 

REFERENCES

1: Ruggeri RB, Buckbinder L, Bagley SW, Carpino PA, Conn EL, Dowling MS, Fernando DP, Jiao W, Kung DW, Orr ST, Qi Y, Rocke BN, Smith A, Warmus JS, Zhang Y, Bowles D, Widlicka DW, Eng H, Ryder T, Sharma R, Wolford A, Okerberg C, Walters K, Maurer TS, Zhang Y, Bonin PD, Spath SN, Xing G, Hepworth D, Ahn K, Kalgutkar AS. Discovery of 2-(6-(5-Chloro-2-methoxyphenyl)-4-oxo-2-thioxo-3,4-dihydropyrimidin-1(2H)-yl)acetamide (PF-06282999): A Highly Selective Mechanism-Based Myeloperoxidase Inhibitor for the Treatment of Cardiovascular Diseases. J Med Chem. 2015 Oct 28. [Epubahead of print] PubMed PMID: 26509551.

////////////PF 06282999, 1435467-37-0, PFIZER, PHASE 1, PF-06282999; PF-6282999, PF06282999, ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME

O=C(N)CN(C(N1)=S)C(C2=CC(Cl)=CC=C2OC)=CC1=O

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RO-5126766

 phase 1, Uncategorized  Comments Off on RO-5126766
Jul 032016
 

RO5126766(CH5126766)

CHEBI:78825.png

RO-5126766

946128-88-7
MW 471.46
MF C21H18FN5O5S

Phase I

3-​[[2-​[(Methylaminosulfony​l)​amino]​-​3-​ fluoropyridin-​4-​yl]​methyl]​-​4-​methyl-​7-​[(pyrimidin-​2-​yl)​oxy]​- ​2H-​1-​benzopyran-​2-​one

3-[[3-fluoro-2-(methylsulfamoylamino)pyridin-4-yl]methyl]-4-methyl-7-pyrimidin-2-yloxychromen-2-one
Chugai Seiyaku Kabushiki Kaisha

Chugai Seiyaku Kabushiki Kaisha, Sakai, Toshiyuki

Hoffmann-La Roche
Collaborators:
Institute of Cancer Research, United Kingdom
Chugai Pharmaceutical

A MEK1/Raf inhibitor potentially for the treatment of solid tumors and multiple myeloma.

RO-5126766; RG-7304; CH-5126766; CKI-27; R-7304

CAS No. 946128-88-7

Although melanoma is the most aggressive skin cancer, recent advances in BRAF and/or MEK inhibitors against BRAF-mutated melanoma have improved survival rates. Despite these advances, a treatment strategy targeting NRAS-mutated melanoma has not yet been elucidated. We discovered CH5126766/RO5126766 as a potent and selective dual RAF/MEK inhibitor currently under early clinical trials. We examined the activity of CH5126766/RO5126766 in a panel of malignant tumor cell lines including melanoma with a BRAF or NRAS mutation. Eight cell lines including melanoma were assessed for their sensitivity to the BRAF, MEK, or RAF/MEK inhibitor using in vitro growth assays. CH5126766/RO5126766 induced G1 cell cycle arrest in two melanoma cell lines with the BRAF V600E or NRAS mutation. In these cells, the G1 cell cycle arrest was accompanied by up-regulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27 and down-regulation of cyclinD1. CH5126766/RO5126766 was more effective at reducing colony formation than a MEK inhibitor in NRAS- or KRAS-mutated cells. In the RAS-mutated cells, CH5126766/RO5126766 suppressed the MEK reactivation caused by a MEK inhibitor. In addition, CH5126766/RO5126766 suppressed the tumor growth in SK-MEL-2 xenograft model

A method for producing a coumarin derivative of general formula (VII) is disclosed in Patent document 1 or 2. Patent document 1 or 2 discloses a method represented by the scheme below [In the scheme, DMF represents N,N-dimethylformamide, TBS represents a tert-butyldimethylsilyl group, dba represents dibenzylideneacetone, and BINAP represents 2,2′-bis(diphenylphosphino)-1,1′-binaphthyl. Also, the numerical values (%) and “quant.” given below some structural formulas indicate the yields of the respective compounds], for example (see the manufacturing example for “compound 1j-2-16-2K” in Patent document 1 or 2).

Figure US20140213786A1-20140731-C00003

Figure US20140213786A1-20140731-C00004

CITATION LIST Patent Literature

Patent document 1: WO 2007/091736

Patent document 2: WO 2009/014100

PATENT

http://www.google.co.in/patents/EP1982982A1?cl=en

      Compound 1j-2-16-2:

3-{2-(Methylaminosulfonyl)amino-3-fluoropyridin-4-ylmethyl}-4-methyl-7-(pyrimidin-2-yloxy)-2-oxo-2H-1-benzopyranFigure imgb0341

 

Methylamine (158 µL, 317 µmol) and DMAP (38.7 mg, 317 µmol) were added at -78 °C to a solution of sulfuryl chloride (28 µL, 340 µmol) in dichloromethane (2 mL), and the mixture was then stirred at room temperature for 2 hours to yield the corresponding sulfamoyl chloride. 3-(2-Amino-3-fluoropyridin-4-ylmethyl)-7-(pyrimidin-2-yloxy)-4-methyl-2-oxo-2H-1-benzopyran (compound 1h-2-16) (60 mg, 159 µmol), pyridine (65 µL, 795 µmol) and dichloromethane (2 mL) were added to the reaction solution, and the mixture was stirred at room temperature for 4 hours. After addition of water, the organic layer was extracted with dichloromethane. After washing with sodium hydrogen carbonate solution and saturated saline, the organic layer was dried over anhydrous magnesium sulfate, and the solvent was distilled away under reduced pressure. The resultant residue was purified by silica gel column chromatography to yield the title compound (32 mg, 43%).

 

1H NMR (CD3OD, 270 MHz) δ (ppm): 2.54 (3H, s), 2.62 (3H, s), 4.22 (2H, s), 6.84 (1H, dd, J = 5.4 Hz), 7.20-7.30 (3H, m), 7.80-7.95 (2H, m), 8.63 (2H, d, J = 4.9 Hz)

ESI (LC/MS positive mode) m/z: 472 (M + H).

      Compound 1j-2-16-2Na:

3-(2-(N-Methylsulfamoyl)amino-3-fluoropyridin-4-ylmethyl)-4-methyl-7-(pyrimidin-2-yloxy)-2-oxo-2H-1-benzopyran sodium saltFigure imgb0342

 

The title compound was synthesized under the same conditions as in the manufacturing example for compound 1j-1-5-1Na, except that compound 1j-2-16-2 was used instead of compound 1j-1-5-1.

1H NMR (DMSO-d6, 270 MHz) δ (ppm): 2.30 (3H, s), 2.46 (3H, s), 3.89 (2H, s), 5.68 (1H, brs), 6.09-6.23 (1H, m), 7.20 (1H, dd, J = 2.4, 8.7 Hz), 7.34 (1H, t, J = 4.8 Hz), 7.38 (1H, d, J = 2.4 Hz), 7.55 (1H, d, J = 5.3 Hz), 7.90 (1H, d, J = 8.7 Hz), 8.69 (1H, d, J = 4.8 Hz).

ESI (LC/MS positive mode) m/z: 472 (M + 2H – Na).

      Compound 1j-2-16-2K:

3-(2-(N-Methylsulfamoyl)amino-3-fluoropyridin-4-ylmethyl)-4-methyl-7-(pyrimidin-2-yloxy)-2-oxo-2H-1-benzopyran potassium saltFigure imgb0343

The title compound was synthesized under the same conditions as in the manufacturing example for compound 1j-1-5-1Na, except that compound 1j-2-16-2 was used instead of compound 1j-1-5-1, and that KOH was used instead of NaOH.

1H NMR (DMSO-d6, 270 MHz) δ (ppm): 2.36 (3H, s), 2.47 (3H, s), 3.93 (2H, s), 6.26-6.40 (1H, m), 7.27 (1H, dd, J = 2.3, 8.6 Hz), 7.34 (1H, t, J = 4.8 Hz), 7.39 (1H, d, J = 2.3 Hz), 7.64 (1H, d, J = 4.8 Hz), 7.91 (1H, d, J = 8.6 Hz), 8.69 (1H, d, J = 4.8 Hz).

ESI (LC/MS positive mode) m/z: 472 (M + 2H – K).

 

PAPER

ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters (2014), 5(4), 309-314.

Optimizing the Physicochemical Properties of Raf/MEK Inhibitors by Nitrogen Scanning

Research Division, Chugai Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., 200 Kajiwara, Kamakura, Kanagawa 247-8530, Japan
Research Division, Chugai Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., 1-135 Komakado, Gotemba, Shizuoka 412-8513, Japan
ACS Med. Chem. Lett., 2014, 5 (4), pp 309–314
DOI: 10.1021/ml400379x
Publication Date (Web): January 22, 2014
Abstract Image

Substituting a carbon atom with a nitrogen atom (nitrogen substitution) on an aromatic ring in our leads 11a and 13g by applying nitrogen scanning afforded a set of compounds that improved not only the solubility but also the metabolic stability. The impact after nitrogen substitution on interactions between a derivative and its on- and off-target proteins (Raf/MEK, CYPs, and hERG channel) was also detected, most of them contributing to weaker interactions. After identifying the positions that kept inhibitory activity on HCT116 cell growth and Raf/MEK, compound 1(CH5126766/RO5126766) was selected as a clinical compound. A phase I clinical trial is ongoing for solid cancers.

STR1

STR1

PATENT

https://www.google.com/patents/US20140213786

Step 5 Synthesis of 4-methyl-3-(3-fluoro-2-aminopyridin-4-ylmethyl)-7-(pyrimidin-2-yloxy)-2-oxo-2H-1-benzopyranFigure US20140213786A1-20140731-C00047

Under a nitrogen atmosphere, potassium carbonate (2.3 g, 17 mmol) was added to a solution of the solid product of step 4 (3.0 g) and 2-bromopyrimidine (1.6 g, 9.8 mmol) in DMF (48 mL), and the mixture was stirred at 115° C. for 2.5 hours. The reaction mixture was cooled to 28° C., water (48 mL) was added dropwise over a period of 5 minutes at that temperature, and after cooling to 0° C., the mixture was stirred for 2 hours. The precipitated crystals were collected by filtration, washed with water (24 mL) and acetonitrile (24 mL) in that order, and dried under reduced pressure to obtain crude crystals (2.3 g). DMF (65 mL) was added to the crude crystals (2.3 g), and after heating to 60° C. and confirming the dissolution, the mixture was cooled to 25° C. Water (65 mL) was added at 25° C., and the mixture was further cooled to 0° C. and stirred for 4 hours. The precipitated crystals were collected by filtration, washed with water (22 mL) and acetonitrile (22 mL) in that order, and dried under reduced pressure to obtain the title compound (2.1 g). The title compound is a compound disclosed in WO 2007/091736.

Yield (overall yield from the 2-acetylamino-5-chloro-3-fluoropyridine used in step 2): 27%

Patent

https://www.google.com/patents/US20100004233

Compound 1h-2-16:

3-(3-Fluoro-2-aminopyridin-4-ylmethyl)-4-methyl-7-(pyrimidin-2-yloxy)-2-oxo-2H-1-benzopyranFigure US20100004233A1-20100107-C00146

The title compound was synthesized under the same conditions as in the manufacturing example for compound 1h-2-4 (synthesis scheme 2), except that compound 5d-0-16 was used instead of compound 4a-0-4.

1H NMR (DMSO-d6, 270 MHz) δ (ppm): 2.45-2.55 (3H, m), 3.94 (2H, s), 6.12 (2H, brs), 6.28 (1H, dd, J=4.7 Hz), 7.27 (1H, dd, J=8.6 Hz, J=2.1 Hz), 7.34 (1H, dd, J=4.9 Hz), 7.38 (1H, d, J=2.1 Hz), 7.58 (1H, d, J=4.7 Hz), 7.91 (1H, d, J=8.6 Hz), 8.68 (2H, d, J=4.7 Hz).

ESI (LC/MS positive mode) m/z: 479 (M+H).

 

 Compound 1j-2-4-2:

3-{2-Fluoro-3-(methylaminosulfonyl)aminobenzyl}-4-methyl-7-(pyrimidin-2-yloxy)-2-oxo-2H-1-benzopyranFigure US20100004233A1-20100107-C00274

The title compound was synthesized under the same conditions as in the manufacturing example for compound 1j-1-5-2, except that compound 1h-2-4 was used instead of compound 1h-1-5.

1H NMR (270 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ (ppm): 2.45 (3H, s), 3.99 (2H, s), 6.83-6.92 (1H, m), 6.97-7.06 (1H, m), 7.17 (1H, brs), 7.34-7.40 (4H, m), 7.91 (1H, d, J=8.4 Hz), 8.69 (2H, dd, J=4.8, 1.2 Hz), 9.38 (1H, br.s).

One of the CH3 peaks was overlapped with the DMSO peak.

ESI (LC/MS positive mode) m/z: 471 (M+H).

Compound 1j-2-4-2Na:

3-{2-Fluoro-3-(methylaminosulfonyl)aminobenzyl}-4-methyl-7-(pyrimidin-2-yloxy)-2-oxo-2H-1-benzopyran sodium saltFigure US20100004233A1-20100107-C00275

The title compound was synthesized under the same conditions as in the manufacturing example for compound 1j-1-5-1Na, except that compound 1j-2-4-2 was used instead of compound 1j-1-5-1.

1H NMR (270 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ (ppm): 2.33 (3H, d, J=3.3 Hz), 2.43 (3H, s), 3.89 (2H, s), 6.10-6.19 (1H, m), 6.58-6.66 (1H, m), 7.17 (1H, ddd, J=8.3, 1.5 Hz, JHF=8.3 Hz), 7.25 (1H, dd, J=8.7, 2.3 Hz), 7.33 (1H, t, J=4.8 Hz), 7.37 (1H, d, J=2.3 Hz), 7.88 (1H, d, J=8.7 Hz), 8.69 (2H, d, J=4.8 Hz)

ESI (LC/MS positive mode) m/z: 471 (M+2H—Na).

Compound 1j-2-4-2K:

3-{2-Fluoro-3-(methylaminosulfonyl)aminobenzyl}-4-methyl-7-(pyrimidin-2-yl-oxy)-2-oxo-2H-1-benzopyran potassium saltFigure US20100004233A1-20100107-C00276

The title compound was synthesized under the same conditions as in the manufacturing example for compound 1j-1-5-1Na, except that compound 1j-2-4-2 was used instead of compound 1j-1-5-1, and that KOH was used instead of NaOH.

1H NMR (270 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ (ppm): 8.69 (d, 2H, J=4.8 Hz), 7.88 (d, 1H, J=8.7 Hz), 7.36 (d, 1H, J=2.3 Hz), 7.33 (t, 1H, J=4.8 Hz), 7.25 (dd, 1H, J=8.7, 2.3 Hz), 7.16 (td, 1H, J=8.5, 1.4 Hz), 6.59 (t, 1H, J=7.8 Hz), 6.10 (t, 1H, J=6.3 Hz), 4.76 (q, 1H, J=5.8 Hz), 3.88 (s, 2H), 2.43 (s, 3H), 2.32 (d, 3H, J=5.6 Hz).

ESI (LC-MS positive mode) m/z: 471 (M+2H—K).

PATENT

 WO 2013035754 

Method for producing a coumarin derivative of formula (VII) are described in Patent Documents 1 and 2. Patent Documents 1 and 2, for example, in the following scheme [scheme, DMF is N, represents a N- dimethylformamide, TBS represents a tert- butyldimethylsilyl group, dba represents dibenzylideneacetone, BINAP is 2, I represents a 2′-bis (diphenylphosphino) -1,1′-binaphthyl. Further, numerical values ​​given under the formula (%) or “quant.” Indicates the yield of the compound. Methods have been described that are shown in (see Preparation of “Compound 1j-2-16-2K” in Patent Documents 1 and 2).

Figure JPOXMLDOC01-appb-C000018

WO2007 / 091736 WO2009 / 014100

While coumarin derivatives of the general formula (VII) can be prepared by the methods described in Patent Documents 1 and 2, in the method described in Patent Documents 1 and 2, after the formylation reaction and a reduction reaction, and unintended Reaction To suppress, it is necessary to perform the introduction and removal steps of the protecting group for hydroxy group. Also, during the formylation reaction, from the viewpoint of cryogenic conditions of the reaction control (eg, -95 ℃ ~ -65 ℃) is required. Furthermore, the alkylation reaction (the seventh step in the above scheme), it is preferred that an excess amount of use of ethyl acetoacetate in terms of efficient synthesis, in which case, requires complicated operation of removing residual reagents become.

[Example 1]
Step 1:
Synthesis of 2-acetylamino-5-chloro-3-fluoropyridine:

Figure JPOXMLDOC01-appb-C000050

Under a nitrogen atmosphere, acetamide (94.8g, 1.61mol) in DMF with (200mL) and THF (830mL) was added and heated to 50 ℃. The resulting solution was a THF solution of 40wt% sodium hexamethyldisilazide (629g, 1.37mol) was added dropwise and stirred at the same temperature for 2 hours. 5-chloro-2,3-difluoro pyridine (100.0g, 0.67mol) After adding, THF and (20mL), and the mixture was stirred at the same temperature for 3 hours. After cooling to 0 ℃, it is added to 2.8M HCl (500mL) to the reaction mixture, and the organic layer was separated and the temperature was raised to room temperature.The organic layer was washed with 20wt% sodium chloride solution (500mL), and evaporated under reduced pressure. The residue in THF (500mL) was added, and the residue was dissolved by heating at 70 ℃. After confirming the solid precipitated by cooling to room temperature, n- heptane (1500mL) was added and further cooled to 0 ℃, followed by stirring at the same temperature for 3 hours. The The precipitated crystals were collected by filtration, to give after washing with a mixed solvent of THF (100mL) and n- heptane (500mL), and dried under reduced pressure to give the title compound (91.2g).
Yield: 72%
1 H-NMR (CDCl 3) δ (ppm): 2.36 (3H, s), 7.49 (1H, dd, J = 2.0,9.5Hz), 7.78 (1H, br), 8.17 (1H, d, J = 2.0Hz).
MS (ESI +): 189 [M + 1] +

Step 2:
Synthesis of 2-acetylamino-5-chloro-3-fluoro-4-formyl pyridine:

Figure JPOXMLDOC01-appb-C000051

Under a nitrogen atmosphere, and dissolved at room temperature 2-acetylamino-5-chloro-3-fluoropyridine (70.0g, 0.37mol) and 4-formyl-morpholine (128.2g, 1.11mol) to THF (840mL) It was. The solution was cooled to -20 ℃ and was added dropwise a THF solution of 24wt% of lithium hexamethyldisilazide (595g, 0.85mol), and stirred 5.5 hours at the same temperature. The reaction mixture, citric acid monohydrate (257g) and sodium chloride (70g) in an aqueous solution dissolved in water (420mL), and I was added at stirring at 0 ℃. The organic layer was separated and the resulting organic layer was successively washed with 50wt% phosphoric acid aqueous solution of potassium dihydrogen (350mL) and 20wt% sodium chloride solution (350mL) to (1458g). The portion of the organic layer was taken for analysis (292g), and evaporated remainder (1166g) at reduced pressure. The residue in THF (350mL) was added, and the solvent was distilled off under reduced pressure. Again, the residue in THF (350mL) was added to and evaporated under reduced pressure to give a solid (81.4g) containing the title compound. The product was used in the next step without further purification.
Some of the organic layer which had been collected (292g) to (29g), and evaporated under reduced pressure. The residue was purified by silica gel column chromatography: subjected to [eluent AcOEt / hexane (1 / 4-9 / 1)], I give the title compound (1.05g, 4.85mmol) as a white powdery solid.
Yield: 66%
1 H-NMR (CDCl 3) δ (ppm): 2.40 (3H, s), 7,59 (1H, br), 8.34 (1H, br), 10.42 (1H, s).
MS (ESI +): 217 (M + 1)

Step 3:
2 – [(4-2-acetylamino-3-fluoro-pyridin-yl) methyl] -3-oxobutanoic acid ethyl ester:

Figure JPOXMLDOC01-appb-C000052

Under a nitrogen atmosphere to dissolve the solid product of Step 2 (81.4g) in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (448mL), piperidine (4.4g, 51.7mmol), acetic acid (3.1g, 51 .7mmol) and 3-oxobutanoic acid ethyl (37.0g, 0.28mol) was added and stirred for 3 hours after raising the temperature to 50 ℃. After cooling the reaction mixture to room temperature, triethylamine (758mL, 5.5mol) and formic acid (172mL, 4.6mol) of 2-propanol (1248mL) solution and 20% Pd (OH) 2 carbon (21.2g, moisture content 46.2%) were added, followed by stirring for 4 hours the temperature was raised to 50 ℃. The reaction mixture was filtered through Celite, and the residue was washed with 2-propanol (679mL). Combined filtrate and washings (2795g), and evaporated under reduced pressure a part of the (399g) (remaining (2396g) I was saved). Ethyl acetate (24.2mL) was added to the residue obtained by evaporation of the solvent, and evaporated under reduced pressure. Again, the residue ethyl acetate (182mL) was added to the washed successively with an organic layer 20wt% brine (61mL), 10wt% of potassium dihydrogen phosphate solution (61mL) and 20wt% sodium chloride solution (61mL), under a reduced pressure The solvent was evaporated. Furthermore, in addition to the residue of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (24mL), and the solvent evaporated under reduced pressure to obtain oil containing the title compound (15.0g). The product was used in the next step without further purification.
1 H-NMR (CDCl 3) δ (ppm): 1.24 (3H, t, J = 7.0Hz), 2.27 (3H, s), 2.37 (3H, s), 3.16- 3.26 (2H, m), 3.86 (1H, t, J = 7.5Hz), 4.15-4.22 (2H, m), 6.98 (1H, t, J = 5.0Hz ), 7.68 (1H, br), 8.05 (1H, d, J = 5.0Hz).
MS (ESI +): 297 (M + 1)

Step 4:
Synthesis of 3- (3-fluoro-2-amino-pyridin-4-ylmethyl) -7-hydroxy-4-methyl-2-oxo -2H-1- benzopyran methanesulphonate:

Figure JPOXMLDOC01-appb-C000053

Under a nitrogen atmosphere, oily product of Step 3 (15.0g) and I were dissolved in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (33mL). The solution of resorcinol (5.3g, 47.9mmol) and methane sulfonic acid (11.7mL, 181mmol) was added at 24 ℃, and stirred for 4 hours at 90 ℃. And allowed to stand for 13 hours and cooled to room temperature and ethanol (33mL) and water (11mL), and the mixture was stirred for 4.5 hours at 90 ℃. After adding 2-propanol (105mL) was cooled to 55 ℃, and allowed to stand for 14 hours then cooled to room temperature. The The precipitated crystals were collected by filtration to give 2-propanol was washed twice with (33mL), and dried under reduced pressure to give the title compound (8.2g).
(Total from 2-acetylamino-5-chloro-3-fluoropyridine was used in step 2 Yield) Yield: 49%
MS (ESI +): 301 [M + 1-MsOH] +

Step 5:
4-methyl-3- (3-fluoro-2-amino-pyridin-4-ylmethyl) -7- (pyrimidin-2-yloxy) -2-oxo -2H-1- benzopyran Synthesis:

Figure JPOXMLDOC01-appb-C000054

Under a nitrogen atmosphere, 3- (3-fluoro-2-amino-pyridin-4-ylmethyl) -7-hydroxy-4-methyl-2-oxo -2H-1- benzopyran methanesulphonate (7.6g, 19.2mmol) and 2-bromo-pyrimidine (4.0g, 24.9mmol) was dissolved in DMF (122mL), potassium carbonate (5.8g, 42.2mmol) was added, and the mixture was stirred for 3.5 hours at 115 ℃. After cooling the reaction mixture to 28 ℃, water (122mL) was added dropwise over the same temperature for 0.5 hours, and stirred for 2 minutes. In addition, after cooling to 0 ℃, and the mixture was stirred for 1 hour, and the precipitated crystals were collected by filtration. The obtained crystals were washed successively with water (61mL) and acetonitrile (61mL), to give the title compound was dried under reduced pressure and crystals (6.5g).
The resultant was taken for analysis a portion of the crystals (0.1g), it was suspended remainder (6.4g) in DMF (70mL). The resulting suspension was stirred 60 ℃ and heated for 5 minutes and stirred for 80 minutes by the addition of acetonitrile (185mL) at the same temperature. Then, it was stirred for 0.5 hours and then cooled to 40 ℃, and the mixture was stirred for 0.5 hours and further cooled to 25 ℃. After a further 1.5 hours with stirring and cooled to 0 ℃, the precipitated crystals were collected by filtration. After washing the resulting crystals in acetonitrile (46mL), was obtained by drying under reduced pressure to the title compound (5.5g). Incidentally, the title compound is a compound described in WO2007 / 091736.
Yield: 76%

Step 6:
3- {2- (methyl-aminosulfonyl) amino-3-fluoro-pyridin-4-ylmethyl} -4-methyl-7- (pyridin-2-yloxy) -2-oxo -2H-1- benzopyran Synthesis:

Figure JPOXMLDOC01-appb-C000055

Under a nitrogen atmosphere, 4-methyl-3- (3-fluoro-2-amino-pyridin-4-ylmethyl) -7- (pyrimidin-2-yloxy) -2-oxo -2H-1- benzopyran (1.7g, 4 the .5mmol) it was suspended in DMF (18mL). To this solution pyridine (0.8mL, 9.9mmol) was cooled to In 10 ℃ added, N- methyl-sulfamoyl chloride (1.05g, 8.1mmol) in acetonitrile (18mL) solution of the internal temperature of 15 ℃ it was dropped so as to maintain below. After stirring for 90 minutes at the same temperature, acetonitrile (3.4mL) was added and further water (50mL), was added dropwise the inner temperature so as to maintain the 20 ℃ below. It was cooled to an external temperature of 0 ℃, and the mixture was stirred for an internal temperature of 5 ℃ 2 hours after arrival. The precipitated crystals were collected by filtration, washed with water (8.5mL), and dried to give the title compound (1.9g, 4.0mmol) was obtained.
Yield: 88%
MS (ESI +): 472 [M + 1] +

Step 7:
Synthesis of 3- {2- (methyl-aminosulfonyl) amino-3-fluoro-pyridin-4-ylmethyl} -4-methyl-7- (pyridin-2-yloxy) -2-oxo -2H-1- benzopyran potassium salt:

Figure JPOXMLDOC01-appb-C000056

Under a nitrogen atmosphere, 3- {2- (methyl-aminosulfonyl) amino-3-fluoro-pyridin-4-ylmethyl} -4-methyl-7- (pyridin-2-yloxy) -2-oxo -2H-1- benzopyran ( 1.6g, was suspended 3.4mmol) in THF (10mL), water (3mL) was added. The suspension in 2.0M aqueous potassium hydroxide (1.8mL, 3.6mmol) was added dropwise over 10 min at 25 ℃, after raising the temperature to 60 ℃, and the mixture was stirred for 2 hours at the same temperature. After cooling the reaction mixture to 20 ℃, it was added dropwise over a period of THF (8mL) 30 min. After completion of the dropwise addition, the mixture was cooled to an external temperature of -5 ℃, and the mixture was stirred for an internal temperature of 0 ℃ reached after 160 minutes. The precipitated crystals were collected by filtration, then washed with a mixture of THF (14mL) and water (1.6mL) (pre-cooled to 5 ℃), further washed with THF (8mL), and dried to give the title compound (0 .72g, we got 1.4mmol).
Yield: 42%
MS (ESI +): 472 [M + 2H-K] +

CLIP

RO5126766 (CH5126766) is a first-in-class dual inhibitor of Raf/MEK [1].

The RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK signaling pathway is an important signal transduction system and participates in cell differentiation, movement, division and death. Activated Ras activates RAF kinase, which then phosphorylates and activates MEK (MEK1 and MEK2) [1]. The mutations in BRAF, RAS, and NF1 are associated with many human tumors [2].

RO5126766 (CH5126766) is a first-in-class dual Raf/MEK inhibitor. In cell-free kinase assays, CH5126766 effectively inhibited the phosphorylation of MEK1 protein by RAF and the activation of ERK2 protein by MEK1 with IC50 values of 0.0082-0.056 and 0.16 μM, respectively. In NCI-H460 (KRAS Q61H) human lung large cell carcinoma cell line, RO5126766 induced cell-cycle inhibitor p27Kip1 protein expression and caused G1 arrest. In HCT116 KRAS-mutant colorectal cancer cells, RO5126766 CH5126766 completely inhibited the phosphorylation of MEK and ERK [2].

In Japanese patients with advanced solid tumors, RO5126766 exhibited the maximum tolerable dose (MTD) of 2.25 mg/day once daily [1]. In a HCT116 (G13D KRAS) mouse xenograft model, RO5126766 (1.5 mg/kg) inhibited pERK and ERK signaling and exhibited ED50 value of 0.056 mg/kg [2].

References:
[1].  Honda K, Yamamoto N, Nokihara H, et al. Phase I and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic study of RO5126766, a first-in-class dual Raf/MEK inhibitor, in Japanese patients with advanced solid tumors. Cancer Chemother Pharmacol, 2013, 72(3): 577-584.
[2].  Ishii N, Harada N, Joseph EW, et al. Enhanced inhibition of ERK signaling by a novel allosteric MEK inhibitor, CH5126766, that suppresses feedback reactivation of RAF activity. Cancer Res, 2013, 73(13): 4050-4060.

WO2007091736A1 9 Feb 2007 16 Aug 2007 Chugai Seiyaku Kabushiki Kaisha Novel coumarin derivative having antitumor activity
WO2009014100A1 18 Jul 2008 29 Jan 2009 Chugai Seiyaku Kabushiki Kaisha p27 PROTEIN INDUCER
JPH0236145A * Title not available
Reference
1 BIOORGANIC MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY, vol. 13, 2005, pages 1393 – 1402
2 JOURNAL OF MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY, vol. 47, 2004, pages 6447 – 6450
3 ORGANIC PREPARATIONS AND PROCEDURES INTERNATIONAL, vol. 36, 2004, pages 347 – 351
4 * See also references of EP2754654A1
5 * STANCHO STANCHEV, ET AL.: “Synthesis and Inhibiting Activity of Some 4-Hydroxycoumarin Derivatives on HIV-1 Protease. Art 137637“, ISRN PHARMACEUTICS, vol. 63, no. 10, 2011, pages 1 – 9, XP055145297
6 * STANCHO STANCHEV, ET AL.: “Synthesis, computational study and cytotoxic activity of new 4-hydroxycoumarin derivatives“, EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY, vol. 43, no. 4, 2008, pages 694 – 706, XP022576473
7 SYNTHETIC COMMUNICATIONS, vol. 34, 2004, pages 4301 – 4311
Patent ID Date Patent Title
US7897792 2011-03-01 Coumarin derivative having antitumor activity
US2011009398 2011-01-13 p27 Protein Inducer
Patent ID Date Patent Title
US2016024051 2016-01-28 SALTS AND SOLID FORMS OF ISOQUINOLINONES AND COMPOSITION COMPRISING AND METHODS OF USING THE SAME
US2015290207 2015-10-15 HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS AND USES THEREOF
US2015283142 2015-10-08 TREATMENT OF CANCERS USING PI3 KINASE ISOFORM MODULATORS
US2015225410 2015-08-13 HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS AND USES THEREOF
US2015111874 2015-04-23 HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS AND USES THEREOF
US2014377258 2014-12-25 Treatment Of Cancers Using PI3 Kinase Isoform Modulators
US2014213786 2014-07-31 Method for Producing Coumarin Derivative
US2014038920 2014-02-06 TFEB PHOSPHORYLATION INHIBITORS AND USES THEREOF
US2011092700 2011-04-21 Novel Coumarin Derivative Having Antitumor Activity
US7897792 2011-03-01 Coumarin derivative having antitumor activity

//////////////RO-512676, RG-7304,  CH-5126766,  CKI-27,  R-730, 946128-88-7, PHASE 1, MEK1/Raf inhibitor,  treatment of solid tumors and multiple myeloma, CANCER

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Tenatoprazole, テナトプラゾール

 phase 1, Uncategorized  Comments Off on Tenatoprazole, テナトプラゾール
Jun 232016
 

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Tenatoprazole.svg

Tenatoprazole

泰妥拉唑

Tenatoprazole; 113712-98-4; Ulsacare; Protop; TU 199; TU-199;
Molecular Formula: C16H18N4O3S
Molecular Weight: 346.40412 g/mol

5-methoxy-2-[(4-methoxy-3,5-dimethylpyridin-2-yl)methylsulfinyl]-1H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine

2-[2-(3,5-Dimethyl)pyridylmethylsulfinyl]-5-methoxyimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine

Phase I

PHASE 1 FOR ………..A proton pump inhibitor potentially for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

Research Code TU-199

CAS No. 113712-98-4

Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma and was licensed to Negma Laboratories

Tenatoprazole is a proton pump inhibitor drug candidate that was undergoing clinical testing as a potential treatment for refluxoesophagitis and peptic ulcer as far back as 2003.[1] The compound was invented by Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma and was licensed to Negma Laboratories (part of Wockhardt as of 2007[2]).[3]:22

Mitsubishi reported that tenatoprazole was still in Phase I clinical trials in 2007[4]:27 and again in 2012.[3]:17

Tenatoprazole has an imidazopyridine ring in place of the benzimidazole moiety found in other proton pump inhibitors, and has a half-life about seven times longer than other PPIs.[5]

Tenatoprazole is a novel imidazopyridine derivative and has an imidazopyridine ring in place of the benzimidazole moiety found in other proton pump inhibitors. It is activated more slowly than other proton pump inhibitor, but its inhibition is resistant to reversal.Tenatoprazole has an extended plasma half-life in comparison with those of all other proton pump inhibitors; this makes it more potent in the treatment of nocturnal acid breakthrough than esomeprazole, one of the most popular proton pump inhibitors.
Tenatoprazole belongs to the class of covalent proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which is converted to the active sulfenamide or sulfenic acid by acid in the secretory canaliculus of the stimulated parietal cell of the stomach.This active species binds to luminally accessible cysteines of the gastric H+,K+-ATPase, resulting in disulfide formation and acid secretion inhibition.Tenatoprazole binds at the catalytic subunit of the gastric acid pump with a stoichiometry of 2.6 nmol mg−1 of the enzyme in vitro. In vivo, maximum binding of tenatoprazole was 2.9 nmol mg−1of the enzyme at 2 h after intravenous (IV) administration.

Tenatoprazole, or (+)-5-methoxy-2-{[(4-methoxy-3,5-dimethyl-2-pyridyl) methyl] sulfinyl} imidazo-[4,5-b] pyridine, is described in Patent No. EP 254,588. It belongs to the group of drugs considered as proton pump inhibitors, which inhibit the secretion of gastric acid and are useful in the treatment of gastric and duodenal ulcers. It can also be used to treat gastro-oesophageal reflux, digestive bleeding and dyspepsia, because of its relatively long elimination half-life, as described in the application for French patent No. FR 02. 13113.

The first known derivative of this series of proton pump inhibitors was omeprazole, described in Patent No. EP 001,529, which is endowed with properties which inhibit the secretion of gastric acid and is widely employed as an anti-ulcerative in human therapeutics.

In addition to omeprazole, other proton pump inhibitors are well known, and particular mention can be made of rabeprazole, pantoprazole and lansoprazole, which all exhibit structural analogy and lansoprazole, which all exhibit structural analogy and belong to the group of pyridinyl methyl sulfinyl benzimidazoles. These compounds are sulfoxides presenting with asymmetry at the level of the sulphur atom, and therefore generally take the form of a racemic mixture of two enantiomers.

Like omeprazole and other sulfoxide with an analogue structure, tenatoprazole has an asymmetric structure and may therefore be present in the form of a racemic mixture or of its enantiomers. Thus it may exist in the form of its two enantiomers with R and S configurations, or (+) or (−), respectively.

Recent studies have shown that, unlike all the other proton pump inhibitors such as, for example, omeprazole or lansoprazole, and unexpectedly, tenatoprazole is endowed with a markedly prolonged duration of action, resulting from a plasma half-life which is about seven times longer. Thus the clinical data collected have shown that tenatoprazole enables a degree of symptom relief and healing of gastric lesions which is superior to that achieved by other drugs belonging to the same therapeutic category of proton pump inhibitors, which thus allows its effective use in the treatment of atypical and oesophageal symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux, digestive bleeding and dyspepsia, as indicated above.

Studies performed by the application have made it possible to show that the two enantiomers contribute differently to the properties of tenatoprazole, and that the two enantiomers, (+) and (−) exhibit significantly different pharmacokinetic properties. Thus it is possible to prepare medicinal products with specific activity by isolating the enantiomers, and these enantiomers themselves exhibit a different pharmacokinetic profile from that of the known racemic mixture. It then becomes possible to use each of these enantiomers more effectively in precise indications for the treatment of perfectly identified pathologies.

Tenatoprazole.png

Anti-ulcer drug
tenatoprazole (tenatoprazole) is a new proton pump inhibitor, by the Japanese company Tokyo Tanabe, Japan’s Mitsubishi Corporation and Japan’s Hokuriku pharmaceutical companies jointly developed, has passed Phase II clinical trials. It acts on gastric parietal cells, reducing treatment of gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer, reflux wall cell H + / K + -ATP activity, inhibition of gastric acid secretion, and H. pylori antibacterial activity, mainly for esophagitis and Zhuo – Ellison syndrome and gastric acid secretion disorders related diseases. Compared with the same types of drugs, Tenatoprazole suppress H + / K + -ATP enzyme activity is stronger, more stable, its efficacy than similar products currently widely used in clinical omeprazole strong 7 times. It has not been in the domestic market, nor ratified the production, with broad market prospects and development potential.
Proton pump inhibitors (proton pump inhibitors) for the treatment of acid-related diseases, the past ten years a wide range of clinical applications, better effect of the drug. It can quickly pass through the stomach wall membrane, gathered in a strongly acidic secretory tubules, and H + / K + -ATP enzyme (proton pump) thiol groups covalently bonded to form a disulfide bond, proton pump inactivation, inhibition of the enzyme H + / K + transport, so as to achieve the effect of acid suppression. Proton pump inhibitors and conventional clinical application of gastric acid suppression drugs H2 receptor antagonists compared with different sites of action and have different characteristics, namely acid-suppressing effect at night is good, rapid onset of acid inhibition strong and long time, easy to take these drugs can quickly and efficiently inhibit gastric acid secretion and clearance of Helicobacter pylori, it is widely used gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer, reflux esophagitis and Zhuo – Ellison syndrome and other diseases treatment. Currently, proton pump inhibitors has been listed on the main omeprazole, lansoprazole, pantoprazole, rabeprazole and esomeprazole.
Physical and

chemical properties ofwhite or white crystalline powder, melting point 174 ~ 175 ℃. Soluble in chloroform, insoluble in alcohol and water.
This product and other proton pump inhibitors as compared to chemically stable. China had 34 omeprazole preparations from Portugal, Brazil, India, China and other 13 countries, the stability of the measurements were made. The results showed that only six products (18%) during the trial showing good physical and chemical stability of. 27 products (79%) less (including Chinese product), the active ingredient a significant chemical decomposition, color and physical properties such as dissolution, are also a corresponding change. The results of a stability test designed to compare the various proton pump inhibitors show investigated eight days at 60 ℃, relative humidity of 75%, after omeprazole decomposition only 3% of the active ingredient, the tenatoprazole 77% of the data, said Alpha pantoprazole stability far superior to omeprazole, is already developed similar products in the most promising products.

Synthesis 

 

Matsuishi, N.; Takeda, H.; Iizumi, K.; Murakami, K.; Hisamitsu, A. US Patent 4,808,596, 1989

Synthesis of Tenatoprazole 1 commences with the coupling of 2-mercapto-5-methoxyimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine 2 with 2-chloromethyl-4-methoxy-3,5-dimethyl pyridine hydrochloride 3 in the presence of potassium hydroxide affords 4 with 73% yield in ethanol and chloroform.  The oxidation of the penultimate sulfide intermediate4 with m-CPBA in chloroform (100 vol) afforded 1

STR1

 

Syn 2

Org. Process Res. Dev., 2009, 13 (4), pp 804–806
DOI: 10.1021/op800173u

synthesis of begins with the solvent-free condensation of 2-mercapto-5-methoxyimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine 2 with 2-chloromethyl-4-methoxy-3,5-dimethyl pyridine hydrochloride 3 to deliver the sulfide intermediate4 with 98% yield.

The final step of the synthesis is the oxidation of the sulfide intermediate with m-CPBA to form tenatoprazole 1. The sulfide intermediate 4 on treatment with 0.9 equiv of m-chloroperbenzoic acid (m-CPBA) at −10 to −15 °C afforded the crude tenatoprazole which was isolated as its sodium salt. The sodium salt of tenatoprazole 5 was purified by recrystallsation using dimethyl formamide and ethyl acetate (2:1 ratio) to yield the pure crystalline tenatoprazole sodium 5. Treatment of tenatoprazole sodium 5 with dil. HCl in the presence of acetone and water afforded the pure tenatoprazole 1

STR1

 

 

PATENT

CN 1861600

CN 1982311

WO 2009116072

CN 101429192

WO 2010043601

IN 2010CH00462

IN 251400

CN 102304127

WO 2012004802

CN 102703922

IN 2009DE01392

WO 2014111957

IN 2013MU00181

IN 2014CH01419

PAPER

Dai, Liyan; Synthetic Communications 2008, V38(4), P576-582

Advanced Materials Research (Durnten-Zurich, Switzerland) (2011), 233-235(Pt. 1, Fundamental of Chemical Engineering), 160-164.

Organic Process Research & Development (2013), 17(10), 1293-1299

Enantiomeric separation of proton pump inhibitors on new generation chiral columns using LC and supercritical fluid chromatography
Journal of Separation Science (2013), 36, (18), 3004-3010………http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jssc.201300419/abstract

PATENT

CN 102304127

https://www.google.com/patents/CN102304127A?cl=en

Tenatoprazole is a new type of gastric H + / K + -ATP enzyme inhibitors (proton pump inhibitor PPI), the chemical name 5-methoxy-2- (4-methoxy-3, 5-dimethyl-2-methylsulfinyl) imidazole and W, 5-b] pyridine, useful in the treatment of gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer, reflux esophagitis and Zhuo – Ai syndrome and gastric acid secretion disorders related diseases. The drug was developed by Japan’s Tokyo Tanabe, Japan’s Mitsubishi Corporation and Japan’s Hokuriku pharmaceutical companies. Compared with other varieties of the same type, which inhibit H + / K + -ATP enzyme activity is stronger, ulcers of various tests are effective, and significantly improve the stability compared with other proton pump inhibitors.

 US patent US4808596 “hidazo [4,5_b] pyridine compounds and pharmaceutical compositions containing same)) synthesis process disclosed Tenatoprazole the below formula:

 

Figure CN102304127AD00031

By  The route of 2-chloro-3,5-dimethyl-4-methoxypyridine hydrochloride with 2-mercapto-5-methoxy-imidazole, 5-b] pyridine under basic conditions condensation of Intermediate 2- [2- (3,5_-dimethyl) -4-methoxy-5-methoxy-pyridylmethyl sulfide] imidazo W, 5-b] pyridine, and then oxidizing the Thai duly omeprazole. This route for the synthesis of pull azole classic line, many pull azoles such as omeprazole can be synthesized by a similar route, this route mild condition, simple operation. But the route condensation, oxidation treatment after use of large amounts of toxic solvent chloroform, is not conducive to industrial scale; lower oxidation yields, the resulting Tenatoprazole containing unreacted starting materials 2- [2_ (3,5 – dimethyl) -4-methoxy-5-methoxy-pyridylmethyl sulfide] imidazo W, 5-b] pyridine, further comprising a sulfone by-product, N- oxide, N- oxide sulfone, These by-products may interfere with purification of tenatoprazole.

Japanese Patent invention Wo 丨 J JP05222038 “5_methoxy-2- [[(4_methoxy-3, 5-dimethyl-2-pyridyl) methyl] thio] imidazo [4,5 ~ b] pyridine and intermediates)) male

Synthesis open Tenatoprazole the below formula:

 

Figure CN102304127AD00041

 4-chloro-2-chloromethyl-3,5-dimethylpyridine -N- oxide 2_ mercapto _5_ methoxy-imidazo – [4, 5-b] pyridine in alkaline under condensation of Intermediate 5-Methoxy-2- (4-chloro-3,5-dimethyl-2-methylthio Bi) imidazo W, 5-b] pyridine-oxide -N- ( yield 82%), then refluxed in a solution of sodium methoxide in methanol to give 5-methoxy-2- (4-oxo-3,5-dimethyl-2-methyl sulfide) imidazo W , 5-b] pyridine -N- oxide (income ¥ 71%), and then at room temperature in methylene chloride, phosphorus trichloride treated with deoxy (yield 95%), and finally oxidation in Tenatoprazole (income Rate not reported). The novel synthetic route, mild reaction conditions, simple operation, the yield of each step is higher, but the route is too long resulting in a total yield is not high, prolonged and rising production costs.

Reaction route is as follows:

 

Figure CN102304127AD00051

Example 1:

] a) 2- [2- (3,5-dimethyl) -4-methoxy-picolyl thioether _5_ methoxy] imidazo [4,5_b] pyridine:

 To a reaction flask was added 2-mercapto-5-methoxy-imidazole, 5-b] pyridine 18. lg, 12g of sodium hydroxide and water 144. 8g, stirred and dissolved at 25 ° C, was added dropwise within Ih 20g of the 2-chloromethyl-dimethyl-4-methoxy _3,5- pyridine hydrochloride and 60g of water were mixed solution dropwise at 25 ° C the reaction 2h, the reaction is completed, filtered, washed with water 144. 8g, 36. 2mL ethanol and washed to obtain a wet powder; wet powder was dried at 50 ° C in vacuo to constant weight to give 2- [2_ (3,5-dimethyl) -4-methoxy-pyridylmethyl sulfide -5 – methoxy] imidazo [4,5-b] pyridine 32. Og;

 2) Preparation of tenatoprazole lithium salt: To a reaction flask was added 2- [2- (3,5_-dimethyl) -4-methoxy-5-methoxy-pyridylmethyl sulfide] imidazo W, 5-b] pyridine 30g, dichloromethane 300g, methanol 15g, and dissolved with stirring; cooled to -10 ° C, was added dropwise the 15g and 485g m-chloroperbenzoic acid in methylene chloride mixed solution, dropwise addition the reaction temperature was controlled at -10 ° C, the dropping time of the pool; the dropwise addition, the temperature control at -10 ° C, the reaction 30min; completion of the reaction, at 10 ° C by the dropwise addition of lithium hydroxide and 135g water 15g mixed solution, drip complete, insulation stirred Ih; filtered cake was washed with acetone 60mL, get wet powder; wet powder was dried at 35 ° C under vacuum to constant weight to give Tenatoprazole lithium salt ^ g;

 3) Preparation Tenatoprazole: To a reaction flask 加入泰 pantoprazole lithium salt 25g, acetone 63mL, water IOOmL, cooling M0 ° C, dropping lmol within lh / L hydrochloric pH7 0, drops. Albert, stirring 30min; the filter cake washed with water 50mL, washed with acetone and 50mL, wet powder was dried at 35 ° C under vacuum to constant weight to give Tenatoprazole 19. Sg.

 Example 2:

 a) 2- [2- (3,5-dimethyl) -4-methoxy-5-methoxy-pyridylmethyl sulfide] imidazo W, 5_b] pyridine (4) Preparation: To the reaction flask was added 2-mercapto-5-methoxy-imidazo 44,5-b] pyridine 18. lg, 11. 2g of potassium hydroxide and water 217mL, stirred and dissolved at! 35 ° C, was added dropwise within 2h by the 33. 3g of 2-chloro-3,5-dimethyl-4-methoxypyridine hydrochloride and 133. 2mL water mixed solution, dropwise at 35 ° C the reaction 4h, the reaction is completed, filtration, water 217mL, 72. 4mL ethanol and washed to obtain a wet powder; wet powder was dried at 60 ° C in vacuo to constant weight to give 2- [2- (3,5-dimethyl) -4-methoxy-pyridylmethyl sulfide -5-methoxy-yl] imidazo W, 5-b] pyridine 33. Ig;

 2) Preparation of tenatoprazole lithium salt: To a reaction flask was added 2- [2- (3,5_-dimethyl) -4-methoxy-5-methoxy-pyridylmethyl sulfide] imidazole and W, 5-b] pyridine 30g, dichloromethane 400mL, methanol 50mL, stirring to dissolve; cooled to _15 ° C, was added drop by the m-chloroperoxybenzoic acid 16g of mixed solution of dichloromethane and 400mL , the process reactor temperature control was added dropwise at -20 ° C, the dropping time 2. 5h; the dropwise addition, the temperature control _15 ° C, the reaction 35min; completion of the reaction, at 15 ° C by the dropwise addition of 20g of hydrogen Lithium oxide and 200mL water mixed solution, drip completed, insulation mixing 1. 5h; filtration, the filter cake washed with acetone 90mL, get wet powder; wet powder was dried at 40 ° C under vacuum to constant weight to give Tenatoprazole lithium salt 28. 6g;

 3) Preparation Tenatoprazole: To a reaction flask 加入泰 pantoprazole lithium salt 25g, ethanol 75mL, water 150mL, cooled to 10 ° C, dropping 6mol / L hydrochloric pH8 0 within 2h,. drops Albert, stirring 40min; the filter cake washed with water 100mL, washed with acetone IOOmL, wet powder was dried at 40 ° C under vacuum to constant weight, yield powder was Tenatoprazole 19. 5g.

Example 3:

 a) 2- [2- (3,5-dimethyl) -4-methoxy-5-methoxy-pyridylmethyl sulfide] imidazo W, 5_b] pyridine (4) Preparation: To the reaction flask was added 2-mercapto-5-methoxy-imidazo 44,5-b] pyridine 18. lg, 8.4g of lithium hydroxide and water 180ml, stirred and dissolved at 30 ° C, was added dropwise within 1. 5h by the Guang .6g 2-chloro-3,5-dimethyl-4-methoxy-pyridine hydrochloride and 90mL water mixed solution, drop end at 30 ° C reaction 3h, the reaction is complete, filtration, water 217mL , washed with 85mL ethanol to obtain a wet powder; wet powder was dried at 55 ° C in vacuo to constant weight to give 2- [2- (3,5-dimethyl) -4-methoxy-5-pyridylmethyl sulfide oxy] imidazo [4,5-b] pyridine 32. 4g;

2) Preparation of tenatoprazole lithium salt: To a reaction flask was added 2- [2- (3,5_-dimethyl) -4-methoxy-5-methoxy-pyridylmethyl sulfide] imidazole and W, 5-b] pyridine 30g, dichloromethane 600mL, methanol 60mL, stirring to dissolve; cooled to -20 ° C, was added drop by the m-chloroperoxybenzoic acid 18g of mixed solution of dichloromethane and 600mL , dropwise addition the reaction temperature is controlled at _20 ° C, the dropping time of the pool; the dropwise addition, the temperature control at _20 ° C, the reaction 40min; completion of the reaction, at 20 ° C by the dropwise addition of lithium hydroxide and 300mL 30g water mixed solution, drip complete insulation mixing tank; filter, the filter cake washed with acetone and 120mL, get wet powder; wet powder was dried at 40 ° C under vacuum to constant weight to give Tenatoprazole lithium salt 28. 7g;

 3) Preparation Tenatoprazole: To a reaction flask 加入泰 pantoprazole lithium salt 25g, methanol 75mL, water 120mL, cooled to 5 ° C, dropping dilute hydrochloric acid within 1 5h tune pH7 5,.. drops Albert, stirring 35min; the filter cake washed with water 75mL, 75mL acetone washed, wet powder was dried at 40 ° C under vacuum to constant weight, yield powder was Tenatoprazole 19. 6g.

Example 4:

 a) 2- [2- (3,5-dimethyl) -4-methoxy-picolyl thioether _5_ methoxy] imidazo [4,5_b] pyridine ⑷ Preparation of: To a solution The reaction flask was added 2-mercapto-5-methoxy imidazole -½, 5-b] pyridine 18. lg, IOg sodium hydroxide and water 150ml, stirred and dissolved at 30 ° C, the 1. 5h dropwise added from 21 . 5g of 2-chloro-3,5-dimethyl-4-methoxypyridine hydrochloride and 90mL water mixed solution, dropwise at 30 ° C the reaction 3h, completion of the reaction, was filtered, washed with water 217mL, The wet powder was washed with ethanol to give 85mL; wet powder was dried at 55 ° C in vacuo to constant weight to give 2- [2- (3,5_-dimethyl) -4-methoxy-5-methoxy-pyridylmethyl sulfide ] imidazo [4,5-b] pyridine 32. 3g;

 2) Preparation of tenatoprazole lithium salt: To a reaction flask was added 2- [2- (3,5_-dimethyl) -4-methoxy-5-methoxy-pyridylmethyl sulfide] imidazole and W, 5-b] pyridine 30g, dichloromethane 500mL, methanol 60mL, stirring to dissolve; cooled to -20 ° C, was added drop by the m-chloroperoxybenzoic acid 18g of mixed solution of dichloromethane and 500mL , the process reactor temperature control was added dropwise at -20 ° C, the dropping time pool; the dropwise addition, the temperature control in -20 ° C, the reaction 40min; completion of the reaction, at 20 ° C by the dropwise addition of lithium hydroxide 30g and 300mL water mixed solution, drip complete insulation mixing tank; filter, the filter cake washed with acetone and 120mL, get wet powder; wet powder was dried at 40 ° C under vacuum to constant weight to give Tenatoprazole lithium salt 28. 6g;

 3) Preparation Tenatoprazole: To a reaction flask 加入泰 pantoprazole lithium salt 25g, isopropanol 75mL, water 120mL, cooled to 5 ° C, dropping 3mol / L hydrochloric within 1 5h. . pH7 5, drops Albert, stirring 35min; the filter cake washed with water 75mL, 75mL acetone washed, wet powder was dried at 40 ° C under vacuum to constant weight, yield powder was Tenatoprazole 19. 7g.

PAPER

An Improved Synthesis of Antiulcerative Drug: Tenatoprazole

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/full/10.1021/op800173u

Department of Research and Development, Srini Pharmaceuticals Ltd., Plot No. 10, Type-C, Road No. 8, Film Nagar, Jubilee Hills, Hyderabad-500033, Andhra Pradesh, India, Department of Chemistry, Osmania University, Tarnaka, Hyderabad-500007, Andhra Pradesh, India and Research and Development, Integrated Product Development Organization, Innovation Plaza, Dr. Reddy’s Laboratories Ltd., Bachupally, Qutubullapur, R. R. Dist. 500 072, Andhra Pradesh, India
Org. Process Res. Dev., 2009, 13 (4), pp 804–806
DOI: 10.1021/op800173u
Publication Date (Web): November 12, 2008
Copyright © 2008 American Chemical Society
* To whom correspondence should be addressed. Telephone: +91 9490783736. E-mail: drkvr_ou@yahoo.com;kvgr1951@rediffmail.com., †Srini Pharmaceuticals Ltd.
, ‡Osmania University.
, §Dr. Reddy’s Laboratory Ltd.
Abstract Image

An efficient, cost-effective and multikilogram-scale process for the synthesis of tenatoprazole 1, an antiulcerative drug, is described. The key steps in this synthesis involve the coupling of 2-mercapto-5-methoxyimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine 2 with 2-chloromethyl-4-methoxy-3,5-dimethyl pyridine hydrochloride 3 to yield 4 and its subsequent oxidation with m-CPBA to produce sulfoxide 1. The process has been scaled up for the multikilogram-scale of compound 1 with an overall yield of 72%. The new process requires no purification process and affords the target compound 1 with 99.8% purity by HPLC.

2-[2-(3,5-dimethyl)pyridylmethylsulfinyl]-5-methoxyimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (1, 15.5 kg, 74%). Purity by HPLC 99.8%; 1H NMR (200 MHz, DMSO) δ 2.2 (s, 6H), 3.8 (s, 6H), 4.8 (s, 2H), 6.6 (d, 1H), 7.8 (d, 1H), 8.2 (s, 1H), 13.0 (s, 1H).

PATENT

http://www.google.co.in/patents/US7507746

the (+) enantiomer of tenatoplazole can be obtained by using chloroform, an industrially acceptable solvent, in accordance with the method proposed by Umemura et al. (J. Org. Chem. 1993, 58, 4592) as follows:

Figure US07507746-20090324-C00001

Example 1 (−)-5-methoxy-2-{(4-methoxy-3,5-dimethyl-2-pyridyl)methyl]sulfinyl}-1H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridineThe conditions for preparative chromatography, shown as an example, are as follows:

Column: 265×110 mm ChiralPak®

Chiral Stationary Phase selector of the Amylose tris type [(S)-a methylbenzylcarbamate]

Flow rate: 570 ml/min

Detection: UV 240 nm

Temperature: Ambient temperature

These conditions are implemented on a liquid preparative chromatography apparatus.

Introduce approximately 2 g of the racemic mixture if tenatoprazole exhibiting purity higher than 99.5%. The (−) enantiomer is identified by measuring the angle of optical rotation, which must be laevogyre. This measurement can be performed directly on the column, the product being dissolved in the solvent (acetonitrile).

Example 2 (+)-5-methoxy-2-{(4-methoxy-3, 5-dimethyl-2-pyridyl)methyl]sulfinyl}-1H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine(R)-(+)-binaphthol 85 g (0.311 mol, 0.2 equivalence), ortho titanic acid isopropyl 42 g (0.148 mol, 0.1 equivalence), water 55 g (3.06 mol) and chloroform 7.5 L were stirred for 1 hour at room temperature. To the resultant, 5-methoxy-2-{(4-methoxy-3,5-dimethyl-2-pyridyl)methyl]thio}imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (MPI), 0.5 kg, was added and stirred for 0.5 hours at room temperature. The thus-prepared mixture was cooled to 5° C. and then 70% aqueous solution of tert-butylhydroperoxide, 0.4 L (approx. 3.0 mol, 2.0 equivalence) was added and stirred for 72 hours at the same temperature as above. After the reaction endpoint was confirmed by HPLC, an aqueous solution of sodium hydroxide was added thereto to separate the aqueous layer, thus removing foreign matter. Then, the resultant was concentrated. Ethyl acetate was added to concentrated residues, which were then heated and suspended. The thus-prepared crude crystalline substances were dissolved in water and neutralized to pH 6.8 with a diluted sulfuric acid solution which was chilled with ice. Deposited crystals were filtered, dried and recrystallized by addition of ethanol to obtain (+)-5-methoxy-2-{(4-methoxy-3,5-dimethyl-2-pyridyl)methyl]sulfinyl}-1H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine {(+)-TU-199}

Yield: 77%

Optical purity: 96.6% ee

Chemical purity: 94.5%

Melting point: 135° C.

Optical rotation: +184° (conditions: C=1.0, N,N-dimethylformaldehyde solution)

Ultraviolet absorption spectrum: (10 μg/mL)λmax (nm): 316, 273, 206

When measurements were carried out, for a solubility of (+), (−) forms and a racemic form (±) of tenatoprazole in relation to water, it was found that the (+) form dissolved almost 3 times greater than the racemic body and (−) form dissolved over 2 times greater than the racemic form, exhibiting favorable physical properties in preparing drugs (refer to Table 2 below).

TABLE 2
(+) form (−) form (±)racemic form
Solubility (water) μg/mL 93.0 74.4 34.6

CLIPS

Tenatoprazole is a pyridinylmethylsulfinyl imidazopyridine compound, which is a weak base. This compound has three pKas. One is the pyridine pKa of pyridinylmethyl moiety and the others are the imidazole pKa and the pyridine pKa of the imidazopyridine moiety. The pyridine pKa1 enables tenatoprazole accumulation in the acidic canaliculus of the parietal cell. Protonation of the imidazopyridine ring enhances electron deficiency at the C-2 position, allowing intramolecular rearrangement to the active form. The active form is the sulfenic acid and/or cyclic sulfonamide, and reacts with luminal cysteine thiols of the enzyme to inhibit the enzyme activity

Synthesis route
from 2-mercapto-5-methoxy-imidazo [4,5-b] pyridine (2) and 2-chloro-3,5-dimethyl-4-methoxypyridine hydrochloride ( 3) by nucleophilic substitution synthesis of 2- (4-methoxy-3,5-dimethyl-2-methylthio) -5-methoxy-imidazo [4,5-b] pyridine (4) the oxidation of 4 1. Figure 1 is a synthesis route of tenatoprazole
Scheme of tenatoprazole

References

  1. DataMonitor. March 2003. Gastrointestinal Disease Update: Digestive Disease Week 2003
  2. Economic Times. 3 March, 2011. Investors unwilling to forgive Wockhardt, promoter for failings
  3. Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma State of New Product Development (as of May 8, 2012)
  4. Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma FY2007 Interim Financial Results
  5. Li H et al. H+/K+-ATPase inhibitors: a patent review. Expert Opin Ther Pat. 2013 Jan;23(1):99-111. PMID 23205582
US4808596 * 24 Jul 1987 28 Feb 1989 Tokyo Tanabe Company, Ltd. Imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine compounds and pharmaceutical compositions containing same
US5753265 * 7 Jun 1995 19 May 1998 Astra Aktiebolag Multiple unit pharmaceutical preparation
US5798120 * 6 Oct 1994 25 Aug 1998 Tokyo Tanabe Company Limited Enteric granule-containing tablets
EP0124495A2 28 Feb 1984 7 Nov 1984 Aktiebolaget Hässle Omeprazole salts
EP0254588A1 24 Jul 1987 27 Jan 1988 Tokyo Tanabe Company Limited Imidazo[4,5-b] pyridine compounds, process for preparing same and pharmaceutical compositions containing same
Reference
1 * Andersson et al., Pharmacology & Therapeutics, 2005, vol. 108, pp. 294-307.
2 * Anon et al., Drugs in R&D, 2002, vol. 3, pp. 276-277.
3 Kakinoki et al., Methods and Findings in Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology, 21(3): 179-187 (1999).
4 Komatsu et al., J. Org. Chem., 58(17): 4529-4533 (1993).
5 Uchiyama et al., Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, 51(4): 457-464 (1999).
6 Uchiyama et al., Methods and Findings in Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology, 21(2): 115-122 (1999).
Citing Patent Filing date Publication date Applicant Title
US20120220623 * 30 Aug 2012 Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma Corporation The enantiomer of tenatoprazole and the use thereof in therapy
CN1453278A * May 10, 2002 Nov 5, 2003 中国人民解放军军事医学科学院放射医学研究所 Omprazole compound and its prepn and application
CN1861600A * Jun 14, 2006 Nov 15, 2006 浙江大学 Preparation process of taytrolazole
Reference
1 * 《Organic Process Research & Development》 20081112 Somaiah Sripathi et al. An Improved Synthesis of Antiulcerative Drug:Tenatoprazole 第804-806页 1-6 第13卷,
2 * 《Synthetic Communication》 20080101 Liyan Dai et al. Improved Synthetic Approach to Tenatoprazole 第576-582页 1-6 第38卷,
3 * 《中国药物化学杂志》 20061231 赵冬梅等 抗溃疡药泰妥拉唑的合成 第360-362页 1-6 第16卷, 第6期
Tenatoprazole
Tenatoprazole.svg
Systematic (IUPAC) name
5-methoxy-2-[(4-methoxy-3,5-dimethylpyridin-2-yl)methylsulfinyl]-1H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine
Clinical data
Routes of
administration
Oral
Pharmacokinetic data
Metabolism Hepatic (CYP2C19-mediated)
Biological half-life 4.8 to 7.7 hours
Identifiers
CAS Number 113712-98-4 Yes
ATC code none
PubChem CID 636411
ChemSpider 552196 Yes
UNII RE0689TX2K Yes
Chemical data
Formula C16H18N4O3S
Molar mass 346.405 g/mol
Chirality Racemic mixture

テナトプラゾール
Tenatoprazole

C16H18N4O3S : 346.4
[113712-98-4]

/////////////Tenatoprazole, 113712-98-4, TU-199, proton pump inhibitor,  treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease, Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma,  Negma Laboratories, PHASE 1, テナトプラゾール

CC1=CN=C(C(=C1OC)C)CS(=O)C2=NC3=C(N2)C=CC(=N3)OC

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Recilisib Sodium, EX-RAD

 phase 1, Uncategorized  Comments Off on Recilisib Sodium, EX-RAD
Jun 162016
 

Recilisib Sodium

Phase I

C16H12ClNaO4S
Molecular Weight: 358.771849 g/mol

 

Recilisib sodium.png

A protein kinase inhibitor potentially for the treatment of acute radiation syndrome.

sodium;4-[(E)-2-[(4-chlorophenyl)methylsulfonyl]ethenyl]benzoate

Onc-01210; ON-01210.Na, Ex-RAD; ON 01210.Na; ON-01210; ON-01210-Na; Recilisib

CAS No. 334969-03-8(free)

CAS 922139-31-9(Recilisib sodium)

Benzoic acid, 4-[(1E)-2-[[(4-chlorophenyl)methyl]sulfonyl]ethenyl]-, sodium salt (1:1)

Onconova Therapeutics Inc, Univ Temple INNOVATOR

Stephen C Cosenza, Lawrence Helson,Premkumar E Reddy, Ramana M V Reddy  INVENTORS

Company Onconova Therapeutics Inc.
Description Synthetic, low molecular weight radioprotectant that modulates DNA repair pathways
Molecular Target DNA
Mechanism of Action Radioprotectant
Therapeutic Modality Small molecule
Latest Stage of Development Phase I
Standard Indication Poisoning
Indication Details Prevent radiation poisoning; Provide radation protection; Treat and prevent acute radiation syndrome (ARS)
  • Originator Onconova Therapeutics
  • Class Radioprotectives; Small molecules; Sulfonamides
  • Mechanism of Action Apoptosis inhibitors; Protein kinase inhibitors
  • Orphan Drug Status Yes – Acute radiation syndrome
  • Phase I Acute radiation syndrome

Most Recent Events

  • 22 Apr 2016 Phase I development is ongoing in the US (PO & SC)
  • 20 Mar 2014 Recilisib receives Orphan Drug status for Acute radiation syndrome in USA
  • 03 Oct 2012 Phase-I clinical trials in Acute radiation syndrome in USA (PO)

Ex-Rad (or Ex-RAD), also known by the code name ON 01210.Na, or recilisib sodium (INN, USAN) is a drug developed by Onconova Therapeutics and the U.S. Department of Defense.[1][2] This newly developed compound is said to be a potent radiation protection agent.  Chemically, it is the sodium salt of 4-carboxystyryl-4-chlorobenzylsulfone.[3]

Clinical trials

The results of two Phase I clinical studies in healthy human volunteers indicate that subcutaneously injected Ex-Rad is safe and well tolerated, with “no evidence of systemic side effects”.[4] A study in mice demonstrated the efficacy of Ex-Rad by increasing the survival rate of mice exposed to typically lethal whole-body irradiation. The study tested oral and parenteral administration of Ex-Rad for both pre- and post-exposure radiomitigation.[1]

Research on Ex-Rad has involved collaboration with the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI), the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular & Cellular Biology at Georgetown University, Long Island University‘s Arnold & Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy, and the Department of Oncological Sciences at the Mt. Sinai School of Medicine.[1]

Mechanism of action

Onconova suggests that Ex-Rad protects cells exposed to radiation against DNA damage, and that the drug’s mechanism of action does not involve scavenging free radicals or arresting the cell cycle. Instead, they claim it employs a “novel mechanism” involving “intracellular signaling, damage sensing, and DNA repair pathways”.[4] Ex-RAD is a chlorobenzylsulfone derivative that works after free radicals have damaged DNA. Onconova CEO Ramesh Kumar believes this is a better approach than trying to scavenge free radicals. “Free radicals are very short-lived, and so the window of opportunity to give a drug is very narrow,” he says. In cell and animal models, Ex-RAD protects hematopoieticand gastrointestinal tissues from radiation injury when given either before or after exposure.[5]

While anti-radiation suits or other protective gear may be effective at reducing radiation exposure, such gear is expensive, unwieldy, and generally not available to public. Moreover, radioprotective gear will not protect normal tissue adjacent to a tumor from stray radiation exposure during radiotherapy. Pharmaceutical radioprotectants offer a cost-efficient, effective and easily available alternative to radioprotective gear. However, previous attempts at radioprotection of normal cells with pharmaceutical compositions have not been entirely successful. For example, cytokines directed at mobilizing the peripheral blood progenitor cells confer a myeloprotective effect when given prior to radiation (Neta et al., Semin. Radiat. Oncol. 6:306-320, 1996), but do not confer systemic protection. Other chemical radioprotectors administered alone or in combination with biologic response modifiers have shown minor protective effects in mice, but application of these compounds to large mammals was less successful, and it was questioned whether chemical radioprotection was of any value (Maisin, J. R., Bacq and Alexander Award Lecture. “Chemical radioprotection: past, present, and future prospects”, Int J. Radiat Biol. 73:443-50, 1998). Pharmaceutical radiation sensitizers, which are known to preferentially enhance the effects of radiation in cancerous tissues, are clearly unsuited for the general systemic protection of normal tissues from exposure to ionizing radiation.

The major biological effects of radiation exposure are the destruction of bone marrow cells, gastrointestinal (GI) damage, lung pneumonitis, and central nervous system (CNS) damage. The long-term effects of radiation exposure include an increase in cancer rates. It has been estimated that the exposure of 100 rems (roentgen equivalent man: a measurement used to quantify the amount of radiation that would produce harmful biological effects) would produce ARS symptoms. Exposure levels above 300 rems would result in the death of approximately 50% of the exposed population.

The α,β-unsaturated aryl sulfones, in particular benzyl styryl sulfones, provide significant and selective systemic protection of normal cells from radiation-induced damage in animals. When used in radiotherapy techniques, these compounds also exhibit independent toxicity to cancer cells. These α,β-unsaturated aryl sulfones, in particular benzyl styryl sulfones, are described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,656,973 and 6,667,346, which are particularly incorporated herein by reference in their entirety. Although these compounds are stable in solid state their aqueous formulations for parenteral administration are pH sensitive and pose challenging hurdles to overcome physical stability. The most likely causative factor may be attributed to the reactive styryl sulfone conjugated double bond, which is prone to Michael addition by nucleophiles and eventual fallout of the conjugated addition product.

U.S. Patent No. 6,656,973, describes in vitro pharmacological effects of DMSO solubilization of a benzyl styryl sulfone (e.g. ON 01210.NA) but fails to disclose a composition comprising ON 01210. NA formulation and specifically, a shelf stable formulation which is suitable for administration to humans.

PCT Application WO 2007/016201 describes pharmaceutical solution compositions for parenteral administration for reducing toxic effects of ionizing radiation in a subject, comprising an effective amount of at least one radioprotective α,β-Unsaturated aryl sulfone, and at least one component selected from the group consisting of a) a water soluble polymer in an amount between about 0.5% and about 90% w/v, b) at least one chemically modified cyclodextrin in an amount between about 20% and about 60% w/v, and c) DMA in an amount between 10% and about 50% w/v.

U.S. Patent Application 20090247624, and corresponding PCT Application WO 2008/105808, are directed to aqueous solutions, which comprise between about 20 mg/ml to about 100 mg/ml of at least one α,β-unsaturated aryl sulfone (e.g., the compound ON 01210. Na ((E)-4-Carboxystyryl-4-chlorobenzylsulfone sodium salt, a cosolvent in an amount between about 25% and about 90% w/v (e.g., about 50% PEG 400), wherein the composition is buffered and exists within the range of about pH 7.0 to about pHIO (e.g., 0.2M Tris-EDTA, pH about 8.5). The aforementioned solution formulations have exhibited a sub-optimal shelf life and lack a preferred degree of solubility and/or stability. These formulations evolved progressively as a result of addressing the most challenging aspects in the formulation and drug development field, namely, solubility and stability parameters that defined the long term viability of these formulations. There seems to be a delicate balance between pH, solubility and stability of the active moiety in aqueous milieu, wherein achieving such balance and development of a shelf stable aqueous formulation has presented a formidable challenge. Therefore, a shelf stable effective solution formulation that prevents the breakdown of the therapeutically active entity and keeps the drug in the solution at the desired pH was most desired and significant effort was directed towards this goal.

What is needed therefore, is a shelf stable effective solution formulation of radioprotective α,β-unsaturated aryl sulfones that prevents the breakdown of the therapeutically active entity and keeps the drug in the solution at the desired pH. This invention solves these and other long felt needs by providing improved solution formulation of radioprotective α,β- unsaturated aryl sulfones having improved physical and chemical stability and enhanced shelf life.

 

SYNTHESIS BY WORLDDRUGTRACKER

 

STR1

 

PATENT

WO 2011119863

An exemplary species of a radioprotective α,β-unsaturated aryl sulfone is ON 01210.Na. ON 01210.Na is a derivative of chlorobenzylsulfone. This compound is described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,656,973 and 6,667,346 as exhibiting valuable prophylactic properties which mitigate the effects of accidental and intentional exposure to life-threatening levels of irradiation. Hence, a systematic development of this compound is described with the objective of developing a shelf stable formulation.

Table 1 describes the general physical properties of ON. 1210. Na. The exemplary compound is a sodium salt of (E)-4-Carboxystyryl-4-chlorobenzylsulfone.

TABLE 1

Physical Properties of ON.1210.Na

Chemical Structure

Figure imgf000018_0001

Chemical Name (E)-4-Carboxystyryl-4-chlorobenzylsulfone,

Sodium Salt

Empirical Formula C16H12ClNa04S

Molecular Weight 358.79

Physical Nature White crystalline flakes

Melting Point 354-356° C.

Solubility Soluble in water at 8-10 mg/ml

The compound ON 01210. Na appears to form at least one polymorph. X-ray diffraction pattern, for example, of precipitated ON 01210. Na is different from that of the originally synthesized compound. Polymorphs of ON 01210.Na are intended to be within the scope of the claims appended hereto.

EXAMPLE 1

Preparation of ON 01210. Na

4-Chlorobenzyl-4-carboxystyryl sulfone (ON 01210) (49 g; 0.145 mol) was taken in a one-liter conical flask and 500 ml of distilled water was added. Sodium hydroxide solution (16 ml: 10 M stock) (0.150 mol.) was added to the conical flask. The contents of the flask were then boiled with stirring till ON 01210 was completely dissolved. The solution was then cooled to room temperature and shining crystals separated were filtered through a fluted filter paper. The crystalline material was dried under vacuum to yield (48 g) (92% yield) of pure ON 1210. Na.

EXAMPLE II

Preparation of ON 01210. Na Formulation A (Without Vitamin E TPGS)

TRIS (968.0 mg), EDTA (233.8 mg), and deionized (DI) water (24 ml) were combined in a beaker equipped with a Teflon coated stirring bar. The mixture was stirred until complete dissolution occurred, and the resulting solution was covered with aluminum foil and allowed to stir gently overnight at room temperature. The following morning, PEG 400 NF (40.0 ml) was added to the TRIS/EDTA aqueous solution with continued stirring. The vessel containing PEG 400 NF was rinsed with DI water (2 x 3.2 ml), and the rinsate added to the formulation mixture. After stirring the mixture to homogeneity (approx. 10 minutes), the pH was measured to be 9.46 using a calibrated electronic pH meter. The pH was adjusted to 8.37 (target pH = 8.40) by the careful addition of 98 pipet drops of 1.0 M HCl (aq) with stirring and allowed to fully equilibrate over a 10-15 minute period. Once the pH steadied at 8.37, ON 01210. Na (4.0 g) was added to the stirring formulation mixture. Complete dissolution required vigorous stirring and brief periodic sonication to break up ON 01210.Na clumps over a two hour period. After complete dissolution of ON 01210. Na, DI water (approx. 5 ml) was added to bring the final volume to approximately 80 milliliters. The pH of the resulting solution was determined to be 8.31, and thus 20 pipet drops of 1.0N NaOH(aq) were added to adjust the final formulation batch (defined as ON 01210.Na Formulation A) pH to 8.41-8.42. Formulation A was 0.22 micron filtered using a 100 ml Gastight Syringe equipped with a Millex®GP filter unit (Millipore Express® PES Membrane; Lot No R8KN13888).

 

PATENT

WO 2008105808

 

PATENT

WO 2007016201 

PATENT

WO 2002069892

The α,β unsaturated aryl sulfones are characterized by cis-trans isomerism resulting from the presence of one or more double bonds. The compounds are named according to the Cahn-Ingold-Prelog system, the IUPAC 1974 Recommendations, Section E: Stereochemistry, in Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, NY, 4th ed., 1992, p.

127-138. Stearic relations around a double bond are designated as “Z” or “E”.

(E)-α,β unsaturated aryl sulfones may be prepared by Knoevenagel condensation of aromatic aldehydes with benzylsulfonyl acetic acids or arylsulfonyl acetic acids. The procedure is described by Reddy et al, Ada. Chim. Hung. 115:269-71 (1984); Reddy et al, Sulfur Letters 13:83-90 (1991); Reddy et al, Synthesis No. 4, 322-23 (1984); and Reddy et al, Sulfur Letters 7:43-48 (1987), the entire disclosures of which are incorporated herein by reference.
According to the Scheme 1 below, Ra and Rb each represent from zero to five substituents on the depicted aromatic nucleus. For purposes of illustration, and not limitation, the aryl groups are represented as phenyl groups, that is, the synthesis is exemplified by the preparation of styryl benzylsulfones. Accordingly, the benzyl thioacetic acid B is formed by the reaction of sodium thioglycollate and a benzyl chloride A. The benzyl thioacetic acid B is then oxidized with 30% hydrogen peroxide to give a corresponding benzylsulfonyl acetic acid C. Condensation of the benzylsulfonyl acetic acid C with an aromatic aldehyde D via a Knoevenagel reaction in the presence of benzylamine and glacial acetic acid yields the desired (E)-styryl benzylsulfone E.

Scheme 1

The following is a more detailed two-part synthesis procedure for preparing (E)-styryl benzylsulfones according to the above scheme.

General Procedure 1: Synthesis (E)-Styryl Benzylsulfones
Part A. To a solution of (8g, 0.2 mol) sodium hydroxide in methanol (200 ml), thioglycollic acid (0.1 mol) is added slowly and the precipitate formed is dissolved by stirring the contents of the flask. Then an appropriately substituted benzyl chloride (0.1 mol) is added stepwise and the reaction mixture is refluxed for 2-3 hours. The cooled contents are poured onto crushed ice and neutralized with dilute hydrochloric acid (200 ml). The resulting corresponding benzylthioacetic acid (0.1 mol) is subjected to oxidation with 30% hydrogen peroxide (0.12 mol) in glacial acetic acid (125 ml) by refluxing for 1 hour. The contents are cooled and poured onto crushed ice. The separated solid is recrystalized from hot water to give the corresponding pure benzylsulfonylacetic acid.
Part B. A mixture of the benzylsulfonyl acetic acid (10 mmol), an appropriately substituted aromatic aldehyde (10 mmol), and benzylamine (0.2 ml) in glacial acetic acid (12 ml) is refluxed for 2-3 hours. The contents are cooled and treated with cold ether (50 ml). Any product precipitated out is separated by filtration. The filtrate is diluted with more ether and washed successively with a saturated solution of sodium bicarbonate (20 ml), sodium bisulfite (20 ml), dilute hydrochloric acid (20 ml) and finally with water (35 ml). Evaporation of the dried ethereal layer yields styryl benzylsulfones as a solid material.

 

According to an alternative to Part A, the appropriate benzylsulfonylacetic acids may be generated by substituting a thioglycollate

HSCH2COOR for thioglycollic acid, where R is an alkyl group, typically C1-C6 alkyl. This leads to the formation of the alkylbenzylthioacetate intermediate (F),

which is then converted to the corresponding benzyl thioacetic acid B by alkaline or acid hydrolysis.

(E)-styryl phenyl sulfones (formula I: n=zero; Qls Q2 = substituted or unsubstituted phenyl) are prepared according to the method of General Procedure 1, replacing the benzylsulfonyl acetic acid in Part B with the appropriate substituted or unsubstituted phenylsulfonyl acetic acid.

(Z)-Styryl benzylsulfones are prepared by the nucleophilic addition of the appropriate thiols to substituted phenylacetylene with subsequent oxidation of the resulting sulfide by hydrogen peroxide to yield the (Z)-styryl benzylsulfone. The procedure is generally described by Reddy et al., Sulfur Letters 13:83-90 (1991), the entire disclosure of which is incorporated herein as a reference.
In the first step of the (Z)-styryl benzylsulfones synthesis, the sodium salt of benzyl mercaptan or the appropriate substituted benzyl mercaptan is allowed to react with phenylacetylene or the appropriate substituted phenylacetylene forming the pure (Z)-isomer of the corresponding styryl benzylsulfide in good yield.
In the second step of the synthesis, the (Z)-styryl benzylsulfide intermediate is oxidized to the corresponding sulfone in the pure (Z)-isomeric form by treatment with hydrogen peroxide.
The following is a more detailed two-part synthesis procedure for preparing (Z)-styryl benzylsulfones:

Procedure 2: Synthesis of (Z)-Styryl Benzylsulfones
Part A. To a refluxing methanolic solution of substituted or unsubstituted sodium benzylthiolate prepared from 460 mg (0.02g atom) of (i) sodium, (ii) substituted or unsubstituted benzyl mercaptan (0.02 mol) and (iii) 80 ml of absolute methanol, is added freshly distilled substituted or unsubstituted phenylacetylene. The mixture is refluxed for 20 hours, cooled and then poured on crushed ice. The crude product is filtered, dried and recrystalized from methanol or aqueous methanol to yield a pure (Z)- styryl benzylsulfide.
Part B. An ice cold solution of the (Z)- styryl benzylsulfide (3.0g) in 30 ml of glacial acetic acid is treated with 7.5 ml of 30% hydrogen peroxide. The reaction mixture is refluxed for 1 hour and then poured on crushed ice. The separated solid is filtered, dried, and recrystalized from 2-propanol to yield the pure (Z)-styryl benzylsulfone. The purity of the compounds is ascertained by thin layer chromatography and geometrical configuration is assigned by analysis of infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectral data.

The bis(styryl) sulfones of formula IN are prepared according to Procedure 3:
Procedure 3
Synthesis of (E)(E)- and (E)(Z)-bis(Styryl) Sulfones
To freshly distilled phenyl acetylene (51.07 g, 0.5 mol) is added sodium thioglycollate prepared from thioglycollic acid (46 g, 0.5 mol) and sodium hydroxide (40 g, 1 mol) in methanol (250 ml). The mixture is refluxed for 24 hours and poured onto crushed ice (500 ml) after cooling. The styrylthioacetic acid, formed after neutralization with dilute hydrochloric acid (250 ml), is filtered and dried; yield 88 g (90%); m.p. 84-86°C.
The styrylthioacetic acid is then oxidized to styrylsulfonylacetic acid as follows. A mixture of styrylthioacetic acid (5 g, 25 mmol) in glacial acetic acid (35 ml) and 30% hydrogen peroxide (15 ml) is heated under reflux for 60 minutes and the mixture is poured onto crushed ice (200 ml) after cooling. The compound separated is filtered and recrystalized from hot water to give white crystalline flakes of (Z)-styrylsulfonylacetic acid; yield 2.4 g (41%); m.p. 150-51°C.
A solution of (Z)-styrylsulfonylacetic acid (2.263 g, 10 m mol) in glacial acetic acid (6 ml) is mixed with an aromatic aldehyde (10 mmol) and benzylamine (0.2 ml) and refluxed for 3 hours. The reaction mixture is cooled, treated with dry ether (50 ml), and any product separated is collected by filtration. The filtrate is diluted with more ether and washed successively with a saturated solution of sodium hydrogen carbonate (15 ml), sodium bisulfite (15 ml), dilute hydrochloric acid (20 ml) and finally with water (30 ml). Evaporation of the dried ethereal layer yields (E)(Z)-bis(styryl)sulfones.
(E),(E)-bis(styryl)sulfones are prepared following the same procedure as described above with exception that sulfonyldiacetic acid is used in place of (Z)-styrylsulfonylacetic acid, and twice the amount of aromatic aldehyde (20 mmol) is used.

The styryl sulfones of formula N, which are systematically identified as 2-(phenylsulfonyl)-l-phenyl-3-phenyl-2-propen-l-ones, may be prepared according to either Method A or Method B of Procedure 4:

Procedure 4
Synthesis of 2-(Phenylsulfonyl)-l-phenyl-3-phenyl-2-propen-l-ones
These compounds are synthesized by two methods which employ different reaction conditions, solvents and catalysts.
Method A: Phenacyl aryl sulfones are made by refluxing α-bromoacetophenones (0.05 mol) and sodium arylsulfinates (0.05 mol) in absolute ethanol (200 ml) for 6-8 hours. The product which separates on cooling is filtered and washed several times with water to remove sodium bromide. The product is then recrystalized from ethanol: phenacyl-phenyl sulfone, m.p. 90-91°C; phenacyl-p-fluorophenyl sulfone, m.p. 148-149°C; phenacyl-p-bromophenyl sulfone, m.p. 121-122°C; phenacyl-p-methoxyphenyl sulfone, m.p. 104-105°C; p-nitrophenacyl-phenyl sulfone, m.p. 136-137°C.
A solution of phenacyl aryl sulfone (0.01 mol) in acetic acid (10 ml) is mixed with an araldehyde (0.01 mol) and benzylamine (0.02 ml) and refluxed for 3 hours. The solution is cooled and dry ether (50 ml) is added. The ethereal solution is washed successively with dilute hydrochloric acid, aqueous 10% NaOH, saturated NaHSO3 solution and water. Evaporation of the dried ethereal layer gives a solid product which is purified by recrystallization.

Method B: Dry tetrahydrofuran (200 ml) is taken in a 500 ml conical flask flushed with nitrogen. To this, a solution of titanium (IN) chloride (11 ml, 0.01 mol) in absolute carbon tetrachloride is added dropwise with continuous stirring. The contents of the flask are maintained at -20°C throughout the course of the addition. A mixture of phenacyl aryl sulfone (0.01 mol) and aromatic aldehyde (0.01 mol) is added to the reaction mixture and pyridine (4 ml, 0.04 mol) in tetrahydrofuran (8 ml) is added slowly over a period of 1 hour. The contents are stirred for 10-12 hours, treated with water (50 ml) and then ether (50 ml) is added. The ethereal layer is separated and washed with 15 ml of saturated solutions of 10% sodium hydroxide, sodium bisulfite and brine. The evaporation of the dried ethereal layer yields 2-(phenylsulfonyl)-l-phenyl-3-phenyl-2 propen-l-ones.

PATENT

https://www.google.com/patents/CN104817488A?cl=en

The structure of this medicine formula (I) shown below,

Figure CN104817488AD00031

Wherein, R1 is absent or is halogen, C1-3 alkyl, alkoxy and -CF3; R2 is absent or is halogen, C1-3 alkyl, alkoxy and -cf3; structural formula (I) The method for the preparation of compounds as follows:

Figure CN104817488AD00041
WO2007016201A2 Jul 28, 2006 Feb 8, 2007 Onconova Therapeutics, Inc. FORMULATION OF RADIOPROTECTIVE α, β UNSATURATED ARYL SULFONES
WO2008105808A2 Jul 27, 2007 Sep 4, 2008 Onconova Therapeutics, Inc. FORMULATIONS OF RADIOPROTECTIVE α, β UNSATURATED ARYL SULFONES
US6656973 Nov 27, 2002 Dec 2, 2003 Temple University – Of The Commonwealth System Of Higher Education (E)-4-carboxystyrl-4-chlorobenzyl sulfone and pharmaceutical compositions thereof
US6667346 Feb 28, 2002 Dec 23, 2003 Temple University – Of The Commonwealth System Of Higher Education Method for protecting cells and tissues from ionizing radiation toxicity with α, β unsaturated aryl sulfones
US6982282 * May 17, 2002 Jan 3, 2006 Sonus Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Emulsion vehicle for poorly soluble drugs
US20090247624 Jul 27, 2007 Oct 1, 2009 Onconova Therapeutics Inc. Formulations of radioprotective alpha beta unsaturated aryl sulfones

References

  1. “Onconova Therapeutics presents new data demonstrating radioprotection by Ex-RAD at RRS annual meeting” (Press release). EurekAlert. 2010-09-27. Archived from the originalon 2011-03-22. Retrieved 2011-03-22.
  2.  Hipp, Van (2011-03-16). “Ex-Rad, the U.S. Military’s Radiation Wonder Drug”. FoxNews.com (FOX News Network). Archived from the original on 2011-03-26. Retrieved 2011-03-26.
  3.  Ghosh, Sanchita P.; Perkins, Michael W.; Hieber, Kevin; Kulkarni, Shilpa; Kao, Tzu-Cheg; Reddy, E. Premkumar; Reddy, M. V Ramana; Maniar, Manoj; Seed, Thomas; Kumar, K. Sree (2009). “Radiation Protection by a New Chemical Entity, Ex-Rad™: Efficacy and Mechanisms”. Radiation Research 171 (2): 173–9. doi:10.1667/RR1367.1. PMID 19267542.
  4.  “Ex-RAD® for Protection from Radiation Injury”. Onconova Therapeutics. 2009. Archived from the original on 2011-03-22. Retrieved 2011-03-22.
  5.  http://cen.acs.org/articles/90/i26/Drugs-Never-Used.html[full citation needed]
  6.  Kouvaris, J. R.; Kouloulias, V. E.; Vlahos, L. J. (2007). “Amifostine: The First Selective-Target and Broad-Spectrum Radioprotector”. The Oncologist 12 (6): 738–47.doi:10.1634/theoncologist.12-6-738. PMID 17602063.
  7.  http://www.news-medical.net/news/20110323/Cellerant-commences-CLT-008-Phase-III-trial-in-patients-with-leukemia.aspx
  8.  Reliene, Ramune; Pollard, Julianne M.; Sobol, Zhanna; Trouiller, Benedicte; Gatti, Richard A.; Schiestl, Robert H. (2009). “N-acetyl cysteine protects against ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage but not against cell killing in yeast and mammals”. Mutation Research/Fundamental and Molecular Mechanisms of Mutagenesis 665: 37. doi:10.1016/j.mrfmmm.2009.02.016.
  9. Mansour, Heba H.; Hafez, Hafez F.; Fahmy, Nadia M.; Hanafi, Nemat (2008). “Protective effect of N-acetylcysteine against radiation induced DNA damage and hepatic toxicity in rats”.Biochemical Pharmacology 75 (3): 773–80. doi:10.1016/j.bcp.2007.09.018. PMID 18028880.
  10.  Demirel, C; Kilçiksiz, S; Ay, OI; Gürgül, S; Ay, ME; Erdal, N (2009). “Effect of N-acetylcysteine on radiation-induced genotoxicity and cytotoxicity in rat bone marrow”. Journal of radiation research 50 (1): 43–50. doi:10.1269/jrr.08066. PMID 19218780.
  11.  Demirel, C; Kilciksiz, S; Evirgen-Ayhan, S; Gurgul, S; Erdal, N (2010). “The preventive effect of N-acetylcysteine on radiation-induced dermatitis in a rat model”. Journal of the Balkan Union of Oncology 15 (3): 577–82. PMID 20941831.
  12. Geiger, Hartmut; Pawar, Snehalata A; Kerschen, Edward J; Nattamai, Kalpana J; Hernandez, Irene; Liang, Hai Po H; Fernández, Jose Á; Cancelas, Jose A; Ryan, Marnie A; Kustikova, Olga; Schambach, Axel; Fu, Qiang; Wang, Junru; Fink, Louis M; Petersen, Karl-Uwe; Zhou, Daohong; Griffin, John H; Baum, Christopher; Weiler, Hartmut; Hauer-Jensen, Martin (2012).“Pharmacological targeting of the thrombomodulin–activated protein C pathway mitigates radiation toxicity”. Nature Medicine 18 (7): 1123–9. doi:10.1038/nm.2813. PMC 3491776.PMID 22729286.

External links

 

 

Patent ID Date Patent Title
US2015265549 2015-09-24 STABLE AQUEOUS FORMULATION OF (E)-4-CARBOXYSTYRYL-4-CHLOROBENZYL SULFONE
US2015238448 2015-08-27 FORMULATION OF RADIOPROTECTIVE ALPHA, BETA UNSATURATED ARYL SULFONES
US2013012588 2013-01-10 COMPOSITIONS AND METHODS FOR PREVENTION AND TREATEMENT OF WOUNDS
US2013012589 2013-01-10 STABLE AQUEOUS FORMULATION OF (E)-4-CARBOXYSTYRYL-4-CHLOROBENZYL SULFONE
US2011250184 2011-10-13 METHODS FOR DETERMINING EFFICACY OF A THERAPEUTIC REGIMEN AGAINST DELETERIOUS EFFECTS OF CYTOTOXIC AGENTS IN HUMAN
US2011028504 2011-02-03 Formulation of radioprotective alpha beta unsaturated aryl sulfones
US2009247624 2009-10-01 FORMULATIONS OF RADIOPROTECTIVE ALPHA BETA UNSATURATED ARYL SULFONES
Ex-Rad
Ex-rad.png
Identifiers
922139-31-9 Yes
PubChem 23668369
Properties
C16H12ClNaO4S
Molar mass 358.77 g·mol−1

//////////Onc-01210,  ON-01210.Na, 334969-03-8,  922139-31-9, Recilisib Sodium, Phase I , A protein kinase inhibitor,   treatment of acute radiation syndrome, Orphan Drug Status, Ex-RAD

C1=CC(=CC=C1CS(=O)(=O)C=CC2=CC=C(C=C2)C(=O)[O-])Cl.[Na+]

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GSK-2881078

 phase 1, Uncategorized  Comments Off on GSK-2881078
Jun 142016
 

GSK-2881078

(R)-1-[1-(Methylsulfonyl)propan-2-yl]-4-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-indole-5-carbonitrile

(R)-1 -(1-(methylsulfonyl)propan-2-yl)-4-(trifluoromethyl)indoline-5-carbonitrile

Phase I

A selective androgen receptor modulator potentially for the treatment of cachexia.

Inventors Philip Stewart Turnbull, Rodolfo Cadilla
Applicant Glaxosmithkline Intellectual Property (No.2) Limited
CAS Number 1539314-06-1
Chemical Name GSK-2881078
Synonyms GSK-2881078
Molecular Formula C14H13NF3N2O2S
Formula Weight 330.33
  • Originator GlaxoSmithKline
  • Mechanism of Action Selective androgen receptor modulators
  • Phase I Cachexia

Most Recent Events

  • 03 Sep 2015 GlaxoSmithKline initiates enrolment in a phase I trial for Cachexia (In volunteers) in USA (NCT02567773)
  • 01 Mar 2015 GlaxoSmithKline completes a phase I trial in Cachexia (In volunteers) in USA (NCT02045940)
  • 31 Jan 2014 Phase-I clinical trials in Cachexia (In volunteers) in USA (PO)

GSK2881078 is a selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) that is being evaluated for effects on muscle growth and strength in subjects with muscle wasting to improve their physical function. Part A of this study will evaluate the safety, efficacy and pharmacokinetics of GSK2881078 in healthy, older men and post-menopausal women who will take daily dosing for 28 days and be followed for a total of 70 days. Part B of this study will characterize the effect of Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) inhibition on the GSK2881078 pharmacokinetics. Part B will only be conducted if safe and efficacious dose is identified in Part A. Part A will include healthy older males and post-menopausal females; and randomize approximately 60 subjects (about 15 per cohort [4 cohorts]) to complete approximately 48 (about 12 per cohort). Part B will enroll one cohort of approximately 15 healthy male subjects to complete approximately 12. The study duration will be approximately 115 days for Part A and 122 days for Part B.

Steroidal nuclear receptor (NR) ligands are known to play important roles in the health of both men and women. Testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) are endogenous steroidal ligands for the androgen receptor (AR) that appear to play a role in every tissue type found in the mammalian body. During the development of the fetus, androgens play a role in sexual differentiation and development of male sexual organs. Further sexual development is mediated by androgens during puberty. Androgens play diverse roles in the adult, including stimulation and maintenance of male sexual accessory organs and maintenance of the musculoskeletal system. Cognitive function, sexuality, aggression, and mood are some of the behavioral aspects mediated by androgens. Androgens have a physiologic effect on the skin, bone, and skeletal muscle, as well as blood, lipids, and blood cells (Chang, C. and Whipple, G. Androgens and Androgen Receptors. Kluwer Academic Publishers: Boston, MA, 2002)

Many clinical studies with testosterone have demonstrated significant gains in muscle mass and function along with decreases in visceral fat. See, for example,

Bhasin (2003) S. J. Gerontol. A Biol. Sci. Med. Sci. 58:1002-8, and Ferrando, A. A. et al. (2002) Am. J. Phys. Endo. Met. 282: E601-E607. Androgen replacement therapy (ART) in men improves body composition parameters such as muscle mass, strength, and bone mineral density (see, for example, Asthana, S. et al. (2004) J. Ger, Series A: Biol. Sci. Med. Sci. 59: 461 -465). There is also evidence of improvement in less tangible parameters such as libido and mood. Andrologists and other specialists are increasingly using androgens for the treatment of the symptoms of androgen deficiency. ART, using T and its congeners, is available in transdermal, injectable, and oral dosage forms. All current treatment options have contraindications (e.g., prostate cancer) and side-effects, such as increased hematocrit, liver toxicity, and sleep apnoea. Side-effects from androgen therapy in women include: acne, hirsutism, and lowering of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels, a notable side-effect also seen in men.

Agents that could selectively afford the benefits of androgens and greatly reduce the side-effect profile would be of great therapeutic value. Interestingly, certain NR ligands are known to exert their action in a tissue selective manner (see, for example, Smith et al. (2004) Endoc. Rev. 2545-71 ). This selectivity stems from the particular ability of these ligands to function as agonists in some tissues, while having no effect or even an antagonist effect in other tissues. The term “selective receptor modulator” (SRM) has been given to these molecules. A synthetic compound that binds to an intracellular receptor and mimics the effects of the native hormone is referred to as an agonist. A compound that inhibits the effect of the native hormone is called an antagonist. The term “modulators” refers to compounds that have a spectrum of activities ranging from full agonism to partial agonism to full antagonism.

SARMs (selective androgen receptor modulators) represent an emerging class of small molecule pharmacotherapeutics that have the potential to afford the important benefits of androgen therapy without the undesired side-effects. Many SARMs with demonstrated tissue-selective effects are currently in the early stages of development See, for example, Mohler, M. L. et al. (2009) J. Med. Chem. 52(12): 3597-617. One notable SARM molecule, Ostarine™, has recently completed phase I and II clinical studies. See, for example, Zilbermint, M. F. and Dobs, A. S. (2009) Future Oncology 5(8):121 1-20. Ostarine™ appears to increase total lean body mass and enhance functional performance. Because of their highly-selective anabolic properties and demonstrated androgenic-sparing activities, SARMs should be useful for the prevention and/or treatment of many diseases in both men and women, including, but not limited to sarcopenia, cachexias (including those associated with cancer, heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and end stage renal disease (ESRD), urinary incontinence, osteoporosis, frailty, dry eye and other conditions associated with aging or androgen deficiency. See, for example, Ho et al. (2004) Curr Opin Obstet Gynecol. 16:405-9; Albaaj et al. (2006) Postgrad Med J 82:693-6; Caminti et al. (2009) J Am Coll Cardiol. 54(10):919-27; lellamo et al. (2010) J Am Coll Cardiol. 56(16): 1310-6; Svartberg (2010) Curr Opin Endocrinol Diabetes Obes. 17(3):257-61 , and Mammadov et al. (201 1 ) Int Urol Nephrol 43:1003-8. SARMS also show promise for use in promoting muscle regeneration and repair (see, for example, Serra et al. (Epub 2012 Apr 12)

doi:10.1093/Gerona/gls083),in the areas of hormonal male contraception and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and in wound healing (see, for example, Demling (2009) ePIasty 9:e9).

Preclinical studies and emerging clinical data demonstrate the therapeutic potential of SARMs to address the unmet medical needs of many patients. The demonstrated advantages of this class of compounds in comparison with steroidal androgens (e.g. , tissue-selective activity, oral administration, AR selectivity, and lack of androgenic effect) position SARMs for a bright future of therapeutic applications.

Although amorphous forms of SARMs may be developed for some uses, compounds having high crystallinity are generally preferred for pharmaceutical use due to their improved solubility and stability. Accordingly, there remains a need in the art for crystalline form of SARMs for therapeutic use.

Patent

WO 2015110958

EXAMPLES

Example 1 – Synthesis of (R)-1 -(1 -(methylsulfonyl)propan-2-yl)-4-(trifluoromethyl)- -indole-5-carbonitrile

(R)-1 -(1-(methylsulfonyl)propan-2-yl)^-(trifluoromethyl)-1 H-indole-5-carbonitrile

Method 1 :

A. (R)-1 -(Methylthio)propan-2 -amine

Step 1

To a solution of commercially available (R)-2-aminopropan-1 -ol (5 g, 66.6 mmol) in MeCN (20 mL), in an ice bath, is added very slowly, dropwise, chlorosulfonic acid (4.46 mL, 66.6 mmol) (very exothermic). The reaction mixture is kept in the cold bath for ~10 min, and then at rt for ~ 30 min. After stirring for another ~ 10 minutes, the solids are collected by filtration, washed sequentially with MeCN (40 mL) and hexanes (100 mL), and dried by air suction for ~ 40 min. to produce the intermediate ((R)-2-aminopropyl hydrogen sulfate.

Step 2:

To a solution of sodium thiomethoxide (5.60 g, 80 mmol) in water (20 mL) is added solid NaOH (2.66 g, 66.6 mmol) in portions over ~ 10 min. Then the intermediate from step 1 is added as a solid over ~ 5 min. The mixture is then heated at 90 °C for ~10 h. The reaction mixture is biphasic. Upon cooling, MTBE (20 mL) is added, and the organic phase (brownish color) is separated. The aqueous phase is extracted with MTBE (2 x 20 mL). The original organic phase is washed with 1 N NaOH (15 mL). The basic aqueous phase is re-extracted with MTBE (2 x 20 mL). All the ether phases are combined, dried over Na2S04, filtered, and concentrated (carefully, since the product is volatile) to afford the crude product as a light yellow oil.

Method 2

(R)-1-(methylthio)propan-2 -amine hydrochloride

A. (R)-2-((tert-Butoxycarbonyl)amino)propyl methanesulfonate

Step 1

Commercially available (R)-2-aminopropan-1 -ol (135 g, 1797 mmol) is dissolved in MeOH 1350 mL). The solution is cooled to 5°C with an icebath, then Boc20 (392 g, 1797 mmol) is added as a solution in MeOH (1000 mL). The reaction temperature is kept below 10°C. After the addition, the cooling bath is removed, and the mixture is stirred for 3 h. The MeOH is removed under vacuum (rotavap bath: 50°C). This material is used as is for the next step.

Step 2

The residue is dissolved in CH2CI2 (1200 mL) and NEt3 (378 mL, 2717 mmol) is added, then the mixture is cooled on an ice bath. Next, MsCI (166.5 mL, 2152 mmol) is added over ~2 h, while keeping the reaction temperature below 15°C. The mixture is stirred in an icebath for 1 h then the bath was removed. The mixture is stirred for 3 d, then washed with a 10% NaOH solution (500 mL 3 x), then with water. The organic phase is dried with MgS04, filtered, then stripped off (rota, 50°C waterbath. The impure residue is dissolved in a mix of 500mL EtOAc (500 mL) and MTBE (500 mL) and then extracted with water to remove all water-soluble salts. The organic phase is dried with MgS04, filtered, then stripped off to afford a white solid residue.

B. (R)-tert-Butyl (1 -(methylthio)propan-2-yl)carbamate

NaSMe (30 g, 428 mmol) is stirred with DMF (200 mL) to afford a suspension. Next, (R)-2-((tertbutoxycarbonyl)amino)propyl methanesulfonate (97 g, 383 mmol) is added portionwise while the temperature is kept below 45°C (exothermic). After the addition, the mixture is stirred for 2 h, then toluene (100 mL) is added. The mixture is washed with water (500 mL, 4 x), then dried with MgS04, and filtered. The filtrate is stripped off (rotavap) to a pale yellow oil.

C. (R)-1 -(Methylthio)propan-2 -amine hydrochloride

Acetyl chloride (150 mL,) is added to a stirred solution of MeOH (600 mL) cooled with an icebath. The mixture is stirred for 30 min in an icebath, then added to (R)-tert-butyl (1 -(methylthio)propan-2-yl)carbamate (78 g, 380 mmol). The mixture is stirred at rt for 2 h, (C02, (CH3)2C=CI-l2 evolution) and then stripped off to a white solid.

D. 4-Fluoro-3-iodo-2-(trifluoromethyl)benzonitrile

To a freshly prepared solution of LDA (1 19 mmol) in anhyd THF (250 mL) at -45°C is added a solution of commercially available 4-fluoro-2-(trifluoromethyl)benzonitrile (21 .5 g, 1 14 mmol) in THF (30 mL), dropwise at a rate such that the internal temperature remained < -40°C (became dark brown during addition). The mixture is stirred 30 min at -45°C, cooled to -70°C and iodine (31 .7 g, 125 mmol) is added in one portion (-70°C→ -52°C). The mixture is stirred for 1 h, removed from the cooling bath and quenched by addition of 10% Na2S203 (ca. 250 mL) and 1 N HCI (ca. 125 mL). The mixture is extracted with EtOAc (x3). Combined organics are washed (water, brine), dried over Na2S04 and concentrated in vacuo. The residue is purified by low pressure liquid chromatography (silica gel, EtOAc / hexanes, gradient elution) followed by

recrystallization from heptane (30 mL), twice, affording 4-fluoro-3-iodo-2-(trifluoromethyl)benzonitrile (15.79 g, 50.1 mmol, 44.1 % yield) as a pale yellow solid.

E. 4-Fluoro-2-(trifluoromethyl)-3-((trimethylsilyl)ethynyl)benzonitrile

A 20 mL vial is charged with 4-fluoro-3-iodo-2-(trifluoromethyl)benzonitrile,(0.315 g, 1 .00 mmol), Pd(PPh3)2CI2 (0.014 g, 0.020 mmol) and Cul (0.0076 g, 0.040 mmol), and sealed with a rubber septum. Anhyd PhMe (5 mL) and DIPA (0.210 mL, 1 .500 mmol) are added via syringe and the mixture is degassed 10 min by sparging with N2while immersed in an ultrasonic bath. Ethynyltrimethylsilane (0.155 mL, 1 .100 mmol) is added dropwise via syringe and the septum is replaced by a PTFE-faced crimp top. The mixture is stirred in a heating block at 60°C. Upon cooling the mixture is diluted with EtOAc and filtered through Celite. The filtrate is washed (satd NH4CI, water, brine), dried over Na2S04 and concentrated in vacuo. The residue is purified by low pressure liquid chromatography (silica gel, EtOAc / hexanes, gradient elution) affording 4-fluoro-2-(trifluoromethyl)-3-((trimethylsilyl)ethynyl)benzonitrile .

F. (R)-1 -(1 -(methylthio)propan-2-yl)-4-(trifluoromethyl)-1 H-indole-5-carbonitrile

A mixture of 4-fluoro-2-(trifluoromethyl)-3-((trimethylsilyl)ethynyl)benzonitrile (1 .16 g, 4.07 mmol), (R)-1 -(methylthio)propan-2-amine (0.599 g, 5.69 mmol) and DIEA (1 .42 mL, 8.13 mmol) in DMSO (7 mL) is heated (sealed tube) at 100°C for 50 min. Upon cooling, the reaction mixture is diluted with EtOAc (50 mL) and washed with water (30 mL). The organic phase is washed with water and brine, dried over Na2S04, filtered and concentrated to give the intermediate aniline. This intermediate is dissolved in NMP (7 mL), treated with KOtBu (1 M in THF) (5.69 mL, 5.60 mmol) and heated at 50°C. The reaction is monitored by LCMS, and deemed complete after 40 min. Upon cooling, the reaction mixture is diluted with EtOAc (40 mL) and washed with water (30 mL). The organic phase is washed with more water and brine, dried over Na2S04, filtered and concentrated. The residue is chromatographed over silica gel using a 5-40% EtOAc-hexane gradient to give the thioether intermediate:

G. (R)-1 -(1-(methylsulfonyl)propan-2-yl)-4-(trifluoromethyl)-1 H-indole-5-carbonitrile

To an ice-cold solution of (R)-1 -(1 -(methylthio)propan-2-yl)-4-(trifluoromethyl)-1 H-indole-5-carbonitrile (0.560 g, 1.88 mmol) in MeOH (10 mL) is added a solution of Oxone (4.04 g, 6.57 mmol) in water (10 mL). After 50 min, the reaction mixture is diluted with water (30 mL) and extracted with EtOAc (50 mL). The organic phase is washed with brine, dried over Na2S04, filtered and concentrated. The residue is chromatographed over silica gel using 100% CH2CI2 to give (R)-1-(1 -(methylsulfonyl)propan-2-yl)-4-(trifluoromethyl)-l H-indole-5-carbonitrile as a white foam that is crystallized from

CH2CI2/hexanes to afford a white solid.

Example 2- Preparation of crystalline form 1 of (R)-1 -(1-(methylsulfonyl)propan-2-yl)-4-(trifluoromethyl)indoline-5-carbonitrile

(R)-1 -(1-(methylsulfonyl)propan-2-yl)-4-(trifluoromethyl)indoline-5-carbonitrile (1 .74kg, 1wt) was dissolved in ethyl acetate (12.0 Kg, 6.9 wt) at 20-30°C. The solution was transferred into a clean reaction vessel via an in-line cartridge filter. The solution was concentrated to ~3.0-5.0 volumes under reduced pressure, keeping the temperature below 50°C. The solution was cooled to 20-30°C, and n-heptane (23.0 Kg, 13.2 wt) was added slowly over ~1 hour. The solution was stirred 1 -2 hrs at 20-30°C, heated to 50-55°C for 2-3 hours, cooled back to 20-30°C and stirred for 1 -2 hours. The slurry was sampled and analyzed by XRPD. The solid was collected by filtration, washed with n-heptane (1 .4 Kg, 0.8 wt), and dried in vacuo at 40-50 °C to provide crystalline

(R)-1 -(1-(methylsulfonyl)propan-2-yl)-4-(trifluoromethyl)indoline-5-carbonitrile (1 .54 Kg, Form 1 ; 88.5 % yield, 99.5% purity) as a slightly colored solid.

Example 3- Preparation of crystalline form 2 of (R)-1 -(1-(methylsulfonyl)propan-2-yl)-4-(trifluoromethyl)indoline-5-carbonitrile

Crude (R)-1 -(1 -(methylsulfonyl)propan-2-yl)-4-(trifluoromethyl)indoline-5-carbonitrile (1 .54 g [theoretical], 1 wt) was dissolved in dichloromethane (5mL, 3.25 vol) and loaded onto a 12-g ISCO column (Si02). The column was eluted with DCM (-500 mL, 325 vol) and the product-containing fractions were combined and concentrated in vacuo. The resulting residue was triturated in n-heptane. The solid was collected by filtration, air-dried, and placed under high vacuum for 3 h to provide GSK2881078A (1 .009 g, Form 2; 65.1 % yield, 100% AUC HPLC-UV) as a white solid.

 

PATENT

https://www.google.com/patents/WO2014013309A1?cl=en22

Example 26

1-(1-(Methylsulfonyl)propan-2-yl)-4-(trifiuoromethyl)-1H-indole-5-carbonitrile Synthesized in a manner similar to Example 9 using 1-(1-(methylthio)propan-2-yl)-4-(trifluoromethyl)-1 H-indole-5-carbonitrile (Example 25): MS (ESI): m/z 331 (MH+).

Example 27

(R)-1 -(1 -(Methylsulfonyl)propan-2-yl)-4-(trifluoromethyl)-1 H-indole-5-carbonitrile

A. (R)-1-(Methylthio)propan-2-amine

Step l

To a solution of commercially available (R)-2-aminopropan-1-ol (5 g, 66.6 mmol) in MeCN (20 mL), in an ice bath, was added very slowly, dropwise, chlorosulfonic acid (4.46 mL, 66.6 mmol) (very exothermic). A gummy beige precipitate formed. The reaction mixture was kept in the cold bath for -10 min, and then at rt for ~ 30 min. The reaction mixture was scratched with a spatula to try to solidify the gummy precipitate. After a few minutes, a beige solid formed. After stirring for another ~ 10 minutes, the solids were collected by filtration, washed sequentially with MeCN (40 mL) and hexanes (100 mL), and dried by air suction for ~ 40 min. The intermediate ((R)-2-aminopropyl hydrogen sulfate, weighed 0.46 g (~ 96% yield).

Step 2:

To a solution of sodium thiomethoxide (5.60 g, 80 mmol) in water (20 mL) was added solid NaOH (2.66 g, 66.6 mmol) in portions over – 10 min. Then the intermediate from step 1 was added as a solid over ~ 5 min. The mixture was then heated at 90 °C for -10 h. The reaction mixture was biphasic. Upon cooling, MTBE (20 mL) was added, and the organic phase (brownish color) was separated. The aqueous phase was extracted with MTBE (2 x 20 mL). The original organic phase is washed with 1 NaOH (15 mL) (this removes most of the color). The basic aqueous phase was re-extracted with MTBE (2 x 20 mL). All the ether phases are combined, dried over Na2S04, filtered, and

concentrated (carefully, since the product is volatile) to afford the crude product as a light yellow oil: 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-cf6) δ 2.91-2.87 (m, 1 H), 2.43-2.31 (m, 2 H), 2.04 (s, 3 H), 1.50 (bs, 2 H), 1.01 (d, J = 6.3 Hz, 3 H).

Alternative synthesis of example 27A:

(R)-1 -(Methylthio)propan-2 -amine hydrochloride

A. (R)-2-((tert-Butoxycarbonyl)amino)propyl methanesulfonate

Step 1

Commercially available (R)-2-aminopropan-1-ol (135 g, 1797 mmol) was dissolved in MeOH 1350 mL). The solution was cooled to 5°C with an icebath, then Boc20 (392 g, 1797 mmol) was added as a solution in MeOH (1000 mL). The reaction temperature was kept below 10°C. After the addition, the cooling bath was removed, and the mixture was stirred for 3 h. The MeOH was removed under vacuum (rotavap bath: 50°C). The resulting residue was a colorless oil that solidified overnight to a white solid. This material was used as is for the next step.

Step 2

The residue was dissolved in CH2CI2 (1200 mL) and NEt3 (378 mL, 2717 mmol) was added, then the mixture was cooled on an ice bath. Next, MsCI (166.5 mL, 2152 mmol) was added over ~2 h, while keeping the reaction temperature below 15°C. The mixture was stirred in an icebath for 1 h then the bath was removed. The mixture was stirred for 3 d, then washed with a 10% NaOH solution (500 mL 3 x), then with water. The organic phase was dried with MgS0 , filtered, then stripped off (rota, 50°C waterbath. The impure residue was dissolved in a mix of 500mL EtOAc (500 mL) and MTBE (500 mL) and then, extracted with water to remove all water-soluble salts.The organic phase was dried with MgS04, filtered, then stripped off to afford a white solid residue: 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-ds) δ 6.94-6.92 (m, 1 H), 4.02 (d, J = 5.8 Hz, 2 H), 3.78-3.71 (m, 1 H), 3.16 (s, 3 H), 1.38 (s, 9 H), 1.06 (d, J = 6.8 Hz, 3 H).

B. (R)-tert-Butyl (1-(methylthio)propan-2-yl)carbamate

NaSMe (30 g, 428 mmol) was stirred with DMF (200 mL) to afford a suspension. Next, (R)-2-((tertbutoxycarbonyl)amino)propyl methanesulfonate (97 g, 383 mmol) was added

portionwise while the temperature was kept below 45°C (exothermic).. After the addition, the mixture was stirred for 2 h, then toluene (100 ml_) was added. The mixture was washed with water (500 ml_, 4 x), then dried with MgS04, and filtered. The filtrate was stripped off (rotavap) to a pale yellow oil: 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 6.77-6.75 (m, 1 H), 3.60-3.54 (m, 1 H), 2.54-2.50 (m, 1 H), 2.43-2.38 (m, 1 H), 2.05 (s, 3 H), 1.38 (s, 9 H), 1.08 (d, J = 7.8 Hz, 3 H).

C. (R)-1-(Methylthio)propan-2-amine hydrochloride

Acetyl chloride (150 mL,) was added to a stirred solution of MeOH (600 mL) cooled with an icebath. The mixture was stirred for 30 min in an icebath, then added to (R)-tert-butyl (1-(methylthio)propan-2-yl)carbamate (78 g, 380 mmol). The mixture was stirred at rt for 2 h, (C02, (CH3)2C=CH2 evolution) and then stripped off to a white solid: 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 8.22 (bs, 3 H), 3.36-3.29 (m, 1 H), 2.80-2.75 (m, 1 H), 2.64-2.59 (m, 1 H (d, J = 6.6 Hz, 3 H).

D. (R)-1 -(1 -(Methylthio)propan-2-yl)-4-(trif luoromethy l)-1 H-indole-5-carbonitrile

A mixture of 4-fluoro-2-(trifluoromethyl)-3-((trimethylsilyl)ethynyl)benzonitrile (Example 21 D,1.16 g, 4.07 mmol), (R)-1-(methylthio)propan-2-amine (0.599 g, 5.69 mmol) and DIEA (1.42 mL, 8.13 mmol) in DMSO (7 mL) was heated (sealed tube) at 100°C for 50 min. Upon cooling, the reaction mixture was diluted with EtOAc (50 mL) and washed with water (30 mL). The organic phase was washed with water and brine, dried over Na2S04, filtered and concentrated to give the intermediate aniline. This intermediate was dissolved in NMP (7 mL), treated with KOtBu (1 M in THF) (5.69 mL, 5.60 mmol) and heated at 50°C. The reaction was monitored by LCMS, and deemed complete after 40 min. Upon cooling, the reaction mixture was diluted with EtOAc (40 mL) and washed with water (30 mL). The organic phase was washed with more water and brine, dried over Na2S04, filtered and concentrated. The residue was chromatographed over silica

gel using a 5-40% EtOAc-hexane gradient to give the thioether intermediate: MS (ESI):

E. (R)-1-(1-(Methylsulfonyl)propan-2-yl)-4-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-indole-5-carbonitrile

To an ice-cold solution of (R)-1-(1-(methylthio)propan-2-yl)-4-(trifluoromethyl)-1 H-indole-5-carbonitrile (0.560 g, 1.88 mmol) in MeOH (10 mL) was added a solution of Oxone (4.04 g, 6.57 mmol) in water (10 mL). After 50 min, the reaction mixture was diluted with water (30 mL) and extracted with EtOAc (50 mL). The organic phase was washed with brine, dried over Na2S04, filtered and concentrated. The residue was chromatographed over silica gel using 100% CH2CI2 to give (R)-1-(1-(methylsulfonyl)propan-2-yl)-4-(trifluoromethyl)-l H-indole-5-carbonitrile as a white foam that was crystallized from CH2CI2/hexanes to afford a white solid (0.508 g, 79% yield): 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 8.17 (d, J = 8.6 Hz, 1 H), 8.12 (d, J = 3.5 Hz, 1 H), 7.81 (d, J – 8.5 Hz, 1 H), 6.87-6.84 (m, 1 H), 5.43-5.35 (m, 1 H), 4.01 (dd, J = 14.8, 8.6 Hz, 1 H), 3.83 (dd, J = 14.8, 4.9 Hz, 1 H), 2.77 (s, 3 H), 1.59 (d, J = 6.8 Hz, 3 H); MS (ESI): m/z 331 (M+H).

 

Philip Turnbull

Philip Turnbull

Director of Chemistry

https://www.linkedin.com/in/philip-turnbull-21266a8

Experience

Director of Chemistry

Receptos, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Celgene

– Present (1 year 1 month)Greater San Diego Area

Director

GSK

(5 years 3 months)RTP

Section Head

GSK

(3 years 1 month)RTP

Group Manager

GlaxoSmithKline

(4 years 1 month)RTP

Investigator

GSK

(4 years 11 months)RTP

Research Associate

Biophysica Foundation

(3 years 8 months)La Jolla, Ca

Education

University of California, Irvine

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Organic synthesis

////////GSK-2881078,  1539314-06-1, Phase 1, clinical trials,  Cachexia , GlaxoSmithKline

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TD 1607

 phase 1, Uncategorized  Comments Off on TD 1607
Jun 132016
 

STR1

STR1

TD-1607

Phase I

A glycopeptide-cephalosporin heterodimer potentially for the treatment of gram-positive bacterial infection.

CAS No. 827040-07-3

C95 H109 Cl3 N18 O31 S2, 
Molecular Weight, 2169.47
Vancomycin, 29-​[[[2-​[[6-​[[[1-​[[(6R,​7R)​-​7-​[[(2Z)​-​2-​(2-​amino-​5-​chloro-​4-​thiazolyl)​-​2-​(methoxyimino)​acetyl]​amino]​-​2-​carboxy-​8-​oxo-​5-​thia-​1-​azabicyclo[4.2.0]​oct-​2-​en-​3-​yl]​methyl]​pyridinium-​4-​yl]​methyl]​amino]​-​1,​6-​dioxohexyl]​amino]​ethyl]​amino]​methyl]​-​, inner salt
Vancomycin, 29-[[[2-[[6-[[[1-[[(6R,7R)-7-[[(2Z)-(2-amino-5-chloro-4-thiazolyl)(methoxyimino)acetyl]amino]-2-carboxy-8-oxo-5-thia-1-azabicyclo[4.2.0]oct-2-en-3-yl]methyl]pyridinium-4-yl]methyl]amino]-1,6-dioxohexyl]amino]ethyl]amino]methyl]-, inner salt
  • Originator Theravance
  • Developer Theravance Biopharma
  • Class Antibacterials; Cephalosporins; Glycopeptides
  • Mechanism of Action Cell wall inhibitors
    • Phase I Gram-positive infections

    Most Recent Events

    • 21 Apr 2016 Phase I development is ongoing in USA
    • 01 Jul 2014 Theravance completes a phase I trial in Healthy volunteers in in USA (NCT01949103)
    • 02 Jun 2014 Theravance Biopharma is formed as a spin-off of Theravance
    • Company Theravance Biopharma Inc.
      Description Glycopeptide cephalosporin heterodimer antibiotic
      Molecular Target
      Mechanism of Action
      Therapeutic Modality Small molecule: Combination
      Latest Stage of Development Phase I
      Standard Indication Gram-negative bacterial infection
      Indication Details Treat Gram-positive bacterial infections

PATENT
WO 2005005436

The present invention provides novel cross-linked glycopeptide – cephalosporin compounds that are useful as antibiotics. The compounds of this invention have a unique chemical structure in which a glycopeptide group is covalently linked to a pyridinium moiety of a cephalosporin group. Among other properties, compounds of this invention have been found to possess surprising and unexpected potency against Gram-positive bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococci aureus (MRSA). Accordingly, in one aspect, the invention provides a compound of formula I:

Figure imgf000004_0001
////////Theravance Biopharma, TD 1607, phase 1, glycopeptide-cephalosporin heterodimer ,  gram-positive bacterial infection
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